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Free art in London

See great free art in London without splashing the cash on an admission fee

By Time Out London Art |
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Looking at great art needn't cost the same as buying great art. With a shed-load of free art exhibitions in London, wandering through sculptures, being blinded by neon or admiring some of the best photography in London needn't cost a penny. Here's our pick of the best free art exhibitions this week and beyond.

RECOMMENDED: explore our full guide to free London

Free art exhibitions in London

Karen Knorr Olivier Richon, Punks, 1977. © Karen Knorr Olivier Richon. Courtesy of the Artist.
Art

New Order: Art, Product, Image 1976 – 1995

icon-location-pin Sprüth Magers, Mayfair
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The title of this show is a promise, but not one that anyone ever managed to keep. ‘New Order’ refers to the band, obviously, but also to the era. 1976-1995 represented a time of hefty culture-shifting. There was the arrival and subsequent evolution of punk, the death of Thatcherism and the birth of Blairism. Caught across these works is the promise of things changing, of cultural revolution. 

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David Shrigley 'Hello There' (2012) Video still. Image courtesy of Stephen Friedman Gallery © The artist
Art

Dog Show

icon-location-pin Southwark Park Galleries, Bermondsey
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The contemporary art world gives us many things, but laughter is rarely one of them. Opportunities to squeal? Even rarer. Which is what makes this exhibition at Southwark Park Galleries as precious to behold as a chug wearing a very small hat. If I was the Marie Kondo of art critics, I’d tell you to metaphorically throw out all the other exhibitions because only this one will bring you joy.

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Wong Ping, stills from ‘Dear, can I give you a hand?’ (2018) Image courtesy of the artist.
Art

Wong Ping: Heart Digger

icon-location-pin Camden Arts Centre, Finchley Road
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Wong Ping creates brutal, grim, sexually violent modern fairy tales. But there’s no Red Riding Hood or any cute little pigs here. Instead, the Hong Kong artist tears and rips at ideas of societal dynamics through a world of throbbing cocks, aborted foetuses and mistreated OAPs. 

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Image courtesy of Chisenhale Gallery
Art

Ima-Abasi Okon

icon-location-pin Chisenhale Gallery, Bow
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There’s a soft orange glow being cast across the floor of the Chisenhale. Warm shadows ripple out of mini glass chandeliers filled with cognac and palm oil, stuck into a low false ceiling. Opposite, Ima-Abasi Okon has screwed an army of air conditioners into the wall. Their fans spin and stop, juddering along to a syrupy, slow soundtrack emanating from behind. 

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Jeff Wall 'Parent Child' (2018) © Jeff Wall
Art

Jeff Wall

icon-location-pin White Cube Mason's Yard, St James’s
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Fans of the photographic uncanny are in for a great summer: first Cindy Sherman lands at the NPG, and now Canadian weirdo Jeff Wall has arrived at White Cube. Wall by name, wall by nature, he’s known for his epically scaled, carefully orchestrated set-ups, which have all the complexity of a movie, only they don’t – you know – move. 

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copyright the artist, courtesy the artist and massimo de carlo
Art, Contemporary art

Jamian Juliano-Villani

icon-location-pin Massimo De Carlo, Mayfair
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You can’t call the RSPCA for crimes against toys, apparently, but one look at Jamian Juliano-Villani’s art and you’ll desperately want to. I mean, if hammering a dildo into a toy tiger’s mouth over and over again isn’t abuse, then what is? 

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Helen Cammock 'Chorus' (2019) [detail, Federica – Florence] © Helen Cammock. Image courtesy of the artist
Art

Helen Cammock: Che si può fare

icon-location-pin Whitechapel Gallery, Whitechapel
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The voices of forgotten women echo through the Whitechapel Gallery. British artist Helen Cammock’s commission, made in a residency in Italy, is a mournful look at historical female pain. 

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Liz Johnson Artur 'Burgess Park' (2010) Image courtesy of the artist.
Art

Liz Johnson Artur

icon-location-pin South London Gallery, Camberwell
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Astonishingly, this is the first UK solo show for Liz Jonhson Artur, a London-based, Russian-Ghanaian photographer, who has been documenting the African diaspora for three decades. 

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Alejandro Hoppe Chile (b. 1961) 'Funeral de Rodrigo Rojas de Negri, Santiago' (1986) Gelatin silver print Vintage print
Art

Urban Impulses: Latin American Photography From 1959 - 2016

icon-location-pin The Photographers' Gallery Café, Soho
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It’s easy to take photography for granted. In fact, it’s easy to get sick of photography. But as this show of Latin American photography from 1959 to 2016 makes clear, cameras have long served a more important function than capturing the light bouncing off an acai berry bowl. 

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Faith Ringgold, ‘The Flag is Bleeding #2 (American Collection #6)’, 1997 Courtesy Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London © 2018 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Art

Faith Ringgold

icon-location-pin Serpentine Gallery, Hyde Park
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Art is a weapon. I mean, not always. Sometimes it’s just something pretty for rich people’s walls. But in the hands of octogenarian American artist and activist Faith Ringgold, art is a weapon. Art is a way of fighting back. 

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