Farringdon area guide

The best places to eat, drink and kip in lively Farringdon

The Quality Chop House dining room.jpg
The Quality Chop House

Sandwiched between Clerkenwell and the City, Farringdon is a popular after-work drinks destination. And to be fair the pubs are pretty decent around here. But don't limit yourself to the watering holes - this part of town is a world class food hub too, from the much lauded St John's (don't take your veggie first date here) to tiny tapas bar Morito and the atmospheric Quality Chop House. It's also the home of Smithfield Market - one of the largest meat markets in Europe and the little-known (and only occasionally open) Barts Pathology Museum. Plus for visitors to the city, it's a charming - and vibrant spot to stay. And a good alternative to well-trodden Soho or Covent Garden

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Best bits of Farringdon

14 reasons to go to Leather Lane, EC1
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14 reasons to go to Leather Lane, EC1

Don’t be fooled by its sartorial-sounding name: leather is no longer readily available here. Instead this scenic street, nestled between the hustle and bustle of Gray’s Inn and Farringdon Roads, and running parallel to the jewellery trade hub of Hatton Garden, is a haven for food lovers. Leather Lane mixes the best of traditional London with the new. Its down-to-earth weekday market – which has been operating for a staggering 400 years – is one of the city’s best and is constantly evolving, these days feeding the suited lunchtime worker crowd. Meanwhile innovative, independent, and – dare I say it – kind of hipstery restaurants and coffee shops are springing up on the street all the time. Surprisingly for somewhere so central, Leather Lane is also majorly residential, which has fostered a greater sense of community than you’ll find in most parts of the City. The Friends of Leather Lane Market group and Leather Lane Stars project work hard to preserve this; it’s them you can thank for helping to retain the lane’s unique character and independent spirit. Okay, yes, there is a Pret, a Subway and a Greggs, so you’re sorted for sandwiches – but apart from that, you’d be hard pressed to find any major chains setting up shop here. Drink this   A photo posted by Camylla Vitorio (@camytomylife) on Aug 5, 2016 at 8:16am PDT Microbrewed cask ales from the Sir Christopher Hatton, a cosy traditional pub with outdoor tables for those rare sunny days. Craft beer, obviously,

So you’ve never been to Barts Pathology Museum?
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So you’ve never been to Barts Pathology Museum?

Here’s our guide to the most morbid museum in London, as it opens its doors for free this month.   What’s the deal? Carla Valentine, technical curator at Barts Pathology Museum, is one of the pioneers of the ‘death positivity’ movement, which holds the idea that hiding death and dying behind closed doors does more harm than good. And, true to her ethos, she and her colleagues are inviting Londoners to explore this Victorian museum where the shelves are lined with human specimens in glass jars. Sounds terrifying. How do I get in? The museum’s archive is normally reserved for the nervous hands of medical students, who practise their slicing and dicing on cadavers. But London’s morbid secret is going to be accessible to the public for two rare open days this month. So what does this museum actually have on show? One vintage organ that calls Barts Pathology Museum home is a ‘tight lacer’s liver’ from 1907, deformed by the persistent tightening of corset strings. You can also see the photographs of Mia-Jane Harris, which capture the delicate minutiae of human eyes and other wet specimens suspended in preservative. Isn’t this all a bit too creepy? Barts isn’t about indulging in gallows humour. Valentine believes that seeing these remains can help ‘open up a dialogue about death, and what happens after we die’. So get ready for some cheery dinner-table chat. St Bartholomew’s Hospital. St Paul’s. Aug 8 and Aug 22, 1pm-4pm, reserve your place here. Free. Feeling adventurous? Try

Farringdon highlights

Fabric
Clubs

Fabric

Over its 16 years, Fabric has established itself as one of London's clubbing landmarks – a reputation built through consistently high quality programming that showcases all strands of the UK's electronic music underground. Located in a former meatpacking warehouse, the club's three rooms are brought to life every weekend with the finest low-frequencies and the deepest grooves in town, as the hip crowds that pack out the dancefloor will testify. FabricLive on Fridays is all about the bass, with regular sets from heavyweight drum 'n' bass don DJ Hype and his Playaz crew, alongside various other scene leaders from garage and dubstep, and rising UK bass producers playing throughout the club. Saturdays are usually led by long-standing Fabric DJs and programmers Craig Richards and Terry Francis, who bring in an A-list cast to relay techno, house, disco, Italo, minimal and other deep, hypnotic grooves. You might find Chilean-German techno warrior Ricardo Villalobos playing one of his legendary extended sets, or perhaps a Chicago house legend ripping things up, or even the finest new DJ talent from around the globe at parties like Daniel Avery's Divided Love.Things don't slow down on Sundays, either: Long-running weekly party WetYourSelf fires up at 11pm every Sunday, offering all kinds of deep house, funky techno, cosmic disco and Italo grooves until 8am on Monday morning. Whatever your taste in clubs and clubbing, Fabric is bound to have something for you, making it an essential s

Users say
4 out of 5 stars
St John
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St John

Fergus Henderson and Trevor Gulliver’s restaurant – now the heart of a mini-empire with branch, bakery and wine dealership – has been praised to the skies for reacquainting the British with the full possibilities of native produce, and especially anything gutsy and offal-ish. Perhaps as influential, however, has been its almost defiantly casual style: a Michelin-starred restaurant for people who run from the very idea. The mezzanine dining room in the former Smithfield smokehouse has bare white walls, battered floorboards and tables lined up canteen-style; the downstairs bar, with superb snacks, is equally basic. The staff are able to chat without allowing anything to go off-track. St John’s cooking is famously full-on, but also sophisticated, concocting flavours that are delicate as well as rich. Black cuttlefish and onions was extraordinary, arriving in a supremely deep-flavoured ink-based sauce with a hint of mint; ox tongue was perfectly cooked to bring out every taste and texture, and served with fantastic horseradish. This is powerful cooking, so if you go for a full dinner, including the great neo-traditional puds, leave time for digestion. Wines – all French, many under St John’s own label, are on the pricey side, but you can also order good beers from the attached bar. Many diners prefer the no-bookings bar for its more casual vibe and reasonable prices.  

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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The Zetter Townhouse Clerkenwell

The Zetter Townhouse Clerkenwell

Just so you know, you’re not staying in a hotel when you stay at Clerkenwell’s Zetter Townhouse. Instead you’re lodging at the home of your beloved, slightly dotty Great Aunt Wilhelmina – 200 years ago. She travels the world picking up souvenirs: taxidermy, Oriental rugs and tinctures in dark brown bottles to display throughout her 13-bedroom Clerkenwell residence. When you walk in, the focal point is not a check-in desk. It’s a big apothecary-style counter, full of homemade cordials and infusions. This is Great Aunt Wilhelmina’s front room, and she likes to entertain. A member of her staff hands you a sweet gin cocktail – The Flintlock –  with a bang. Literally: a small explosion on the side of the glass complements the gunpowder tea tincture in it (she’s got molecular drinks scene don Tony Conigliaro on board to design the cocktail menu). A short walk from central London, The Zetter Townhouse is a local hotspot for its Cocktail Lounge alone – half its clientele are locals. Walls are a deep, rich red that’s mostly covered with a mishmash of paintings, from matronly portraits to British bulldogs stencilled over the Union Jack. Under a glass tabletop are relics of a British upbringing: OXO cubes, shells, 30cm rulers. Upstairs, rooms are the definition of cosy, with extra blankets and hot water bottles in knitted covers on the Egyptian cotton sheets of four-poster beds. Décor is the same as downstairs, eclectic British through the decades, peppered with wit, and a tastefully

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Smithfield Market
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Smithfield Market

Smithfield Market (also known as London Central Market) provides a colourful link to an age when the quality of British beef was a symbol of national virility and good humour. Designed by Horace Jones, Smithfield opened for business in 1868 and early risers will still find meat and poultry (though no livestock) traders setting up their stalls at first light inside the metal structure with its ornate arched ceiling and bizarre colour scheme (white, purple, blue and green). Nowadays Smithfield is also notable for its swanky eateries, odd neighbour, club Fabric.

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5 out of 5 stars
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Restaurants in Farringdon

Club Gascon
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Club Gascon

Please note, Club Gascon is closed for refurbishment until Autumn 2017. Time Out Eating editors, Aug 2017. The presence of the three-strong Gascon group (as well as Comptoir Gascon, there’s wine at Le Bar) ensures that a small area of east-central London has a flavour of south-west France. This is the most expensive of the trio, a Michelin-starred sanctuary of haute cuisine. Heavy wooden screens shut out the world; inside is a serene and urbane room of greys and golds with marble panels. Head chef Pascal Aussignac is from Toulouse, and the hallmarks of the area’s cuisine shine through in his food, although it’s given the fancifications this level of restaurant requires. A playful approach means many dishes come with descriptions in inverted commas or feature unusually prepared ingredients. Flavour combinations are bold, which adds to the sense of occasion, and the technique is flawless; perhaps less so the tendency to unorthodox plating. However, everything else was note-perfect.  

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Morito
Restaurants

Morito

The downside of this diminutive tapas bar, little sister of Moro next door, is its unceasing popularity. You can’t book for dinner (though you can for lunch), which, unless you have the timing of Eric Morecambe, almost always means a wait – though staff are happy for you to decamp elsewhere and will phone as soon as space becomes free. The upside is that the food is fantastic, the staff delightful and the atmosphere properly buzzing, as everyone is so pleased to be there. The high stools next to the bright orange bar offer the best view of the action, and are marginally more comfortable than the oddly low tables – but in general it’s a cramped experience. Do sample as many dishes as you can from the 40-strong list. Everything we tried was superb, from the very simple (tomato toast, lip-tingling pádron peppers) to old faves (patatas bravas topped with a thick, spicy tomato sauce and dollop of mayo) and regional specialities (grilled Galician tetilla cheese, with membrillo and walnut halves, and sizzling Palamós prawns with allioli). Desserts include a first-rate crema catalana (large enough for two), but the rich, boozy baklava ice-cream floating in a pool of Pedro Ximénez – the result of a happy kitchen accident, apparently – takes some beating. To drink, there are cocktails, sherries and an all-Spanish wine list, available by the glass, 375ml carafe or bottle.  

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Sosharu
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Sosharu

You know how Kris Jenner names daughters? As in, Kourtney, Khloe, Kim, Kylie and Kendall (where have you been, living under a rock?). Well, that’s how acclaimed chef Jason Atherton names his restaurants. He likes to keep things ‘Social’, from Pollen Street Social to Social Wine and Tapas, or my personal favourite, Social Eating House. Luckily for Atherton, that’s where the comparison with the Kardashians ends, because unlike the internet-breaking attentionistas, the Social family are restrained and intelligent, and this latest baby is no different. What is different is the cuisine: Sosharu serves modern Japanese. But then, you’d already guessed that. They’ve done the smart thing and carved up the room’s industrial proportions using suspended wooden beams (kind of like eating in a giant four-poster bed) and Oriental lattice screens for intimacy. Do check out the counter bar (outstay your allotted two hours and you’ll be moved here anyway), so you can watch metal-chopstick-wielding chefs arrange the fiddliest of ingredients with astonishingly steady hands. It’ll make you want to jump up and challenge them to a game of Operation (don’t: you’ll only lose). Every plate is a thing of beauty, its flavours as intriguing. Take the must-order ‘open’ tuna temaki, (pictured above): a twist on a traditional handroll, the seaweed wrapper comes tempura-battered (it really works) and set into a ‘U’ shape, much like a hard taco. It’s then filled with perfect sushi rice, raw tuna, shredded s

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Quality Chop House
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Quality Chop House

The Quality Chop House carries deliberate echoes of its 19th-century origins by offering ‘a chop and a glass’ or a two-course and coffee ‘daily lunch’ for £15. Not quite the generosity of the original ‘plate of meat, bread and half a pint of ale for six pence’, but well-priced quality nonetheless. Wine rather than ale is the main draw now (though Kernel beer is offered). There’s a wine shop alongside the bar and dining room, with plenty to interest both casual sippers and serious imbibers. Mainly Old World with good regional representation, the list takes in interesting New World wines, not least on the ‘collector’s list’. Failing a Hatton Gardens’ salary, explore the by-the-glass selection; our £6 choices from Portugal and the southern Rhône were fresh and characterful. Knowledgeable buying is evident in the food too: well-sourced British fish, meat and artisan cheeses, heritage tomatoes and carrots, and Tuscan lardo di colonnata, which, on our last visit, was draped over a fillet of gurnard to good effect, served with creamed brown butter. Flavours are punchy: own-cured wild salmon was doused in unsweet mustard; tiny carrots came dressed with truffled tunworth cheese. Desserts also seemed geared to masculine palates; a chocolate mousse proved a deep glassful of dense ganache. Of a piece, perhaps, with the traditional decor of black and white chequerboard floor and dark wooden furniture – though the wine bar can be a light, bright option on a sunny day.  

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Bars and pubs in Farringdon

Jerusalem Tavern
Bars and pubs

Jerusalem Tavern

The Jerusalem is both fabulously historic and a complete fabrication. Although the premises date from the early 18th century, the current shopfront wasn’t added until 1810 and the place didn’t open as a pub until the 1990s.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Oriole
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Oriole

This is the second time I’ve found myself twitching on the RSPB’s website. But it had to be done because the team behind celebrated City cocktail spot Nightjar (as in the squat, nocturnal songbird) have gone and opened another avian-named bar, this one in Smithfield. This particular species is an enigmatic creature with exotic green and yellow plumage, so we’re in no doubt: Oriole is Nightjar’s showy little sister.  Oriole bears some of the same ‘speakeasy’ hallmarks. It’s already impossible to get a table at short notice and we were held at the door until radioed in, when a golden curtain was pulled back to reveal a darkened staircase. It is a lovely curtain, though. And there is a certain theatricality to entering this beauty of a basement bar. Flashes of on-theme jade and gold in leather and fur furnishings punctuate the room, while a stunning print of a tropical, palm-tree-covered landscape adorns one of the walls.  Naturally, a drink here comes at quite a cost. There’s a cover charge for jazz – dearer than it is at Nightjar and harder to avoid, since the music here kicks off at 8.30pm (though it is free on Monday and Tuesday). We also found fault with the bar food: a tempting menu shows promise, but black truffle croquettes (£5) had a sad, gloopy texture and sea bass ceviche (£6.50) lacked depth of flavour. But, of course, you come here for the drinks – and they are so on the money, with cocktails as creative as any you’ll find in London. They’re set out across three

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Old Red Cow
Bars and pubs

Old Red Cow

The old red cow herself, if she wasn’t apocryphal, probably didn’t have a pleasant visit to this pub’s manor – Long Lane was an ancient cattle route to Smithfield meat market. You can see the cupolas, domes and reliefs of London’s temple of butchery through the front windows of this refurbed Victorian site, which no longer uses its antique ‘Ye Olde’ prefix and has turned its focus to serving very good beer.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Fox & Anchor
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Fox & Anchor

Pristine mosaic tiling and etched glass scream ‘sensitive refurbishment’ from the moment you arrive at this stalwart. Inside, the dark wood bar is lined with pewter tankards (don’t expect to be given one if you want to drink outside); to the back is the Fox’s Den, a series of intimate booths used for both drinking and dining.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
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Cafes in Farringdon

Prufrock Coffee
Restaurants

Prufrock Coffee

This big, comfortable room doesn’t seem to alter much from year to year, and that’s fine with us. It does change during the week: most customers are a bit hurried from Monday to Friday, but everyone is very relaxed at the weekend. You never know who’s going to be here from one visit to the next, as the clientele is so pleasantly varied; you’re as likely to see a family with young kids as EC-sophisticates or office workers. There’s not much to say about the coffee except that it’s as good as it’s always been – and that means very good indeed, some of the best in London. Espresso is perfect, and guest beans slow-brewed in an Aeropress are always of excellent quality. There’s a small selection of daily dishes chalked on a blackboard, and sandwiches and baked things on the counter. Whenever you visit, expect to be very well looked after. Note: This was the second branch of Prufrock. The first, in Shoreditch, has closed down. The Time Out Food and Drink Team.  

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Workshop Coffee Co
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Workshop Coffee Co

Perhaps better known for its coffee (roasted on site), Workshop has extended its opening hours, and now serves food into the evening. On the ground floor, tables are close together, with the coffee roaster and large barista counter occupying a big chunk of the space. In the evening, a good selection of bar snacks (pig-skin grissini with apple sauce, corn ‘frittettes’ with spiced yoghurt) is served here, while upstairs there’s a short dinner menu. From this, the Dexter burger looked like a cartoon version, with a picture-perfect brioche bun, a slab of comté and some chipotle mayo. Deep-fried ratte potatoes were a treat. Wild mushroom pithivier was nicely crisp, and accompanied by pea laksa. Breakfasts are just as tempting: toasted banana bread, with date and orange jam and espresso mascarpone, for example. Decor is spacious and light, with long tables for groups and an elegant bar; industrial exposed brick is softened by flower arrangements on each wooden tabletop. Finish with a house roast, such as Juana Mamani from Bolivia.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Dose Espresso
Restaurants

Dose Espresso

Dose is a micro-dose, with seating for about a dozen bodies, but it was still a bit of a shock to see it nearly full at 10.30am. The clientele is diverse, ranging through suits, the Clerkenwell cool crowd and staff from nearby St Bart’s. Some very tempting food includes imaginative sandwiches, as in organic ciabatta with dry-cured bacon, grilled halloumi and spiced avocado. Sweet things also beckon – the cheesecake is a killer – and there’s also own-made muesli and yoghurt fruit compotes. Tea, taken very seriously here, is offered either hot or cold. A cold lemongrass was expertly brewed and had exactly the right (tiny) amount of sugar added. Coffee beans come from Square Mile, but there’s a changing selection of guest espresso. On our visit it was a single-estate washed Colombian, which was sensationally good: deep berry flavours and velvety-smooth. Had the crema been a little more sprightly, this would have been a candidate for espresso of the year. A small complaint in the context of a mega-dose of quality.  

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
Department of Coffee & Social Affairs
Restaurants

Department of Coffee & Social Affairs

DCSA gets very busy during the week, while weekends are relaxed. We’re particularly fond of the fabulously unkempt brickwork, which might make you think you’re in a building site rather than a coffee bar. Other pleasures include good but unobtrusive music, and the warmest service you could ask for. All the coffee begins as espresso and is always well made, from beans provided by a range of roasters. The machine is well tended to between coffees, and milk is foamed, poured and decorated carefully. Food is simple and high quality: a handful of sandwiches and a lovely spread of baked goods, some made here and others bought in. Our only grumble – unchanged from previous visits – is that our espresso could have been hotter. All staff need to do is heat the cups, for heaven’s sake. But this is hardly a unique problem, and certainly not enough to keep us away.  

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars

Hotels in Farringdon

Rookery

Rookery

Wander down the alleyways of Clerkenwell and you'll eventually find The Rookery, its door so satisfyingly hidden we walked past it twice. Once inside, wood-panelled walls lead to an antique reception desk, where guests check in to this playful boutique hotel: a converted Georgian townhouse, heavy with local history and as far from luxury chain monotony as you can get.  It's impossible not to fall under The Rookery’s spell. Like the slinky house cat who winds around the furniture, the place feels elegant and full of secrets. Lady Grey purred proudly as she showed us around the nooks of the library and into the sitting room, with its decadent honesty bar. Antique armchairs slept around an open fire. Afternoon cakes appeared as if from nowhere. And the magic continued up into the warren-like, art-filled corridors of 33 individually decorated large bedrooms (plus a few hidden doors, I’m sure of it). Our room was dominated by a magnificent four-poster bed and a huge clawfoot bath with brass fittings. I could have done without the twee lace curtains, but the overflowing bookshelves of leather-bound books were a great distraction. While the decor is dialled to eighteenth-century glamour, modernity is definitely not forgotten. Local ‘on trend’ brands stock the minibar, REN toiletries soothe weary time-travellers, and wifi bounces off the marble surfaces throughout the hotel. There's no restaurant, but that’s no problem considering the location in one of London’s major foodie distr

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
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The Zetter Hotel

The Zetter Hotel

Zetter is a fun, laid-back, modern hotel with some interesting design notes. There’s a refreshing lack of attitude and a forward-looking approach, with friendly staff and firm eco-credentials (such as free Brompton bikes for guests’ use). The rooms, stacked up on five galleried storeys around an impressive atrium, look into an intimate and recently refreshed bar area. They are smoothly functional, but cosied up with choice home comforts such as hot-water bottles and old Penguin paperbacks, as well as having walk-in showers with REN smellies. The downstairs is home to Club Zetter, while the fabulous Zetter Townhouse, in a historic building just across the square, has a fantastic cocktail bar and far cuddlier rooms with a hip vintage feel.

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
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The Clerk & Well Pub and Rooms

The Clerk & Well Pub and Rooms

Located in the trendy area of Clerkenwell, The Clerk & Well Pub and Rooms offers a restaurant, a bar and en suite accommodation with free WiFi. The property is just 8 minutes’ walk from Farringdon Station. All the rooms at The Clerk & Well Pub and Rooms feature a seating area and a Smart TV with free Netflix movies. The en suite bathrooms come with free toiletries, bathrobes and slippers. Tea/coffee making facilities are also available in the rooms. Excellent Pan-Asian food is served for lunch and dinner at the restaurant. Guests can also unwind enjoying a drink at the pub. Local market and amenities can be found in the area. Nearby popular attractions include St Paul’s Cathedral and the British Museum, both within 18 minutes’ walk. London Heathrow Airport is just over 1 hour away by public transport.

Users say
4 out of 5 stars
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Fox & Anchor

Fox & Anchor

Check in at the handsome attached boozer and you’ll be pointed to the separate front entrance for the hotel, with its lovely floor mosaic, leading to a handful of well-appointed, atmospheric and surprisingly luxurious rooms. All are different, but the high-spec facilities (big flatscreen TV, roll-top bath and drench shower) and quirky attention to detail (bottles of ale in the minibar, the ‘Nursing hangover’ privacy signs) are common throughout. Expect some clanking noise in the early mornings as the traders roll in, but proximity to the historic Smithfield meat market also means you get a feisty fry-up in the morning in the pub.

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Love London Awards: this year's winners

Morito
Restaurants

Morito

The downside of this diminutive tapas bar, little sister of Moro next door, is its unceasing popularity. You can’t book for dinner (though you can for lunch), which, unless you have the timing of Eric Morecambe, almost always means a wait – though staff are happy for you to decamp elsewhere and will phone as soon as space becomes free. The upside is that the food is fantastic, the staff delightful and the atmosphere properly buzzing, as everyone is so pleased to be there. The high stools next to the bright orange bar offer the best view of the action, and are marginally more comfortable than the oddly low tables – but in general it’s a cramped experience. Do sample as many dishes as you can from the 40-strong list. Everything we tried was superb, from the very simple (tomato toast, lip-tingling pádron peppers) to old faves (patatas bravas topped with a thick, spicy tomato sauce and dollop of mayo) and regional specialities (grilled Galician tetilla cheese, with membrillo and walnut halves, and sizzling Palamós prawns with allioli). Desserts include a first-rate crema catalana (large enough for two), but the rich, boozy baklava ice-cream floating in a pool of Pedro Ximénez – the result of a happy kitchen accident, apparently – takes some beating. To drink, there are cocktails, sherries and an all-Spanish wine list, available by the glass, 375ml carafe or bottle.  

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Exmouth Market
Shopping

Exmouth Market

Twenty years ago this small, pedestrianised street was still a big bloomers and veg stall sort of market. The resurgence of the food stalls began around 2006, in the wake of a French market introduced the preceding December by Islington Council. After this one-off event, Exmouth Market Traders Association realised the possibilities. A few stallholders from the weekend Broadway Market also seized the opportunity to operate from Monday to Friday at Exmouth Market, and after a few years of winnowing out the me-too sourdough sellers, there are now many excellent stalls serving a great variety of takeaway food to satisfy omnivorous and vegetarian appetites. Regulars might include Spinach & Agushi (Ghanaian stews), Pasean pastas, Mac & Cheese,  Meat Head BBQ, La Cochinita Spanish dishes, and Freebird burritos, among others.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
Sadler's Wells
Theatre

Sadler's Wells

Purpose-built in 1998 on the site of the original seventeenth-century theatre of the same name, this dazzling complex is home to an impressive line-up of local and international dance talent. While remaining accessible in its programme, Sadler's Wells puts on strong, often critically acclaimed, shows that cover tango, flamenco (watch out for the annual Flamenco Festival), hip hop, classical and contemporary ballet as well as Matthew Bourne's special brand of populist dance. The Angel venue's name dates back to the 1680s when the theatre discovered a medicinal well whose water was said to have health-giving properties. You can still look down the well today, though the days of taking a quick dip before a show are long gone. In addition to the main theatre, the smaller Lilian Baylis Studio offers smaller-scale new works and works in progress, while the Peacock Theatre (on Portugal Street in Holborn) operates as a satellite venue.

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
The White Bear
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The White Bear

This is a family-run pub offering Cask Marque real ales and a simple menu of standard pub-grub dishes. Though closed at weekends, it is available for private hire. 

Users say
5 out of 5 stars
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