Marylebone area guide

Where to shop, eat, drink and stay in elegant Marylebone

© James Attree
Marylebone has been a fashionable area in London since at least the seventeenth century – as its catalogue of famous residents (past and present) attests. Today it’s a world-famous shopping destination. Skip Oxford Street and instead amble along the much quieter and elegant Marylebone High Street, home to the famous Daunt Books. The area is also a first-class eating and drinking destination, from the world famous Chiltern Firehouse to newcomers like Bar Termini Centrale – the perfect spot for negroni fans. There are also a handful of attractions in this neck of the woods, including Madame Tussauds, the Sherlock Holmes Museum and the fascinating Wallace Collection. Mostly, though, people come here to wander the gorgeous Georgian streets and soak up the classy vibes. Now, isn’t that just as refined as it gets. 
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Marylebone highlights

Daunt Books
Shopping

Daunt Books

This beautiful Edwardian store will always be seen as a travel specialist thanks to its elegant three-level back room.

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
Chiltern Firehouse
Restaurants

Chiltern Firehouse

André Balazs is one of the world’s most eligible bachelors, with a net worth estimated at $450 million. But rather than follow the example of George Best (who once said ‘I spent 90 percent of my money on women, drink and fast cars; the rest I wasted’), the Hungarian-born US citizen has set about building a hotel and restaurant empire, starting with Chateau Marmont in Hollywood and progressing through The Mercer Hotel in New York City, among many others.Chiltern Firehouse is Balazs’s first hotel outside the US. A lovely 1889 Grade II-listed Victorian-gothic fire brigade building has been rebuilt from the inside out, and now boasts a discreetly gated garden as the entrance. The staff’s aura of professionalism and sincerity hits you immediately: they’re uniformly well drilled and rarely go off-script. Checking in feels a bit like arriving at  a Scientology meeting. The best seats are at the kitchen counter, where you can watch the chefs at work in their lavishly appointed huge open kitchen. Nuno Mendes – formerly of Viajante – is in residence, creating a menu that reflects current trends in top international restaurants. The kitchen can do fiddly and pretty, exemplified by stunning appetisers such as the tiny, slider-like ‘doughnuts’ filled with crab meat. But pretty’s only part of the story here. Good flavour combinations and modern cooking techniques are also to the fore. We watched as our squab starter was expertly carved, the pigeon meat shockingly pink but the skin crisp. A

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Wallace Collection

Wallace Collection

This handsome house, built in 1776, contains an exceptional collection of eighteenth-century French furniture, paintings and objets d'art, as well as an amazing array of medieval armour and weaponry. It all belonged to the Marquesses of Hertford and Sir Richard Wallace and has been open to the public since 1900, with room after grand room containing Louis XIV and XV furnishings and Sèvres porcelain, while the galleries are hung with paintings by Titian, Velázquez, Fragonard, Gainsborough and Reynolds; Franz Hals's Laughing Cavalier (neither laughing, nor a Cavalier) is one of the best know, along with Fragonard's The Swing. The Wallace Collection has a permanent area where children can try on armour and also holds frequent temporary exhibitions. Regular events include the chance for children to explore the Wallace Collection and take part in artist-led workshops.

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
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Wigmore Hall

Wigmore Hall

Venue says: “From Schumann to Vivaldi to jazz, come to Wigmore Hall for opening week of our new season! First concert: Florian Boesch, Sep 8, 7.30pm.”

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
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Restaurants in Marylebone

Twist
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Twist

Venue says: “Visit our new Twist Rustic in Stoke Newington!”

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
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Pachamama
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Pachamama

Fetch me a llama! I need to make a sacrifice. That’s the way to show gratitude to Pachamama. In Peru, Pachamama is the goddess Mother Earth; in London, she is a new Marylebone restaurant. But the name is apt: this is a place to revere. Four pillars underpin the Quechuan cosmos (water, earth, sun and moon), and four pillars support a great restaurant: food, service, decor and ambience. This hotspot has it all – and a price tag that mere mortals can afford. We arrived with no great expectations. There’d been no buzz about the place, and we’d have walked past the door had we not been looking for it. Just another Peruvian bandwagon-jumper, we assumed, trotting down the stairwell into the basement. Oh, how wrong we were. Firstly, it looked gorgeous. There was a thoughtful mix of rough and smooth, like a beautiful old hacienda in the process of being done up: chunks of plaster knocked out of the pillars, pretty vintage lampshades, wooden dressers full of pot plants. Low lighting, laidback Ibiza sounds and a constant influx of impeccably groomed twenty- and thirtysomethings (where do they all come from? Are the cooks cloning them in the kitchen?) made for a vibe that was electric. Not bad for a restaurant that had been open for less than a month, and should by rights have been inhabited only by friends, family, and bloggers with big cameras. On weekends, said our nothing’s-too-much-trouble waiter, the place goes from being ‘civilised party’, to ‘party party’, with a DJ on the deck

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Book online
Dinings
Restaurants

Dinings

Once one of Marylebone’s best-kept secrets, Dinings now has a reputation larger than its compact, converted-townhouse setting. Getting a table in the basement is unlikely without a booking, but if you’re lucky there may be a spare stool at the street-level sushi counter. If you’re not keen on small spaces, then you may just like the ground floor better – it’s brighter with more windows. Whatever your thoughts on the venue itself, the food is indisputably excellent (make sure you’re packing plastic, as costs do mount up). Conceived by Nobu alumni Masaki Sugisaki and Keiji Fuku, it displays plenty of Latin flair along with other innovative flourishes. Nobu-esque curved potato ‘tar-tar’ chips filled with minced fatty tuna, avocado and wasabi/jalapeño sauce offered an inviting taster of the style. The much-celebrated seared wagyu beef nigiri garnished with cubes of ponzu jelly and minced truffle was also a triumph. Presented on a long platter, a lunchtime sushi selection (good value at £23) tasted every bit as good as it looked. Another lunch dish of pork ‘shabu shabu’ saw ready-cooked slices of tender pork balanced atop a heap of sticky rice and dressed with spicy fermented Korean sauce gochujang – despite the pungent mix, it wasn’t overpowering. With polite, efficient chefs and waiters too, Dinings is a top performer.  

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Zoilo
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Zoilo

There were no tables when we called to book. ‘But we’re a very counter-focused restaurant,’ they told us. This sounded like maître d’ spin, but on arrival all became clear, because this place is pretty much all counters: ground floor hugging the bar; downstairs around the kitchen. The few diners sat at actual tables looked a little left out by comparison. Watch us work, look how good we are, it seems to say. Rightly so. This is deconstructed, small-plates Argentinian cooking, and it works – with flavours as good as these, you want as many different mouthfuls as you can get. An empanada’s pastry was expert, as enjoyable as its creamy spinach and raisin filling. Fried chunks of queso de chancho (‘head cheese’) were like a seriously adult version of chicken nuggets. A miniature steak (softened up with the sous vide treatment then blasted on the grill) was flawless, the flavour like undiluted beef cordial. But the full choirs came out for the sous vide-cooked octopus (with ‘tuna mayo’, no less) and again for some sweetbreads, which were so delicate it seemed cruel to bite into them. But we did, and how sweetly they submitted. Desserts run from a traditional, ultra-sweet ‘tres leches’ milk cake to a tart passionfruit sorbet, and most of the all-Argentinian wine list is available by glass or small carafe. Chef Diego Jacquet has also teamed with restaurateur Alberto Abbate to open sister restaurant Casa Malevo.  

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Bars and pubs in Marylebone

Bar Termini Centrale
Bars and pubs

Bar Termini Centrale

Squeezing into the original Bar Termini on Soho’s Old Compton Street is all part of the charm that helped cement its status as one of the finest places to drink in the capital. The tiny bar serving equally tiny coffees and cocktails is literally the toast of the town. So it’s good news that a second, larger bar has arrived. When we visited on a weeknight, rather than struggling to find a seat, we had our pick of the tables. The same elegant Italian look has been carried across to this suitably sophisticated Marylebone location, with muted green leather banquettes and luggage rails up above. A small terrace outside offers an authentic alfresco experience. Staff milled about the chequerboard floor, singing and whistling along to old Italian tunes, or perched at our table to offer advice on the menu – including samples when we were feeling particularly indecisive. Not that you’ll need much help, since the menu is almost a carbon copy of the one in Soho; an inspiringly anti-choice drinks list with just a smattering of negronis and aperitivos on offer. As before, they’re all liquid perfection: the olive bellini is a gorgeously balanced savoury number and the Spritz Termini, made with rhubarb cordial, is awakening as ever. What the extra space has allowed is a fully functioning kitchen for snacking from breakfast right through to the evening. That includes mini paninis for just £1, although they’d sadly ran out when we visited. We made do with an exquisite selection of Italian ch

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
Purl
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Purl

We’ve long been fans of Purl, one of London’s first speakeasy-type bars and begetter of both VOC and the Worship Street Whistling Shop. It’s become extremely popular, which means that booking is advisable – though walk-ins will be seated if there’s space. The layout of the bar, over a number of smallish spaces in a vaulted basement, gives the opportunity for genuine seclusion if that’s what you’re looking for. And if you’re interested in cutting-edge cocktail making, you’re also in luck. Novel methods and unusual ingredients are used in many of their unique drinks, but they’re also unfailingly sound in the classics. We experienced slow service because they were understaffed that evening, but usually service is very efficient and always very friendly. The selection of spirits is both extensive, and outstanding. And the music is chosen by someone who has very good taste in jazz.  

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Artesian
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Artesian

Venue says: “Artesian is at the forefront of London's sophisticated bar scene, showcasing the city’s largest collection of rums, Champagne and cocktails.”

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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The Dog House
Bars and pubs

The Dog House

If this bar is the dog house, the proud pup owner is probably a pedigree. It’s a handsome room filled with stylish, rich-looking drinkers who settle into plush velvet chairs like it’s their second, no, third home. The decor is a bit ‘Dolce Vita’, since The Dog House resides beneath chic Italian restaurant Bernardi’s in Marylebone. High ceilings, black walls with gold embellishments and rich plum and mauve furnishings make this a striking space, with futurist artwork, vintage Italian posters and an impressively backlit bar all making the room pop that bit more. Candlelight and fresh blooms make it prettier. A narrow patio to the side has a few cast iron chairs for smokers, presumably on the menthol Vogues. A menu of negronis has been tailor-made to complete the fashionable feel. They’re a little dear at £10.50 each, but the quality can’t be questioned, with wide combinations of gin, vermouth and variable bitters. Each one comes made with quality Italian ingredients and your options include everything from a sloe gin version and a beer-topped twist. Try sipping slowly on the Rose Negroni – this thirst-quenching combo of rose vermouth, amaro and rose wine dressed with a pretty pansy on top didn’t stick around for long after it arrived at my table. There’s an equally impressive list of Italian-styled spritzes and martinis to dip into, if bitter isn’t your taste.  We had to hound staff a few times to put in our drink order and chase them down on the whereabouts of the bar cichet

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
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Hotels in Marylebone

The Zetter Townhouse Marylebone

The Zetter Townhouse Marylebone

As you walk through the front door of this archetypal London townhouse in Marylebone you could be forgiven for wondering if you’ve come in the right entrance (clue: you have, there’s only one). Immediately you’re right in the heart of Seymour’s Parlour, a visual assault on the senses where literally every available space is occupied by vintage furniture and fittings, paintings and antiques. Its dark red walls and period features only add to the feeling it’s been inspired by the Sir John Soane’s Museum in Lincoln’s Inn Fields (another clue confirming it has sits on the wall next to the bar). Drinks here are equal to the surroundings. Like the original Zetter in Clerkenwell, the hand of revered booze impresario Tony Conigliaro governs the list. Unusual ingredients and experimental drinks are the order of the day, and they’re up there with the best drinks in town. Take the Turf Club (£11.50), for example. A face-straightening mix of gin, dubonnet, grape reduction, Peruvian bitters and ‘grass’, it’s served straight up in a coupe and one sip will leave you smitten with this potent but well-balanced concoction.   It’s pretty much the dream to be able to stagger upstairs after a boozy night out, and the Zetter’s rooms continue the period feel with extravagant four-poster beds and trinkets in cabinets. Cosy bathrooms come with powerful showers, Ren products and nice little touches like a DAB radio. Rooms to the rear offer views out onto a quiet little mews and are very quiet consid

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
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The Landmark London

The Landmark London

This elegant redstone facing Marylebone station takes you back to an era when luxury travel was romantic, leisurely and almost certainly steam-powered. It’s London’s last grand Victorian hotel (it opened in 1899, just two years before Queen Vic passed away). You can see that in its excellent bone structure: especially the soaring atrium in the centre of the building, where visitors and Londoners nibble afternoon tea or breakfast underneath green potted palmtrees and a glass roof eight storeys above. Cucumber sandwiches at the Winter Garden are really special but The Landmark London’s less famous restaurant, TwoTwentyTwo, is pretty solid too. Service and food are excellent and unfussy, and prices are unexpectedly reasonable for a five-star joint. Grand hotels often understand comfort in a way that directional bars or restaurants don’t, and The Landmark London’s cocktail bar is outstanding: snug and sexy, with twisted classics that could give a lot of hip younger venues a real run for their money.   As well as nostalgic grandeur, it’s the attention to detail which makes this place worth the sizeable bill. It’s also brilliant for families. Family rooms accommodate four, and there are lots of thoughtful extras: child-sized bathrobes, all those toilet-training and bedtime necessities which you either forget to pack or hate carrying around with you, and – cutest of all – a readymade stripy play tent. The discreet spa and pool are soothing places to escape your nearest and dearest

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
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Rooms at The Grazing Goat
Hotels

Rooms at The Grazing Goat

For an upmarket but intimate stay, the eight rooms at the Grazing Goat gastropub are a safe bet. ‘Modern country house’ is the vibe the owners (Cubitt House) are going for: the rooms are classy but unfussy and feature some lovely extras, such as Aesop products and cafetières, while wifi and bottled water are free. The same aesthetic is carried through into the bar and restaurant downstairs. Guests can enjoy their meals in their rooms if they prefer.

Chiltern Firehouse Hotel
Hotels

Chiltern Firehouse Hotel

This Grade II-listed red-brick former fire station was for years the secret location of London’s most-anticipated new hotel. The key factor was André Balazs who, as the man behind the celeb-friendly Chateau Marmont in LA and New York’s Mercer, has a gift for creating exclusive hotels with incredible buzz. The see-and-be-seen restaurant opened first, under visionary chef Nuno Mendes, and was immediately block-booked; ditto the 26 refined suites, each a model of intelligent, comforting design, retro of course, but not stuck in the past. Service is relaxed but crisp – exemplified by the note alongside the phone in each room, replacing the usual bookof instructions, simplyinstructing one to ‘Dial 0 for anything’.

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Shops in Marylebone

The Conran Shop- Marylebone
Shopping

The Conran Shop- Marylebone

Spread over three floors of an old stable building, The Conran store offers an ecclectic mix of homeware including furniture, lighting, textiles and art. Gifts and books are also available as well as the Conran Kitchen, where shoppers can unwind with a coffee or lunch. Design classics can be found nestled in among innovative design and 'one-off' vintage pieces that blend practicality and fun. The centerpiece of the store is the top floor 'Ultimate Conran Apartment' - using roomsets to demonstrate the ideal Conran interior landscape. As featured in the 100 best shops in London

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
Green Valley
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Green Valley

Venue says: “Established in 1986, we are one of London’s largest, best-stocked and renowned Lebanese and Middle Eastern food hall and delicatessen !”

Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Gielly Green
Shopping

Gielly Green

You can tell a fair bit about a salon from the calibre of towel on offer. At this swish Marylebone hairdressers, founded by Fred Gielly and Shai Greenberg, they’re as thick as duvets and the colour of caramel highlights. That level of service runs through the whole establishment, which is darkly glossy and reassuringly expensive. Cuts cost up to £165 (although you can get a junior stylist for £70), but if you have the money to spend, it’s a great place to spend it. As well as the usual roster of cuts and colour, there is a spa-style beauty department, where you can go for a 120-minute facial, have your eyebrows threaded or treat your cuticles with a hot oil special.

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
KJ’s Laundry Marylebone
Shopping

KJ’s Laundry Marylebone

A favourite haunt of the consciously-uncoupled Gwyneth Paltrow, this small-but-perfectly-formed Marylebone boutique is home to understated, incredibly wearable labels. Founders Kate Allden and Jane Ellis track down soon to be cult classics before they become so by sourcing more under the radar brands, and then fill the store with stylish yet timeless pieces. and wardrobe classics. Its eponymous own-brand is predictably great.

Love London Awards: this year’s winners

Daisy Green
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Daisy Green

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
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Nordic Bakery
Restaurants

Nordic Bakery

Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Paul Smith
Shopping

Paul Smith

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
The Harcourt
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The Harcourt

Venue says: “Scandinavian heritage with relaxed, all-day modern-European dining and drinking that includes a nod to Nordic cuisine.”

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
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See the full results of this year’s Love London Awards

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