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London winter weekend
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Things to do in London this weekend

Can’t decide what to do with your two delicious days off? This is how to fill them up

Rosie Hewitson
Alex Sims
Written by
Rosie Hewitson
&
Alex Sims
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Say goodbye to winter, London! March arrives this weekend, which means we’re only a few weeks out from the beginning of spring. That means warmer days, brighter evenings and a city that’s a little less grim are ours for the taking. Get the month off the best start possible by embracing all the new cultural happenings coming to the city. 

Head to the Duke of York’s Theatre to see Matt Smith give a deliciously punchy performance in Thomas Ostermeier’s surreal, provocative and funny Ibsen production ‘An Enemy of the People’ or catch US comedian Ikechukwu Ufomadu’s magnificently befuddling satire on American public speaking fresh from last year’s Edinburgh Fringe. 

There’s also British Franco-Algerian artist Zineb Sedira’s show recreating sets from classic films at the Whitechapel Gallery and the arrival of the much-anticipated ‘Dune: Part Two’ in cinemas, which, according to Time Out’s film critic is the beat blockbuster since Oppenheimer. 

Still got gaps in your diary? Embrace the warmer days with a look at the best places to see spring flowers in London, or have a cosy time in one of London’s best pubs. If you’ve still got some gaps in your week, check out London’s best bars and restaurants, or take in one of these lesser-known London attractions.

RECOMMENDED: listen and, most importantly, subscribe to Time Out’s brand new, weekly podcast ‘Love Thy Neighbourhood’ and hear famous Londoners show our editor Joe Mackertich around their favourite bits of the city.

What’s on this weekend?

  • Things to do
  • Markets and fairs
  • Brick Lane

Your landlord might disagree, but there really is no excuse for boring white walls. Pick up original work from local artists to brighten up your bedroom for as little as £100 at this accessible alternative to (the many) stuffier and more expensive fairs on the London circuit. Presented by Saatchi Art, there’ll also be installations, performances, DJs, a fully stocked bar. Look out for buzzing lates, wine tasting sessions, live tattooing, tarot readings and a residency from East London Strippers Collective. 

 

  • Things to do
  • Film events
  • London

The best of Polish filmmaking will be taking over a host of London’s iconic screens (including the Southbank Centre, Ciné Lumière, the Institute of Contemporary Arts, plus many, many more) for the 22nd edition of Kinoteka Polish Film Festival. See everything from newly released movies to hidden gems and iconic Polish cinema. ‘Green Border’, a moving depiction of debates on migration in Europe, will kick things off at the opening gala at the BFI Southbank. Plus, look out for screenings accompanied by live music, panel talks, discussions and more. Dzięki!

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Drama
  • Shepherd’s Bush
  • Recommended

In ‘Shifters’, Benedicte Lombe’s follow-up to her Susan Blackburn Prize-winning play ‘Lava’, sparks fly and past emotions weave their way into the present. Why is the feeling of falling in love for the first time so profound?, it asks. Will we remember it forever? In this bittersweet, woozy rom-com the imprint of big, wild adolescent infatuation can’t be forgotten. It’s a play with similarities to Nick Payne’s ‘Constellations’, and it has the sprawling scope of a love story that spans a lifetime. This is a romance overflowing with heart.

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Much-loved (and that’s putting it mildly) south London restaurant Silk Road is back in business. Silk Road, which specialises in extremely good value Xinjiang cuisine, has been closed since August 2023, but has just re-opened in new premises at 47 Camberwell Church St, right next to its old location. You may now return to feasting on your required weekly dose of big plate chicken noodles and lamb shish steel skewers.  

 

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  • Comedy
  • Hackney

To mark International Women’s Day right around the corner, a roster of talented and hilarious women, non-binary, queer people and allies from the world of comedy will be performing a short set and strutting their best catwalk down the runway, all to raise cash for Choose Love, a charity helping refugees and displaced people. Jenny Eclair, Bimini and Lachlan Werner are all on the bill, so expect something pretty special. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Film
  • Drama
  • Recommended

With his previous films, most recently Sundown (2021), Mexican writer-director Michel Franco displayed a talent for incisively observed stories about everyday people, mostly functioning dysfunctionals and ‘Memory’ slowly reveals itself to be his best work since 2012’s After Lucia, the first of three of his films to win awards in Cannes. Jessica Chastain is terrific as the stressed and brittle Sylvia, a social worker and recovering alcoholic, who is made to revisit past trauma after meeting a man she is understandably creeped out when a man (Peter Sarsgaard) at a high-school reunion. It’s remarkable that Franco isn’t better known, but those new to his work have two treats in store: this film, and a back catalogue worth digging into.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Musicals
  • Stratford
  • Recommended

In 2004, as his swansong at Stratford East after a 25-year tenure as artistic director, Philip Hedley programmed ‘The Big Life’. It is bittersweet then, that the hit musical returns to the venue to celebrate its 20-year anniversary in the year of his death – Hedley passed away in January. His memory lives on in this belter of a musical revival and time has done little to age its story. Today it is as infectious, heart-rendering and as achingly resonant as ever. 

 

Treat your ma for Mother’s Day
  • Things to do

Mums deserve high praise all year round, but Mothering Sunday is the ultimate excuse to treat your darling ma and any other matriarchs in your life to a lovely time. We’ve put together a guide to help you plan a proper celebration of mumsy this Sunday; whether you want to take her for a cheeky Mumtini, treat her to a relaxing trip to one of London’s exquisite spas, go on a little beauty shopping spree or send her a stunning bunch of flowers

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Musicals
  • Shaftesbury Avenue
  • Recommended

Indie-folk musician Anaïs Mitchell’s musical retelling of the Orpheus story began life in the mid-’00s as a lo-fi song cycle, which she gigged around New England before scraping the money together to record it as a critically acclaimed 2010 concept album that featured the likes of Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon and Ani DiFranco on guest vocals as the various mythological heroes and villains. Now, ‘Hadestown’ is a full-blown musical directed by the visionary Rachel Chavkin, its success as a show vastly outstripping that of the record. It’s a musical of beautiful texture and tone and it doesn’t hurt that Mitchell has penned some flat-out brilliant songs. It’s a gloriously improbable triumph.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Drama
  • Covent Garden
  • Recommended

Would YOU go fascist for Matt Smith? That’s maybe not the exact moral of German director Thomas Ostermeier’s fabled Ibsen production, now receiving its English language premiere. But it’s certainly something we’re made to contemplate during this deliciously spikey production’s showstopping central scene. Ostermeier and Florian Borchmeyer’s modern adaptation of Ibsen’s 1882 classic sticks pretty close to the original in many ways with a lot of stylistic things chucked in for impact. It’s light, mischievous, absurd and sincerely provocative. 

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Film
  • Science fiction
  • Recommended

Beyond its breathtaking battles and galactic machinations, all soundtracked by a Hans Zimmer score in which the German composer seems to have set all the nobs turned to ‘loudest possible’, what’s most impressive about this seriously-impressive blockbuster sequel takes place beneath the surface. And it’s not the colossal sandworms. No, it’s the subtle character shifts that make Dune: Part Two cerebral as well as cacophonous. The plates are always moving in Frank Herbert’s seminal sci-fi novels: today’s heroes are tomorrow’s pile of corpses. Writer-director Denis Villeneuve gets all this. And his screenplay, again co-written with Prometheus’s Jon Spaihts, gives us a hero’s journey with real devil in it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Charing Cross Road
  • Recommended

At some point in the past, ‘The Time Is Always Now’ might have caused uproar. But this isn’t the past, this is 2024, so seeing room after room of paintings of Black figures by Black artists in the National Portrait Gallery isn’t shocking: instead, it’s just totally normal. The artists here depict the Black figure in endless ways and contexts. As straight portraits by Amy Sherald, as forgotten figures from art history by Barbara Walker, as characters of memetic mythology by Michael Armitage. The Black figure, like Blackness itself, isn't one thing, it’s complex, indefinable.

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Never ending baskets of delicious dim sum. Need we say more? That means tucking into as many dumplings, rolls and buns as you can scoff down, all expertly put together by a Chinatown restaurant celebrating more than ten years of business. Taiwanese pork buns? Check. Pork and prawn soup dumplings? You betcha. ‘Supreme’ crab meat xiao long bao? Of course! And just to make sure you’re all set, Leong’s Legend is further furnishing your palate with a chilled glass of prosecco. Lovely bubbly.

Get 51% off bottomless dim sum at Leong's Legend only through Time Out Offers

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Whitechapel
  • Recommended

British Franco-Algerian artist Zineb Sedira has transformed the Whitechapel Gallery (just as she did the French Pavilion at the last Venice Biennale) into a series of sets based on classic films; there’s the dancehall bar from ‘Le Bal’, a home from ‘The Battle of Algiers’, the coffin from ‘The Stranger’. All films made in the wake of Algerian independence in 1962, all made between Algeria and Europe, all passionate documents of liberation, the radical potential of social upheaval and the power of militant cinema. Sedira endlessly blurs lines. Are you, as a viewer of the work, an actor? The director? The audience, sat on rickety cinema seats? Sedira’s love letter to militant cinema is a celebration of the death of colonialism, she’s allowing you to taste a hint of what it might mean to shrug off the shackles of oppression.

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  • Art
  • Art

Someone’s gone and picked the best young art graduates in the country and put their work on display at Camden Art Centre. Which can only mean that New Contemporaries is back to lift some of the winter gloom. New Contemporaries has been putting out open calls for recent graduates and then giving them their first big exhibition since 1949, so they know what they’re up to. This year’s selection is as good as ever. As a glimpse of the state of art in the UK, it’s pretty unbeatable.

 

  • Museums
  • South Kensington

If the Modern House is your fave Instagram account, get a load of this new exhibition from the V&A full of stylish, irresistible photographs of ‘Tropical Modernism’: an architectural style developed in the hot, humid conditions of West Africa in the 1940s. It’s far more than just property porn though. The style truly emerged after independence was granted in India and Ghana, when the nations began distinguishing themselves from colonial culture and the illustrations, photography and films could provide some clue on how to build homes for our warming world. 

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  • Theatre
  • Theatre & Performance

Rejoice, bargain hunters! The West End is having one of its periodic ticket sales as London Theatre Week returns with hearty discounts on shows big and small. While you can quibble about the name (technically, it's a fortnight) there’s no denying it includes some very decent prices, with tickets starting at £15, £25 or £35 for a variety of shows that include some properly big West End names including ‘Wicked’, ‘Les Miserables’, ‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’ and more. 

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  • Things to do
  • Aldwych

Fancy eating your sad office sarnies in a cocoon of bamboo? Somerset House is turning its bombastic neoclassical courtyard into a garden full of the panda food which you can frolic about in for free to enjoy a quick picnic, a moment of calm in your busy work day, or an inevitable photo-op. The immersive installation is a new large-scale commission from Hong-Kong based artist Zheng Bo that ‘invites visitors to temporarily disconnect from their fast-paced, hyper-connected everyday lives by immersing themselves in the biosphere’. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Bankside
  • Recommended

It’s all in your mind, a figment of your imagination, and that’s how Yoko Ono wants it. The pioneering nonagenarian conceptualist – whose life’s work has been unfairly eclipsed by her Beatles-adjacent fame – wants to plant a seed in your brain, and that’s it. That’s the art. At its best, her art is simple, direct, and, when she started doing it in the mid-1950s, absolutely revolutionary. With her marriage to John Lennon, she formed an artistic partnership that fought for change, peace and an end to war. After Lennon’s death, Ono only became more utopian. Some of this will rub a cynical mind the wrong way, but it’s the earnestness that saves it. Because Ono means it, she believes peace is possible, and wants you to believe it too. 

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Drama
  • Leicester Square
  • Recommended

This one-woman stage adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s short horror is a dizzying technical masterpiece, boasting a tour-de-force performance from Sarah ‘Shiv Roy’ Snook in a multitude of roles. It is also incredibly camp – a show that makes ‘Mamma Mia!’ look like a monster truck rally. Snook plays every single character and is lavishly costumed up in parts that range from elderly pink-haired gentlewomen to rough, bearded scoundrels. It’s a cabaret tour de force, that feels like it’s simultaneously beamed in from Wilde’s England and a hundred years into our future.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Chelsea
  • Recommended

The guts of society are hidden away, but Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky has spent his long career eviscerating them and putting them on display. All the things that make modern life tick – the mines for our batteries, the farms for our food, the abattoirs for our meat – are kept secret, out of view because they lay bare the damage we’re doing to the planet. Burtynsky’s vast, mega-scale photographs here at the Saatchi Gallery drag those private shames out into the open. He photographs salt marshes carving up the Spanish coastline, gold mines spilling cyanide into the Johannesburg’s groundwater. It would make for grim viewing if it wasn’t all so beautiful. It’s all as shocking as it is sad, as awful as it is pretty, and as abstract as it is terrifyingly real.  

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Shakespeare
  • Islington
  • Recommended

South African director Yaël Farber is by no means the first to rack up a three-and-a-half-hour ‘Lear’, but her super atmospheric, wilfully poised style is perfectly suited to it. She simply has no fast setting – not even a medium one – and her heightened, nightmare-like aesthetic rises to meet the strangeness in Shakespeare’s tragedy of insanity and old age. Don’t go making plans to do anything afterwards, but this is a gripping piece of entertainment. Farber plays the tragedy’s mix of druidic weirdness, human tragedy and hard-nosed realpolitik perfectly – ‘The West Wing’ by way of a Sunn O))) gig.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Experimental
  • Hackney Wick
  • Recommended

Anyone up for a hilarious comedy about slavery? Rhianna Ilube’s play is as outrageous as it sounds, set in Ghana’s Cape Coast Castle, where enslaved Ghanaians were held before being loaded onto ships and sent across the Atlantic. It’s now a tourist destination, with a gift shop of course, where Samuel hosts hourly tours for diasporic visitors making a pilgrimage to the site for the Year of Return. Ilube takes the premise and turns it into a see-sawing satire about atrocity tourism. It’s a fresh and fascinating play packed with unpredictability and seriousness of purpose but a lightness of touch in achieving it.

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  • Museums
  • South Kensington

Whether you’re addicted to clock repair videos on Youtube, or you’ve never given the tickers a second thought, you’ll still be surprised at the beauty of the 20 ornate timepieces on display in the Science Museum’s latest exhibition ‘Zimingzhong 凝时聚珍: Clockwork Treasures from China’s Forbidden City’. From huge jewel-encrusted elephant-shaped carriage clocks to glistening gold pagoda-shaped styles, the exhibition brings together treasures loved by Chinese emperors from the Forbidden City. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • South Bank
  • Recommended

Can stone flow? Can metal ooze? Can hardness be rendered soft? I mean, generally, no. But artists are alchemists at heart, so they’re not going to let something like solidity stand in their way. This show looks at 60 years of artists hellbent on the impossible: creating sculptures that ooze and bulge and throb and breathe. Artist duo Drift’s silk lampshades pulsate like jellyfish when you walk in. Teresa Solar Abboud’s airbrushed constructions look like the limbs of some impossible being and Holly Hendry’s twisting knots of metal ducting look like freshly plucked guts. There’s no narrative to unpick, it’s just about ooze, about seeping and twisting and morphing. 

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Drama
  • Leicester Square
  • Recommended

Jez Butterworth’s first play in seven years unfurls with the richness and depth of a well-crafted novel. Backed by West End super producer Sonia Friedman and directed by Sam Mendes, initially, it’s pretty much a kitchen sink drama, following a fractious group of sisters in the sweltering summer of ’76 as they reunite at their childhood home in Blackpool. The occasion is the imminent death of their mother Veronica. It’s a drama about the pain and joy and complicatedness of family, and the story flits from one period to another. Tangents are taken. New characters are woven in at daringly late junctures. It’s increasingly dense and charged. Butterworth remains a one-off, a man who can write plays about ordinary people that carry the charge of the great tragedies.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Aldwych
  • Recommended

Heads hang heavy, bodies sink into the shadowy corners of the room. Frank Auerbach’s charcoal portraits are dismal, dour things, heaving with hurt and pain, but they’re also brutally, shockingly beautiful. Auerbach came of age alongside Leon Kossoff, Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon (he’s still at it well into his 90s too), part of a group of Londoners intent on reworking the form of painting itself. Auerbach did that in the post-war period with thick globs of pigment, creating dense, viscous canvases, closer to sculptures than paintings. But this show at the Courtauld is about his charcoal portraits from the 1950s and ’60s. They’re not his most famous works, but they’re incredible.

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  • Things to do
  • Exhibitions
  • Forest Hill

You can rarely go too long at the Horniman without encountering some form of prehistoric life. Now it’s playing host to ‘Dinosaur rEvolution’, based around five showstopping animatronic models – including a seven-metre-long T-Rex – the general idea is that it’s compliant with current scientific thinking on what these creatures looked like: so lots of feathers, basically, alongside quills, spikes and all sorts of vibrant colours. There are also various games and activities, plus a smattering of casts of actual fossils. 

  • Museums
  • Natural history
  • Bloomsbury

It’s been closed for almost a year, but now we can get our fill of pickled animals in jars again. Founded in 1828 for the purposes of teaching comparative anatomy, University College London’s Grant Museum is housed in a former Edwardian library and retains the air of an avid Victorian collector’s house. Its 68,000 specimen collection encompasses many rare and extinct creatures, including skeletons of the dodo and the zebra-like quagga. After a £300,000 refurb, it now features six new showcases exploring humanity’s impact on biodiversity. Don’t miss a peek at the jar of moles. 

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Hyde Park
  • Recommended

Barbara Kruger has a lot to say. The American artist has sloganeered her way to the very top with a combination of sans serif text and sampled imagery that’s as instantly recognisable and influential as it is widely copied. And her show at the Serpentine is a lexical assault, a torrent of word play and semantic shenanigans. Iconic Kruger works – ‘I shop therefore I am’, ‘Your body is a battleground’ – are reconfigured and adapted for LED screens. Once-static works now move, turned into puzzles with their pieces slowly coalescing to a soundtrack of ticking clocks. It’s a heady, immersive celebration of one of the few artists around who you can genuinely call iconic.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Drama
  • Whitehall
  • Recommended

Here are two things that theatre can do really badly: plays about plays, and plays about the importance of plays. Somehow Sam Holcroft has managed to write a play-within-a-play-about-a-play-within-a-play-about-a-play that tackles the importance of theatre while being un-self-important and actually very funny, and also a structural marvel. It starts by telling us we’re at a wedding (spoiler: we’re not) and then tells us we’re in a play (spoiler: we are) and then keeps peeling back layers and pulling rugs until you start questioning who you actually and what your role is in all this. It’s both a comedy and a sharp bit of political writing. 

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Drama
  • South Bank
  • Recommended

‘Till the Stars Come Down’ is a beautifully observed and often bruisingly hilarious play that centres on Hazel, Maggie and Sylvia, a trio of sisters from Mansfield, who have reunited for the wedding of Sinead Matthews’s Sylvia. It’s a funny, heartbreaking piece of writing, wonderfully acted and tenderly directed. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Victoria
  • Recommended

Hans Holbein was special. And he had to be to make it in the Tudor Court. Arriving from Basel with nothing but a letter of recommendation from humanist philosopher Erasmus, Holbein worked his way to the very top of English society, painting aristocrats, lawyers, politicians, soldiers and, eventually, the king himself. This deeply atmospheric show brings together sketches and drawings by Holbein into a single vivid portrait of sixteenth-century life. The real gold is in watching a master figure things out, in finding out how he made images that have survived the centuries, and still somehow look modern today. 

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Bloomsbury
  • Recommended

This is a rollicking-looking new exhibition for the British Museum, which attempts to put you inside the daily life – both domestic and fighting – of the Roman Legions that controlled much of the world for half a century. It’s about how the elite troops fought: but also about how they lived, and the daily lives of the Empire’s many settled garrisons. Across the course of the exhibit, you’ll meet warriors from Egypt, Italy and England, with over 200 supporting objects, many on display in the UK for the first time, including the world’s oldest intact legionary shield and the world’s oldest set of Roman segmental body armour (which was only unearthed in 2018). 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Piccadilly
  • Recommended

Art isn’t always pretty pictures. Sometimes, art is politics; sometimes, art is power. ‘Entangled Pasts’ places work by contemporary British artists of the African, Caribbean and South Asian diasporas alongside paintings and sculptures by Royal Academicians of the past. The aim is to highlight how art has served to perpetuate racism and colonialism, or at the very least profit from it. It opens with depictions of Black figures by Gainsborough and Reynolds, portraits of former slaves, abolitionists, attendants and illegitimate children. And there are contemporary works by the likes of Yinka Shonibare and Sonia Boyce. 

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Kanishka has launched a brand-new brunch menu focussing on PanIndian food, with a menu embracing the flavours of India’s various regions, from Punjab to Kerala, Kolkata to Delhi and everywhere in between. Kanishka’s skilled kitchen team, led by chef Atul Kochhar, have curated a symphony of new dishes, including Khari paneer tikka, Palak paneer and Chicken tikka pie. And the best bit? You’ll be greeted with a seasonal welcome Kanishka punch cocktail and two hours of bottomless wine or beer. 

Get brunch at Atul Kochhar's Kanishka for £35, only through Time Out Offers.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Mayfair
  • Recommended

Douglas Gordon’s not making a whole lot of sense. Things aren’t neatly delineated or comprehensible in the Scottish Turner Prize-winner’s latest show. The walls are covered in text in countless languages, half-remembered aphorisms gouged into the plaster, fractured sentences in neon, semi-palindromic rhymes in vinyl. None of this is pretty, approachable or cohesive. But it’s so emotional that it doesn’t matter. It feels like a man grasping at a past he can’t get a grip on, trying desperately to grab a steady hold as life slips through his fingers.

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Designed by visionary Tom Dixon, Sea Containers Restaurant is an all-day dining experience along the River Thames. With a three-course sharing platter inspired by the golden age of transatlantic travel and the bounty of local fresh produce, this menu celebrates seasonality and ingredient-led cooking, making it suitable for any occasion. After your meal, you are welcome to visit 12th Knot, the rooftop bar on the 12th floor of Sea Containers London hotel featuring stylish seating and breath-taking views across the river Thames and London’s skyline.

Get three course sharing menu and Prosecco for £30 at Sea Containers, only through Time Out offers.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Bloomsbury
  • Recommended

The most surreal thing about Shuvinai Ashoona’s world of half-human hybrid sea creatures, ice and writhing tentacles is how un-surreal it all is. This is normality for the Inuit artist. She comes from a family and community of artists in Kinngait on Canada’s frozen arctic east coast. She works in an aesthetic tradition where men can be depicted as part-walrus, women can morph into dolphins, and lizard creatures can take part in drawing competitions. Ashoona’s pencil and pen drawings show everyday Inuit life, filled with spiritual presences and hints of encroaching modernity. It’ll leave you shivering, snow-blind and totally mesmerised.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Aldwych
  • Recommended

Cuteness is presented as a cultural powerhouse at Somerset House’s new exhibition, an internet language that’s spread its grammar throughout society, a contemporary aesthetic force with almost no equal. Does that hypothesis work? Not necessarily, but it’s fun to watch them argue it. The exhibition is a mind-melting assault on the senses, a barrage of objects, ephemera, history and artworks that shoves cuteness down your eyeballs until you want to burst (into pink love hearts). It’s complex, tiring, clever, and very good.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theatre
  • Musicals
  • Victoria
  • Recommended

This musical version of the now-classic 1999 film is a pure blast of nostalgia. But like the original screenplay, it’s sharper and spikier than your average teen drama because of the ’90s/’00s trope of taking the bare bones of plot from a much earlier work. Here, the eighteenth-century novel ‘Les Liaisons Dangereuses’. Roger Kumble, the film’s writer, along with Lindsey Rosin and Jordan Ross, use the musical as an opportunity to drop in classic ’90s tunes. ‘Genie in a Bottle’, ‘Torn’, ‘Only Happy When It Rains’; they – and more – are all in here, like exploding memories. Fun is the priority. This show knows what it is and winningly relishes that.

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  • Theatre
  • Musicals
  • Victoria

Back in 1999, the film ‘Cruel Intentions’ seemed rather sophisticated (if you were 16 anyway). In retrospect, it was extremely trashy, which is clearly the driving impulse behind this all-singing adaptation, which pretty much sets out its stall with that subtitle ‘The ’90s Musical’. A jukebox’s worth of classics and not-such-classics from the decade are grafted on, with the focus clearly on the chart pop music that came out in the tail-end of the decade (Backstreet Boys, NSYNC, Christina Aguilera), with a few indie bangers tossed into the mix (The Verve, Garbage, Placebo). It’s booked in for a lengthy stint at The Other Palace, with Rhianne-Louise McCaulsky and Daniel Bravo starring as horny, manipulative step-siblings Sebastian Valmont and Kathryn Merteuil. 

If you want to transport yourself to sunny Spain without buying a plane ticket, look no further than BiBo Shoreditch. Located inside the 5-star Mondrian Shoreditch Hotel, this restaurant brings a taste of southwestern Europe to east London. World-famous Chef Dani Garcia brings his unique, vibrant cuisine, offering distinctive and unforgettable flavours. Choose from a selection of tapas for starters, a selection of authentic mains and delicious desserts, all washed down with the fruity taste of sangria. 

£35 for three courses and a glass of sangria at BiBo Shoreditch only through Time Out offers

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Piccadilly
  • Recommended

There’s been a lot of exhibitions on impressionism, the latest from the RA is looking at how that revolutionary group from nineteenth-century France used paper. It’s full of intimate, small-scale beauties. Traditionally, drawing on paper was saved for preparatory sketches or learning and lessons, but the impressionists rejected tradition. They elevated the humble drawing, seeing paper on a par with canvas. The big names of impressionism are well represented (Monet, Renoir, Morisot, Cezanne) but Degas’ works on paper are jaw dropping, perfect things. We really don’t need another impressionism exhibition. But there’s enough stunning art here to let it slide, just one last time. 

Escape reality through maximum immersion and experience 42 masterpieces from 29 of the world’s most iconic artists, each reimagined through cutting-edge technology. Marble Arch’s high-tech Frameless gallery houses four unique exhibition spaces with hypnotic visuals reimaging work from the likes of Bosch, Dalí and more, all with an atmospheric score. Now get 90 minutes of eye-popping gallery time for just £20 through Time Out offers.

£20 tickets to Frameless immersive art experience only through Time Out offers 

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Our Table for Two restaurant box is back, baby. And there really is no better way to go out and explore the city than with 50% off some of its most sought-after destinations. This limited-edition digital box of goodies includes seven, yes seven, vouchers for a handpicked selection of restaurants around the city. Sign up, receive a code and book your spot. 

Get all inclusive passes to Gripped from £25, only through Time Out offers

Want a roast dinner that’s even better than your mum’s? Well, head to a BrewDog Pub for a full spread of delicious beef rump, pork and apple sauce, roast chicken or butternut squash Wellington, with lashings of gravy, freshly-made Yorkshire puds and all sorts of seasonal veggies. The perfect place to unwind after a busy week, or cure a hangover, each BrewDog pub is offering a belly-busting feast, made even better with a pint of Headliner beer. Book your spot now for the very special price of £15 per person.

Enjoy BrewDogs roast dinner and a pint for £15 only through Time Out offers.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art
  • Millbank
  • Recommended

If anger is an energy, there’s enough here to power the Tate for decades. The gallery is buzzing with the violent ire and shrieking fury of second-wave feminism because after all the freedom and liberation promised by the Swinging Sixties, British women in the 1970s had to deal with the reality: that not much had changed. And they were furious. This is an exhibition of 100 feminist artists and collectives kicking violently against the system. This is art made on the margins, in an attempt to kick back at an unjust society. It’s not meant to look good on a millionaire's wall, it’s meant to change the world. And it did. 

Restore, recharge and rejuvenate this year with Yue Float. Take a break from your hectic urban lifestyle, with a unique floating experience, where you’ll be in the quiet sanctuary of the float pod, where nothing can reach you. These stylish pods are filled with water rich in Epsom salts, to replicate the experience of floating in the Dead Sea. With the water maintained at body temperature, you will lose track of the boundary between the water and your body, feeling the liberation of no gravitational pull on your body as you float. 

Just £39 for your first floating experience at Yue Float only through Time Out offers

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