Best Andersonville restaurants

The Swedish neighborhood has all kinds of food, from Southern to Mexican and more. Here's where to eat in Andersonville.
Little Bad Wolf
Photograph: Jaclyn Rivas Little Bad Wolf
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Andersonville is best known for its Swedish roots, but the neighborhood's culinary scene is incredibly diverse. Want one of the city's best Mexican restaurants? Or a stellar Italian restaurant? Andersonville has those and more at some of the best restaurants Chicago has to offer.

RECOMMENDED: Our complete guide to Andersonville

Calamari alla Piastra
Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki
Restaurants, Italian

Anteprima

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What’s not to like about this Andersonville trattoria? It’s cute, it’s bustling, service is helpful, and the food borders between good and great. Year-round don’t-miss items include the tender, lemon-kissed grilled octopus; the salumi plate; and the value-packed antipasti platter. Like any good trattoria, Anteprima rotates much of the menu according to season, but housemade pastas prove as perfect with pancetta ragù in cold weather as they do with bright fava beans and ricotta in spring. In warm weather, seek out the secluded back patio.

Big Jones
Photograph: Jaclyn Rivas
Restaurants, Soul and southern American

Big Jones

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Paul Fehribach's exploration of Southern culinary history draws on historic recipes (like farmhouse chicken and dumplings, circa 1920) to tell the story of Southern cuisine. The collard green sandwich, with tender greens and cheddar tucked between fried corn pone, is a Native American dish, while crispy catfish a la Big Jones is lightly fried and served with grits and piccalilli. Brunch, which begins with complimentary beignets, is a similarly epic affair.

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Vegetarian Combo
Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki
Restaurants, Ethiopian

Lalibela

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The Andersonville restaurant serves excellent renditions of Ethiopian classics, including shuro, a delectable chickpea dish with a complex, gradual heat; yemisir azifah, cold lentils with a great piquant tang; and hearty duba wat, tender chunks of butternut squash in a gingery sauce. It's BYOB, so stop by In Fine Spirits before dinner.

Little Bad Wolf
Photograph: Jaclyn Rivas
Restaurants, Contemporary American

Little Bad Wolf

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The restaurant and bar gets packed on weekends and for obvious reasons—there's a good burger, a couple actually, though the Bad Burger, with two patties, American cheese, pickles and mayo is our pick. There's a bar vibe, so you'll want to try the solid lineup of local draft beers or housemade cocktails, like the charred negroni. And the rest of the menu is fleshed out with dishes like bao and fried shrimp, which you can't find elsewhere in Andersonville.

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Photograph: Jaclyn Rivas
Restaurants, American

m. henry

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At this adorable, sunny, daytime-only café, health food is tasty enough to eat. The owners are committed to organics and offer meat-free options, but they’re okay with a little cheese, butter and sugar every now and then. Case in point: thick blueberry pancakes and a heaping breakfast sandwich of fried egg, Gorgonzola, applewood-smoked bacon and fresh thyme. If that’s too good and gooey for you health nuts, there’s always the Vegan Epiphany, an organic tofu scramble that just may live up to its name.

Reza’s
Photograph: Andrew Nawrocki
Restaurants, Mediterranean

Reza's

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The sprawling restaurant excels at Middle Eastern classics: kashkeh bodemnjan blends eggplant with sweet, caramelized onions, garlic and mint for an addictive spread. The chicken koubideh is a delicious herbal kebab, and the fattoush is full of clean, sharp flavors. Go for the house-made baklava and Turkish coffee to finish the meal.

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Svea.venue.jpg
Photograph: Lindsey Parker
Restaurants, Swedish

Svea

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This Andersonville diner, decked out with Swedish folk art, serves plates packed with hearty food. The Viking Breakfast—two eggs, two Swedish pancakes with lingonberry compote, falukorv sausage, potatoes and toast—is our favorite hangover cure, but we’re just as happy with rib-sticking potato pancakes or Swedish meatballs later in the day. Note: It's cash only, so make sure to pop by an ATM before visiting.

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