The best free attractions in New York

Check out Gotham’s best free attractions! NYC is the perfect place to explore great landmarks without spending a dime.
Coney Island Boardwalk
Photograph: Luciana Golcman Coney Island Boardwalk
By Jennifer Picht |
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Visiting New York, but only have so much dough to spend? Go to the best free attractions and NYC landmarks—including some of the best NYC parks and museums in New York—and you’ll still have plenty of money leftover to treat yourself to a wonderful meal at one of the city’s best restaurants. Even the most seasoned Gothamite should revisit these essential New York attractions.

RECOMMENDED: See all free things to do in NYC

Best free attractions in New York

1
74. Commune with nature in Battery Park
Attractions, Parks and gardens

Battery Park

icon-location-pin Financial District

This 25-acre green space is like Manhattan’s delicate fingernail, neatly plotted with monuments, memorials, gardens, sculptures and a farm-to-table café, plus killer waterfront views from the promenade. Though the area was named for the battery cannons it once housed, the fortified walls of Castle Clinton now protect little more than summer music concerts. If you prefer a quieter nook, seek out the stone labyrinth traced in the park’s lawns; it’s not actually a maze meant to confuse, but a prescribed stroll for meditation.

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venue.ar.bronxmuseum.jpg
Museums, Art and design

Bronx Museum of the Arts

icon-location-pin The Bronx

Founded in 1971 and featuring more than 800 works, this multicultural art museum shines a spotlight on 20th- and 21st-century artists who are either Bronx-based or of African, Asian or Latino ancestry. The museum sporadically offers family programming.

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3
twnyBklynParkPiers
Attractions, Parks and gardens

Brooklyn Bridge Park

icon-location-pin Brooklyn Heights

Some city parks—Central and Prospect, most obviously—were built to replicate rustic fields and preserve serene woodland. Brooklyn Bridge Park, however, was not—and that’s precisely why it has become so popular in the almost three years since it debuted. The project has transformed a chunk of the Brooklyn waterfront into a nearly 85-acre expanse; several sections house unique attractions such as Jane’s Carousel, a restored 1920s merry-go-round, and riverside esplanades with gorgeous Manhattan views.

4
Brooklen Heights promenade and views of Manhattan
Attractions, Parks and gardens

Brooklyn Heights and Brooklyn Promenade

icon-location-pin Brooklyn Heights

It’s easy to forget that you’re standing atop the hectic Brooklyn-Queens Expressway while strolling along this esplanade, which opened in 1950. But the thoroughfare is inextricably linked to the Promenade’s existence: Community opposition to the BQE—which was originally intended to cut through Brooklyn Heights—led city planner Robert Moses to reroute the highway along the waterfront. He also proposed building a park atop the road to block noise.

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5
Central Park; trees
Attractions, Parks and gardens

Central Park

icon-location-pin Central Park

For your stroll, head to the 38-acre wilderness area on the west side of the park known as the Ramble. The area has a storied history (as a gay cruising spot dating back to the turn of the last century, among other things), and it was even proposed as a recreational area in the mid-'50s. Thankfully, the winding trails, rocks and streams seemingly remain waiting to be discovered.

6
Chrysler Building
Photograph: Shutterstock
Attractions, Civic buildings

Chrysler Building

icon-location-pin Midtown East

We won’t argue if you want to call this glimmering pinnacle of Art Deco architecture NYC’s most eye-popping skyscraper. Triangle-shaped windows in its crown are lined with lights, creating a beautiful effect come nighttime. Oozing a moneyed sophistication oft identified with old New York, the structure pays homage to its namesake with giant eagles (replicas of ones added to Chrysler automobiles in the 1920s) in lieu of traditional gargoyles and a brickwork relief sculpture of racing cars, complete with chrome hubcaps.

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7
Attractions, Theme parks

Coney Island Boardwalk

icon-location-pin Coney Island

Coney Island has had its ups and downs, but one thing has been constant for years: a series of dance parties on the boardwalk, with local veterans spinning soulful house, disco, reggae, Afrobeat, Latin rhythms and more.

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East River Park
Photograph: Anna Simonak
Attractions, Parks and gardens

East River State Park

icon-location-pin Williamsburg

East River State Park, otherwise known as the Williamsburg waterfront, is not fancy: stage, concrete, water. But the view of Manhattan is breathtaking, and the neighborhood (even engulfed in new condos) is textbook Williamsburg. Families can relax amongst historic rail yard remnants, and in the summer, take in family-friendly music and film series. Be sure to leave Fido and your bicycle at home—neither are allowed in the space.

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9
Flatiron Building
Attractions, Monuments and memorials

Flatiron Building

icon-location-pin Flatiron

This 21-story Beaux Arts edifice once dominated midtown. Although it’s now dwarfed by other structures, when it debuted in 1902, the triangle-shaped monolith represented the threat and the thrill of modernity: Naysayers claimed it would never withstand the high winds plaguing 23rd Street, while revered photographer Alfred Stieglitz—who captured it in an iconic shot in 1903—wrote that it was “a picture of a new America still in the making.”

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Corona Park-Flushing Meadows, Unisphere
Attractions, Parks and gardens

Flushing Meadows–Corona Park

icon-location-pin Queens

Give the city’s second-biggest park a day and it’ll show you the world: Its most enduring icon is the Unisphere, the mammoth steel globe created for the 1964 World’s Fair. But there’s also first-rate culture and sports at the New York Hall of Science, Arthur Ashe Stadium and Citi Field (depending on how the Mets are doing). The rolling green fields also encompass a zoo, a boating lake, a skate park, a barbecue area, playfields, and a $66 million aquatic and hockey center.

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11
New York attractions: Grand Central Terminal
Attractions, Historic buildings and sites

Grand Central Terminal, Main Concourse

icon-location-pin Midtown East

The 1913 Beaux Arts train station is the city’s most spectacular point of arrival. The station played an important role in the nation’s historic preservation movement, after a series of legal battles that culminated in the 1978 Supreme Court decision affirming NYC’s landmark laws. One notable oddity: The constellations on the Main Concourse ceiling are drawn in reverse, as if seen from heaven.

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New York attractions
Photograph: Ilenia Martini
Attractions, Parks and gardens

The High Line

icon-location-pin Chelsea

There’s something uniquely New York about this aerie. Built on an abandoned railway track, the space is ingenious in its use of reclaimed industrial detritus, a necessity in footage-starved Manhattan. But what we like best is how the pathway takes you above the city while keeping you rooted in urban life: Where else can you walk through a field of wildflowers or sprawl on a lush lawn as cabs zoom along the street beneath you?

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13
New York Public Library Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
Photograph: Moira Brazier
Attractions, Libraries, archives and foundations

New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

icon-location-pin Midtown West

The century-old main branch of the NYPL is about as regal a setting for reading—either on your laptop or those old dusty things called books—as you’ll find in the city. Two massive Tennessee-marble lions, dubbed Patience and Fortitude, flank the main portal and have become the institution’s mascots. Once inside, check out the cavernous Rose Main Reading Room, spanning almost 300 feet and outfitted with chandeliers and stunning ceiling murals.

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Prospect Park, Long Meadow, autumn
Attractions, Parks and gardens

Prospect Park

icon-location-pin Prospect Park

Urban visionaries Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, who most famously designed Central Park, also put their stamp on bucolic Prospect Park. Amenities like the Long Meadow and Nethermead offer plenty of space to pull up on a patch of grass and indulge in some people-watching, and the woodland expanse of the Ravine is a towering forest within bustling Brooklyn. But we also have to give props to Robert Moses: The controversial city planner was behind some of the park’s kid-friendly offerings, including the zoo and Wollman Rink.

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15
Queens County Farm Museum
Museums, Special interest

Queens County Farm Museum

icon-location-pin Queens

The oldest continually farmed land in NYC, the now-47-acre stretch offers a petting zoo for the kids and school groups, who do most of the visiting. But a 2008 expansion of the growing fields means everyone can benefit from the vegetables, wine and meat that the farm cultivates, sold on-site and on Fridays at the Union Square Greenmarket. In the fall, pick your own pumpkins here, and test your navigation skills in the corn maze.

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Rockefeller Plaza
Things to do

Rockefeller Center

icon-location-pin Midtown West

You’ll find plenty of iconic New York sites in this multiblock complex: The ground level alone is home to the tourist-packed ice-skating rink, the bronze Atlas statue and the Today show plaza. Higher up, Top of the Rock rivals the Empire State Building in panoramic city views. You may not be able to access the five private rooftop gardens, but you can still peek at the spaces from Saks Fifth Avenue’s eighth-floor shoe department if you’re curious.

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17
Roosevelt Island Tram
Attractions, Public spaces

Roosevelt Island

icon-location-pin Roosevelt Island

Thanks to the boxy red tram that glides above the East River, Roosevelt Island may be one of the only spots in New York City that’s a joy to get to via public transportation. The area's attractions include tennis courts, ball fields and Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, a tribute to our 32nd President, located on the island's southern tip.

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838.ft.tourclassicvenues04.jpg
Attractions, Religious buildings and sites

St. Patrick’s Cathedral

icon-location-pin Midtown East

This legendary house of worship counts Presidents, movie stars, and business moguls among past and present attendees. While its intricate marble towers are a marvel of Gothic Revival architecture, St. Pat’s interior—including the Louis Tiffany–designed altar and spectacular rose window—is tremendous as both a feat of master craftsmanship and a source of spiritual inspiration.

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19
"Socrates Sculpture Park EAF09"
Attractions, Parks and gardens

Socrates Sculpture Park

icon-location-pin Astoria

Taken over by Mark di Suvero in 1986, this is one of the few locations in the city specifically designated for artists to create outdoor works. The splendid Queens space looks out over the Manhattan skyline and is open 365 days a year.

20
South Street Seaport Museum
Things to do

South Street Seaport

icon-location-pin Financial District

This historic harbor is home to the former Fulton Fish Market, the Seaport Museum, the country's largest privately owned fleet of historic ships and a shopping mall with retail stores and restaurants. It hosts outdoor concerts during the summer, as well as a range of lectures and public programs.

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21
New York attractions
Attractions, Sightseeing

Staten Island Ferry

icon-location-pin Financial District

The price of a harbor crossing between Staten Island and lower Manhattan may be the only activity in New York City that’s cheaper today than it was in 1817. Back then, it was 25 cents; today, it’s free. This 24-hour ferry is a lifeline for commuters making their way from NYC’s southernmost borough, but it’s also a boat trip affording some of the finest views in the world. Keep your eyes peeled for Governors Island to the east and Ellis Island and Lady Liberty to the west as the Manhattan skyline recedes in the vessel’s wake.

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New York attractions
Attractions

Times Square

icon-location-pin Midtown West

Manhattan’s heart was once a hub for vice, teeming with sex shops and drug dealers. Over time that notorious reputation has eroded, and now the area can feel like a tourist-clogged shopping mall. Still, changes such as the stairs above the TKTS booth and a pedestrian plaza along Broadway have improved the sightseeing experience…sort of. If the thought of attending the annual glitzy New Year’s Eve celebration gives you hives, you can see the midnight countdown re-created on a smaller scale at the Times Square Visitor Center.

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23
Photograph: Shutterstock
Attractions, Parks and gardens

Union Square

icon-location-pin Union Square

This park is named after neither the Union of the Civil War nor the labor rallies that once took place here, but simply for the union of Broadway and Bowery Lane (now Fourth Avenue). Even so, it does have its radical roots: From the 1920s until the early ’60s, it was a favorite spot for tub-thumping political oratory. Following 9/11, the park became a focal point for the city’s outpouring of grief. These days you'll find the lively Greenmarket in warmer months, holiday shops in the winter and a summer concert series for kids.

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Washington Square Park
Attractions, Historic buildings and sites

Washington Square Park

icon-location-pin Greenwich Village

The hippies who famously turned up and tuned out in Washington Square Park are still there in spirit, and indeed often in person. In warmer months the park—which was once a potter’s field—is one of the best people-watching spots in the city, hummings with musicians and street artists, while skateboarders clatter near the base of the iconic 1895 Washington Arch (a modest replica of Paris’s Arc de Triomphe). Plus, kids can splash in the area's new fountain on sweltering days.

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26
Chelsea Market
Shopping, Shopping centers

Chelsea Market

icon-location-pin Chelsea

Food-lovers and fashion-addicts can spend hours browsing the specialty stores in Chelsea's renovated Nabisco factory. Grab a coffee at Ninth Street Espresso and take your sweet time as you get the effect of market shopping all under one roof. Check out fresh catches at the Lobster Place, browse a good range of vino at Chelsea Wine Vault, and pick up Italian cooking staples at Buon Italia. If the rain lets up, you're in prime position to enjoy the High Line without the crowds.

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27
Brownstoner Brooklyn Flea
Photograph: Michael Kirby
Shopping, Markets and fairs

Brooklyn Flea

icon-location-pin Bedford-Stuyvesant

Arguably the granddaddy of the borough’s slate of bazaars, the Fort Greene Brooklyn Flea is still in full swing. The location is jam-packed with vendors selling retro jewelry, tchotchkes and everything you don’t need (but want anyway).

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Green-Wood Cemetery
Things to do, Walks and tours

Green-Wood Cemetery

icon-location-pin Greenwood

A century ago, this site vied with Niagara Falls as New York State’s greatest tourist attraction. Filled with Victorian mausoleums, cherubs and gargoyles, Green-Wood is the resting place of some half-million New Yorkers, among them Jean-Michel Basquiat, Leonard Bernstein and Boss Tweed. But there’s more to do here than grave-spot: Check out the massive Gothic arch at the main entrance or climb to the top of Battle Hill, one of the highest points in Kings County and a pivotal spot during the Battle of Brooklyn in 1776.

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29
Photograph: Laura Gallant
Attractions, Historic buildings and sites

Woolworth Building

icon-location-pin Financial District

This century-old building is one of New York City’s 20 tallest, and at the time of its completion in 1913, it was the tallest in the world. Its lights were turned on in a fancy opening ceremony by President Woodrow Wilson, who pushed the on switch from Washington, D.C. Since the demise of the Woolworth Company in the ’90s, the building has passed hands to property developers who plan to convert the top 30 floors into luxury condos. You can still tour the lobby, however, with its stunning glass and marble interiors.

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Grand Central Terminal main concourse
Attractions, Historic buildings and sites

Grand Central Terminal, Main Concourse

icon-location-pin Midtown East

There is no place in New York that better welcomes commuters to the Big Apple than this gorgeous Beaux-Arts train station. For the past century, the 44 platforms–the most platforms of any train station in the world–have kept New Yorkers rolling in and out of the city on a constant basis with 750,000 commuters walking through it’s storied halls each day. If you have time before your departure on the MetroNorth, make a day of it with an old fashioned shoe shine from the celebrated cobblers at Leather Spa followed by lunch at Grand Central Oyster Bar and Restaurant.

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31
Photograph: Courtesy Colin Miller
Attractions, Arcades and amusements

The Rink at the Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park

icon-location-pin Midtown West

Bryant Park’s 17,000-square-foot outdoor rink is free and open late. Don’t get too excited—the admission may be gratis, but you’ll have to shell out $19 to rent skates (or BYO). Still, it’s a veritable winter wonderland: After your time on the ice, warm up at spacious rinkside restaurant Celsius. If you want to practice your lutzes and axels with ample spinning room, try visiting during off-peak hours.

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