The best cheap eats in Singapore

We pick the best and most value-for-money dishes you can chow down for $10 or less in Singapore
Wanton Seng's Noodle Place
By Time Out Singapore editors |
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Dining out in Singapore can be expensive – but not if you know where to look. These lunch spots provide a satisfying meal for under $10. From set meals to our hawker favourites, these are the best cheap eats in the city. Here's helping you spend less on lunch so you can splurge on the things that matter.

RECOMMENDED: The 50 best cafés in Singapore and your 24-hour Singapore food tour

Restaurants, Indian

Dosai Set ($8.50)

icon-location-pin Rochor

At Komala Vilas 

Cutlery is optional for a gastronomic affair at Komala Vilas. We even urge you to literally get down and dirty with your (clean) fingers when digging into the Indian vegetarian restaurant’s Dosai Meal. Served with a trio of vegetables (sambar, chutney and kulambu) and a slew of curries and gravy accompaniments, the set’s star is clearly the massive dosai that is too large for even its plate. You can choose crispy paper dosai, or the masala potato option at no extra cost. Crisp at the edges, yet incredibly soft and chewy on the underside, the dosai is one gut-stuffing indulgent that is worth every cent. If the set’s too much to handle, you can order the masal dosai and paper dosai on their own at $3.90 and $4.20 respectively.

Restaurants, Singaporean

Roti Prata ($1)

icon-location-pin Geylang

Fickle-minded is Mr Mohgan who first gave many a panic attack by selling off his business out of the blue, before changing his mind and later opening up Mr and Mrs Mohgan’s Super Crispy Roti Prata version 2.0 at Tin Yeang Restaurant. While the beloved dough discs are generally known for offering a budget meal, the husband-wife duo’s roti prata is one you should try for its crackling crispiness. Savoured alone, but also fantanstic with curry, the roti prata also comes in various renditions such as the prata plaster ($1.50) that includes an egg with a runny yolk, and coin prata ($5 for six).

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Restaurants, Chinese

Char siu noodle, $7.50

icon-location-pin Tanjong Pagar

At Wanton, Seng's Noodle Place

Chinese comfort food at its best, you'll find all it all in a bowl of wonton mee here. It might cost a tad more than a standard bowl at any coffee shop but take a bite of the torched char siew, springy egg noodles, tender pork belly, and famous peppery boiled wontons (the recipe has a five-decade legacy) before you make your judgement. Of course more helpings of the chilli sauce, caddy of oils and lard crackers help as well. 

Time Out says
Restaurants, Korean

Spicy gojuchang chicken with rice, $8.90

icon-location-pin Chinatown

At DoSiRak

The fun part at DoSiRak is creating your own Korean-style lunch bowl that's healthy too. Pick your protein from options like our favourite, spicy chicken in gojuchang sauce, beef bulgogi, seared tuna and more. The standard serving packs white rice into the bowl, but add $1 and you get the option of brown rice and soba noodles too. Top it up with more add-ins like an onsen egg ($1) or avocado ($3) if you're feeling fancy. Remember to shake the box to mix the sauces properly before you settle down to eat. 

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Restaurants, Chinese

Dry chilli pan mee, $7.80

icon-location-pin Chinatown

At Chilli Pan Mee (Batu Rd)

The first branch to open outside its popular KL branch, the simply-named store along China Street still pulls the queues during lunch time. Their menu is simple with only a few main dishes but most go for one thing: the chilli pan mee. The make up of the dish is simple really, with handmade noodles, crunchy fried anchovies, shredded mushrooms, fried shallots, a runny egg and the main thing, the potent dry chilli. It also comes with a side of clear soup with sweet potato leaves to bring down the heat. Only downside is the long queue and wait so leave the office early.

Restaurants, Malay

Mutton Briyani, $6.50

icon-location-pin Rochor

At Zam Zam

While it's know for its special murtabak, the briyani is an underrated dish on the menu. Zam Zam makes its version Hyderabadi dum style where the meat is cooked together with the orange-flecked basmati, which makes the rice that much more fragrant. And then order a side of murtabal because it really is that good. 

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Restaurants, Singaporean

Dry laksa goreng, $8.50

icon-location-pin Rochor

At Old Chang Kee Cafe

We're familiar with the snack stands everywhere but for the first time, Old Chang Kee opens a proper sit-down retro restaurant serving some proper dishes. On the menu are local favourites like curry chicken and nasi lemak, as well as economical bee hoon, mee siam and more plus the real snack bar so you can top it off with your favourite curry puff or sotong ball. The stand out here is defitnitely the dry laksa goreng which tastes just as rich as the gravy version with huge chunks of chicken and shrimp. 

Restaurants, Taiwanese

Lu Rou Fan, $10

icon-location-pin Raffles Place

At The Salted Plum

Fans of Five Ten on South Bridge Road, you can breathe a sigh of relief. The Salted Plum is a reincarnation of the popular joint that pretty much sells the same thing at the same price of $5 or $10. There's the tender and unctuous lu rou ($10), pork belly is slow-cooked with spices that's also available as a rice bowl served with a sous vide egg and kai lan during lunch. Other popular sides include Taiwanese fried chicken ($10) and sausage patties ($10).

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Restaurants, Vietnamese

Sliced beef pho, $9.90

icon-location-pin Kallang

At Mrs Pho

Head over to this quaint Vietnamese restaurant to satisfy your pho cravings (even if you’re on a budget) – its best-selling sliced beef pho ($9.90) and chicken pho ($9.90) both come just under $10. Mrs Pho also serves up other value for money entrées like vegetarian fried rice ($9.90) and a Yaya Papaya Salad ($9.50) that comes topped with prawns and seasoned minced pork.  

Restaurants, Korean

Kimchi soup, $7.50

icon-location-pin Orchard

At Kim Dae Mun

Mains at this casual Korean restaurant range from $6.50-$10. Choose from a wide variety of protein-based options – fried saba fish ($8), spicy shredded chicken ($8) and cuttlefish ($9.50) to name a few – or order yourself a comforting bowl of kimchi soup ($7.50). Portions here are sufficiently generous but an additional $1.50 gets you an accompanying bowl of signature red bean rice.

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Two Men Bagel House
Two Men Bagel House
Restaurants, Cafés

Gypsy Ham, $10

icon-location-pin Raffles Place

At Two Men Bagel House

Bringing the bagel craze to our shores, Two Men Bagel House presents itself as a quick and affordable lunch option amid the otherwise pricey Central Business District. Here, the dense and chewy bread comes either savoury or sweet, with prices starting from $2.60. All-day breakfast bagels like the Gypsy Ham – a winning combo of black forest ham, crispy bacon, egg and hashbrown – and the Egg-Boca – egg salad, bacon jam, scallion, hippie greens and mayo – go at $10 each.

Wafuken
Photo: Gabe Chen

Chicken donburi, $8

At Wafuken

For healthy and affordable build-your-own bowls in the CBD, hit up Wafuken at either Asia Square Tower 2 or OUE Downtown Gallery. A plain donburi ($4) – choose between furikake Japanese brown rice or white rice – is served with onsen egg, daikon and cucumber pickles and you can choose to add on protein options like sous vide chicken breast ($4) to make a bowl that still comes in at under $10.

 

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Wheat

Bull Run Soba, $8

At Wheat Baumkuchen

This quick service healthy food joint has been a firm favourite among people working in Raffles Place for a long time. And now it's opened a new outlet at Marina One. The new outlet has more "Design Your Own Bowl" options but the Bull Run Soba ($8) is a no-brainer for when you're in a rush. Served with grilled teriyaki chicken, green soba and salad, this meal comes in at under 500 calories for those watching their weight.

 

Restaurants

Singapore-style ramen, $7-$9

icon-location-pin Raffles Place

At A Noodle Story

It’s got one of the longest queues at Amoy Street Food Centre, and for good reason. The ‘Singapore-style’ ramen the two young lads at this stall whip up is like a cross between wonton mee, mazesoba and magic. Over springy mee kia tossed with a moreish and slightly sweet chilli oil, they pile sous vide char siew, wontons, a potato-wrapped prawn, spring onion and an onsen egg.

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Restaurants, Malay

Nasi padang, from $4

icon-location-pin Geylang

At Hjh Maimunah

The queue at this nasi padang restaurant stretches out the door even before lunchtime hits. We can't blame the crowd, though, as only the early birds get the worm. Or in this case, stellar beef rendang and sambal goreng. Also, don't miss out on the tauhu telor that sells out fast. Aside from quintessential nasi padang dishes, there are also rarer ones like lemak siput sedut, sea snails swimming in a coconut-rich broth.

Tamoya, Udon
Photo: Ahmad Iskandar Photography
Restaurants, Japanese

Udon, $9.80

icon-location-pin Raffles Place

At Tamoya Udon

Clinching the ‘Best Udon Maker of Kagawa Prefecture’ in a Japanese TV show, Tamoya pulls thick wheat flour noodles that are a result of blending three types of flour and adjusting the amount of salt to our city’s humidity levels. Pick from hot or cold dishes – prices range from $5.80 to $13.40 a bowl, but only the beef, pork and curry udons will set you back more than $10. Once you’ve made your choice, pick up a veggie ($1) or prawn ($2.50) tempura to accompany your bowl. Our favourite? The pork sanuki udon ($9.80) – its light broth complements the salty-sweet pork perfectly.

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Sungei Road Laksa
Photo: Ahmad Iskandar Photography
Restaurants

Sungei Road Laksa, $3

icon-location-pin Rochor

At Sungei Road Laksa

The shop name says it all. With only one thing on the menu, this humble eatery still rakes in long queues every day. The laksa gravy, cooked over charcoal, is light and not too spicy – that’s what the sambal is for. Stir it in if you want more heat in your bowl ($3). Topped only with fishcake and plump cockles, you’ll polish off a bowl in under 5 minutes.

Restaurants

Yin yang chicken rice, $8.90

icon-location-pin Orchard

At Roost

Chicken rice stalls are a dime a dozen in Singapore, but it's not often you come across a place with its very own automated poultry cooking machine. The machine took 13 years to perfect and now dishes out consistently tender and fragrant birds each time. Roost's poached and soya sauce chicken rice ($8.90 each) are also healthier alternatives to the ones found at hawker centres – the rice is cooked with canola oil and comes in at under 500 calories per plate. Get the yin yang chicken rice ($8.90) for half portions of both types of chicken. If you're looking to indulge, try the chicken laksa ($7.90) and tom yum fried rice ($8.90) instead.

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Restaurants, Mexican

'Mini B' burrito, $7.90

icon-location-pin Raffles Place
At Guzman Y Gomez

It’s hard to beat Guzman’s price tag for a wholesome burrito that’s stuffed with rice, soft black beans, salsa, melted Jack cheese, and your choice of filling: mild or spicy grilled chicken, steak, fish, or roasted pork – there’s even a vegetarian option with sautéed onions, mushrooms and guacamole. We chose pan-seared fish, dressed in a tangy garlic-lime sauce that removed any hint of fishiness. You can pimp out your burrito with add-ons such as guacamole ($1) and brown rice ($0.50), too.
Restaurants

The Golden Pump soup, $6

icon-location-pin Raffles Place
At Soup Living

Each Cantonese-style, slow-fire soup here is made from premium Chinese herbs and is boiled without MSG or chicken stock cubes. There are currently six types of soups on the menu, including favourites like The Golden Pump ($6), a naturally sweet soup boiled from Australian golden butternut pumpkin, apricot kernels and dried scallops. Add $2.50 to complete your meal with a bowl of fluffy Japanese rice (or brown rice) topped with furikake or two pieces of handmade siew mai and a drink.
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