Worldwide icon-chevron-right Asia icon-chevron-right Singapore icon-chevron-right Where to see interesting architecture and landmarks in Singapore

Where to see interesting architecture and landmarks in Singapore

The first thing you'll notice about Singapore? The skyline and its buildings. Here's what you should be taking a closer look at

The Mill
Photo: The Mill
Advertising

Not to humblebrag but Singapore's got it all. Good food that's easy to find, great museums for some quality art fix, getting around the island is easy breezy and to top it off – some pretty amazing architecture that will catch your eye. If there's one thing Singapore is known for, it's the skyline. Marvel at some of the cool buildings you can find in (and out!) of town. Start snappin' them pictures. 

RECOMMENDED: The oldest restaurants in Singapore and the harshest TripAdvisor reviews of Singapore

Property

Jewel Changi Airport

icon-location-pin Changi 

On the outside, it might just look like a futuristic dome but step inside and you'll see that this majestic dome is home to over 280 dining and retail outlets, the tallest indoor waterfall in the world and even a man-made rainforest. Designed by world-renowned architect Moshe Safdie (who also did Marina Bay Sands), Jewel features a distinctive dome-shaped facade made of glass and steel, making it an iconic landmark in the airport’s landscape.

The Mill
Photo: The Mill
Property

The Mill

icon-location-pin Bukit Merah

The former three-storey creative space that was home to artists and creative types may be demolished but in its place is a cooler, more interesting building. In a sea of grey buildings in an industrial area, The Mill stands out with its Art Deco style, complete with a gothic tower. And if the design looks a little familiar, that's because one of the towers of The Mill was designed by the same team who worked on the iconic Parkview Square in Bugis. The other tower – also in gothic style – is designed by an established architecture firm in Singapore who have designed landmarks like St Andrew's Cathedral and Goodwood Park Hotel. On the inside, The Mill remains to be a creative hub, counting a bespoke tailor and a couple of interior design firms as tenants.   

Advertising
Funan
Photo: CapitaLand
Shopping, Shopping centres

Funan

icon-location-pin City Hall

After three years of redevelopment, the mall formerly known as Funan DigitaLife Mall is starting a new chapter. It is now home to a variety of more than 190 brands clustered around the themes of tech, craft, play, fit, chic and taste. Keeping it modern, industrial chic is the aesthetic of the mall with many vibrant corners and spaces within the mall like the Tree of Life, the Kinetic Wall, a seven-storey green wall and even an urban farm operated by Edible Garden City on the rooftop. 

ArtScience Museum
William Cho
Art

ArtScience Museum

icon-location-pin Marina Bay

Shoehorning art and science into the same room and doing justice to both was always going to be a big risk. Right from the get-go, the concept, with its strong ring of focus-grouped marketability, invites cynicism and excitement in almost equal measure. And then it was the shape of the building, is it a baseball glove, are those fingers, is it a flower? Plus, how to the rooms fit in this structure? Enter and you shall see.

Advertising
Shopping, Shopping centres

Golden Mile Complex

icon-location-pin Raffles Place

Housing Thai eateries, karaoke lounges, occult shops, mini grocery stores and also residential apartments, Golden Mile Complex also has quite a history. Designed in the Brutalist style that was popular back then, the 16-storey building was hailed an architectural and cultural marvel once. Over the years, and a lot of paint coats later, its future is still uncertain. Still, take the chance to check out this monolith, and then get a plate of pad thai after. 

Booking.com
Hotels

Parkroyal on Pickering

icon-location-pin Chinatown

Located beside Chinatown MRT Station, PARKROYAL on Pickering stands out in the CBD skyline of concrete and glass with its layers of greenery. Designed to be built like an office and hotel in a garden, look a little closer and you'll see that the interesting facade is made up of skygardens, reflective pools, and plant walls. Pretty impressive for a high-rise. 

Advertising
National Gallery
Photo:Darren Soh and National Gallery Singapore
Art

National Gallery Singapore

icon-location-pin City Hall

The former City Hall and Supreme Court buildings have been refurbished to become the National Gallery. Now in the heart of the civic district, both buildings have been central to several of Singapore's historial milestones. First constructed in the 1920s, it is now the largest visual art gallery in Singapore, and mostly dedicated to local and South-East Asian art from the 19th century to today. Take in the collection of artwork and the historially rich halls and all its grandeur.

Parkview Square
Photo: teddy-rised/Flickr
Property

Parkview Square

icon-location-pin Rochor

Widely and fondly known as 'the Gotham building' by locals, Parkview Square is an Art Deco monolith in a sea of buildings. Designed by Singapore’s DP Architects and James Adams Design of USA, the majestic exterior screams luxury with bronze, granite and glass. Take a walk in the courtyard before entering the building and you'll find yourself acquainted with bronze effigies of Salvador Dalí, Mozart, Isaac Newton, Pablo Picasso, Rembrandt, Shakespeare, Plato, Dante, Winston Churchill and Albert Einstein. The ostentatiousness doesn't end there. Inside, the grandeur of Atlas Bar will be the first thing you notice. The bar is dedicated to gin, and stocks hundreds of rare or limited edition varieties within a three-storey-tall tower that dominates the space.

Advertising
Property

The Hive, NTU

icon-location-pin Jurong West

If you feel hungry staring at this building, we'd totally understand. The Hive at Nanyang Technological University (NTU), also known as the Learning Hub looks strikingly like a dim sum basket. The $45 million eight-storey building was designed by renowned British designer Thomas Heatherwick and a hub for the university's newly adopted "flipped classroom" teaching method - in which students watch lectures online and class time is used to delve deeper into the topic through discussions and debates. Ah, to be a student at NTU. 

Things to do

Chijmes

icon-location-pin City Hall

Once a convent school, CHIJMES has transformed into a hip lifestyle enclave brimming with bars, restaurants and cafés. It’s currently undergoing a revamp – and it’s more than just a cosmetic update. A fleet of new F&B joints are flocking to the old school, including El Mero Mero, Here & There, and Prive.

Advertising
Kids

Central Fire Station

icon-location-pin City Hall

The iconic red and white Central Fire Station, completed in 1908 has a watchtower and living quarters for firemen. Best thing? The building is still in use as a fire station. If you're hoping to tour the place, remember to have a kid along with you. On Saturday mornings kids get to ride on an engine and take pictures with the Red Rhinos (a smaller version of the fire truck) and the firemen. The Civil Defence Heritage Gallery next door (open Tue-Sun, 10am-5pm), is also a mini fire-fighting museum housing old trucks and equipment, plus interactive games and activities on the second level.

The Interlace
Photo: Mike Cartmell/Flickr
Property

The Interlace

icon-location-pin Bukit Merah

Love it or hate it, The Interlace is a mind-boggling, if not fascinating sight in the Alexandra neighbourhood. Resembling Jenga blocks, the condominium features 31 six-storey blocks irregularly stacked on each other. The spaces between each block are then used for the condo amenities like lush roof gardens, swimming pools, tennis courts and courtyards.   

Advertising
Shophouses, singapore
Photo: Annie Spratt/Unsplash

Heritage shophouses

Perhaps the most charming form of iconic architecture on the list are the heritage shophouses in Singapore. Beautifully restored, you'll still find them around the island. From the residential shophouse homes at Katong and Joo Chiat to the ones that line Amoy and Telok Ayer Street, shophouses are a glimpse of how buildings were made in the past. With Peranakan tiles, French windows and Malay timber fretwork, our heritage shophouses are an eclectic mix of Chinese, Malay and European influences.

Gardens by the bay
Photo: Douglas Sanchez
Things to do

Gardens by the Bay

icon-location-pin Marina Bay

From Supertrees to a tropical highland in a glass dome, Gardens by the Bay is an architecture wonder in itself (sans Marina Bay Sands). The park sprawling across 101 hectares of land deserves recognition on its own for how it is meticulously planned, from its man-made lake to the massive Meadows by the Bay where some festivals have been held. There's also the indoor Flower Dome and Cloud Forest  both futuristic and lush greenhouses perfect for a stroll. 

Advertising
Old Hill Street Police Station
Photo: Eugene Lim/Flickr
Art

Old Hill Street Police Station (formerly MICA Building)

Formerly named MICA, as it houses the Ministry of Information, Communications and the Arts, this neo-classical building was renamed as the Old Hill Street Police Station in 2012, after MICA became the Ministry of Communication and Information. It also houses the Ministry of Culture, Community and Youth. Before all this, the building used to be one of the finest police barracks in the world, vacating the premises only in 1980. Now, its main courtyard, previously used as a police parade ground, has been transformed into an air-conditioned atrium for art activities. Called The ARTrium, it usually houses large scale visual art exhibitions and performing arts events and you can't miss the rainbow coloured, double-leafed louvred windows on this building!

Reflections Keppel Bay
Photo: Victor Garcia/Unsplash
Things to do

Reflections @ Keppel Bay

icon-location-pin Habourfront

Designed by Daniel Libeskind who also created the masterplan of the World Trade Center Memorial, Reflections @ Keppel Bay is a futuristic glass masterpiece sitting pretty in by the bay. The luxury waterfront residential complex also has the best panoramic views of Mount Faber and Sentosa. 

 

Advertising
HDB
Photo: Jun Rong (@65sense)

Our HDB flats

While it might not be as swanky as some of the buildings on the list, our own HDB flats are a testament to the ever-changing landscape of Singapore. From the simple pastel-coloured vintage blocks to modern HDB developments like the Pinnacle@Duxton and SkyTerrace@Dawson, our HDB blocks are definitely architectural icons. 

People's Park Complex
Photo: Nicolas Lannuzel/Flickr
Shopping

People's Park Complex

icon-location-pin Chinatown

A trip to Chinatown is not complete without a visit to People's Park Complex. Hailed as a masterpiece of 1970s experimental architecture, the mustard yellow building we know now took cues from the Brutalist architectural style popular at that time – and was actually finished in raw concrete before it went through several colourful rebirths. The bustling building is now a mixed-use building where you can find street snacks, jewellery stores, electronic goods and other knick knacks. The rooftop carpark is also the perfect place for that impromptu photo shoot. 

Advertising
Booking.com
Hotels

The Fullerton Hotel Singapore

icon-location-pin Raffles Place

Besides blowout brunch buffets and being a stately five-star hotel, The Fullerton Hotel Singapore isn't always known as building of luxury. Built as a fort in 1829, the building later also became home to the country’s General Post Office in 1928. While the neo-classical façade remains, the heritage building holds 400 hotel rooms, a spa, infinity pool and 24-hour fitness centre.

Henderson Waves
Photo: Bill Rosgen/Flickr
Sport and fitness, Walking

Henderson Waves

icon-location-pin Bukit Merah

Even on an intense hike, you can also appreciate great architecture. The wave-shaped 36-metre pedestrian bridge connecting Mount Faber Park to Telok Blangah Hill Park is the best place for you to take a breather from the walking and climbing and take in the views from the bridge. 

Advertising
Esplanade Theatres on the Bay
William Cho
Music

Esplanade Theatres on the Bay

icon-location-pin City Hall

Few buildings have created such a stir as this one. Opened in 2002, the eye-catching bayfront complex has been dubbed ‘the durians’ by locals because of its resemblance to the spiky tropical fruit. Built at a cost of $600 million, the Esplanade is Singapore’s premier performing arts centre and often draws comparisons with the Sydney Opera House. Its crown jewels are the 1,600-seat Concert Hall and the 2,000-seat Theatre. There is also a black box Theatre Studio (seating 220) and a Recital Studio (245). 

Things to do

Marina Bay Sands

icon-location-pin Marina Bay

With more than 2,500 rooms and suites, Marina Bay Sands claims to be the biggest hotel in Singapore. We believe them. The rooms offer views of the South China Sea or Marina Bay and the Singapore skyline, but let’s be honest: the Moshe Safdie-designed SkyPark is the real crowd puller. Sitting prettily atop the three hotel towers 200 metres high, hotel guests and outsiders (who part with $20 for the privilege) can enjoy unfettered views from the Observation Deck. The best views are to be had from the infinity pool, the largest of its kind. Swimming is for hotel guests only but outsiders can watch smug guests swim while munching on $6 hot dogs, which is almost as fun. Sort of.

Want to see more of Singapore?

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising