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Sydney Fringe festival

Time Out Sydney's guide to the Sydney Fringe will tell you who's doing what where – and why the heck?

Photograph: Cynthia Sciberras

In 1947, as the inaugural Edinburgh International Festival prepared to launch, eight theatre companies turned up in the city without invitations – and started their own festival on the fringe of the ‘official’ one. Such is the story of the first Fringe, which has become a behemoth of more than 3000 shows at more than 300 venues; a juggernaut of comedy and theatre that draws top comedy and theatre talent from around the world to Edinburgh each August.

In Australia, Fringe festivals popped up in Melbourne and Adelaide and Perth in reaction to their major arts festivals, but Sydney was a little late to the party: while a Sydney Fringe has existed in various forms since 1994, the current iteration, initiated by a network of venue owners called the Newtown Entertainment Precinct Association, launched in 2010. Unlike most other Fringe festivals, Sydney’s is not parallel or in reaction against a mainstream arts festival; but like all Fringe festivals, it’s open access: anyone who applies and pays a fee to the Fringe can put on a show – at their own cost.

“Where we differ from other Fringe festivals is that we curate where everything goes,” says festival director Kerri Glasscock. “At Adelaide or Edinburgh Fringe, artists approach the venue to be in their Fringe program. But because 94% of our venues are full-time existing spaces, it’s important that the right work goes in that space. It’s important for that venue’s established audiences, so that they’re getting the same quality of work as they’d expect year-round. But it’s also important for the artist, so that they’re in a space that is the right cost for them, so that they have a chance of financial success; and so that they get the right audience for their show.”

Assigning projects to venues also allows Glasscock and her team to curate the festival as a whole, with certain venues forming hubs for distinct flavours or genres of work. Below we look at some of the key venues and precincts to visit this year, and what you can expect from each destination.

Key venues and precincts

Sydney Fringe Off Broadway Festival Hub
Photograph: Cynthia Sciberras
1/5

Sydney Fringe Off Broadway Festival Hub

Sydney Fringe is taking over this warehouse space above Wayward Brewing Co for their pop-up Festival Hub, featuring a bar, a theatre space, and an exhibition space.

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Annandale
PACT
Photograph: Zaina Ahmed
2/5

PACT

The Fringe are presenting an ‘emerging artists hub’ at PACT, splitting the venue into two spaces. Head down for three shows per night, and a Festival bar in the courtyard. “It's important for audiences to know that if you come to this venue, you’re seeing a first-time producer," says Fringe director Kerri Glasscock, "and that it could be ‘the next big thing’, or it could be not so great.”

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Erskineville
Erskineville Town Hall
3/5

Erskineville Town Hall

The Fringe are spearheading a campaign to make this a permanent home for performance. But in the meantime, during September the theatre space will be dominated by Montague Basement: an indie collective spearheaded by ex-Sydney University Dramatic Society (SUDS) theatremakers  Imogen Gardam and Saro Lusty-Cavallari.

Montague Basement will present a modern, condensed take on Ovid's epic Metamorphoses, as well as presenting productions of Sarah Kane’s Crave and a new devised work called Tammy and Kite

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Erskineville
The Factory Theatre
4/5

The Factory Theatre

Sydney Comedy Festival run a program of indie shows here under the banner ‘Fringe Comedy’, taking over just about every nook and cranny of the building to present up to 16 shows per night. It’s a good chance to catch names you’ve never heard of as well as regulars trying out new show material – for between $10-$15 in most cases. 

Among the highlights: Local faves Becky Lucas (pictured), Cameron James and Gen Fricker are doing a triple bill of ‘Pure Gold’ new material; and 2015 Best Newcomer award winner Corey White is trialling his new show.

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Marrickville
Seymour Centre
5/5

Seymour Centre

This is where you can find the circus and physical theatre acts – because the Reginald is one of the only venues with the rig height to accommodate them! This year’s program includes the return of the all-ages acrobatic show Elixir; the debut of Aeon, by Sydney-based aerial theatre company, Aerialize; and Catherine ‘Missy’ Wait’s Adelaide Fringe-acclaimed one-woman acrobatic tribute to coffee: Love, Loss and Lattes.

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Darlington