Things to do in New York this Friday

It’s time to punch out, wind down and start your weekend off right with the best things to do in New York this Friday
Brooklyn Bowl
By Time Out New York editors and Jennifer Picht
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Don’t blow your weekend by spending Friday night on the couch—there are too many incredible things to do in New York this Friday. Whether you want to rage at one of the best parties in NYC or if you’re interested in checking out free comedy shows, you have unlimited options. That’s why we decided to make the planning process easier for you by selecting the very best events that are guaranteed to show you a good time. Forget road trips, the best way to spend your Friday night is right here in NYC.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to things to do in NYC this weekend

Movies to see this Friday

Suspiria
Alessio Bolzoni/Amazon Studios
Movies, Horror

Suspiria

Luca Guadagnino's creative and creepy spin on the horror classic finds moves of its own

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Movies, Thriller

Burning

Unfolding with grace and precision, Lee Chang-dong’s slowburn Korean mystery is beautifully executed

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Photo: Netflix
Movies, Documentary

Shirkers

Sandi Tan reckons with the indie film she almost made as a teen—and the man who stole it

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Movies, Horror

Halloween

Michael Myers is back in a fierce update that turns Jamie Lee Curtis into a force of nature

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Movies, Drama

A Star is Born

Lady Gaga is a revelation in the rebooted fame tragedy, infusing the material with soulfulness

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Photo: Keith Bernstein
Movies, Drama

A Private War

Rosamund Pike brings complex, earthy commitment to the role of late war correspondent Marie Colvin

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Movies, Documentary

Bisbee '17

In a Faustian bargain struck way back in 1917, the lawmen of Bisbee, Arizona, a small town on the Mexican border, rounded up approximately 1,300 copper miners—most of them immigrants on strike—to load them on cattle cars and deport them. Decades later, in 1975, the mining company shut down, turning that original sin on its head and leaving behind an economic hole into which the deporters’ grandchildren stumbled. No one thrives in Bisbee anymore, not even the tour guides. It would be enough for any documentary to tell this piece of hushed-up history, but Bisbee ’17 is onto something more radical; watching it is like witnessing the defusing of a time bomb from a foot away. For some reason (maybe it’s the presence of the camera crew itself), the guilt-stricken residents of today’s Bisbee have decided to re-create the incident on the day of its 100th anniversary. Descendants of the original evictors, including a pair of brothers whose elders were on opposite sides, cosplay with rifles and scowls, while local actors take to the streets chanting labor slogans (among them, Fernando Serrano, a gay Mexican-American who comes to symbolize much more than century-old socialism). How filmmaker Robert Greene got an entire town to ham it up remains a mystery, but his gift for inviting self-interrogation (also on display in his equally fascinating Kate Plays Christine, a 2016 hybrid about an actor’s plunge into the life of a suicidal newscaster) marks him as an innovator who may become a f

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Movies, Comedy

Crazy Rich Asians

“We’re comfortable” says Nick Young (Henry Golding, mega-confident in his feature debut), a handsome Oxford-educated NYU professor, when he’s asked about his background by Rachel (Fresh Off the Boat’s Constance Wu), who knows nothing about how loaded he is after a year of their dating. Like Rachel, we’re a touch taken aback about nonchalant he is, especially when “comfortable” turns out to be a fortune, but Nick isn’t snobby about it—it’s just family money. Meet the family. Crazy Rich Asians, the 2013 literary sensation by Kevin Kwan, is finally a Hollywood movie, the first with an all-Asian cast and director since Wayne Wang’s The Joy Luck Club 25 years ago. Seeing this kind of onscreen representation is incredibly satisfying, especially via Kwan’s rich page-turner (loosely based on the author's real life), loaded with cattiness but also plenty of Asian diversity, from wholesome friends and wise confidantes to jealous mean girls and scheming parents. Fittingly, the movie follows suit: It’s a reinvented romantic comedy, sassy and fun, that doesn’t necessarily rely on obvious tropes and is worth the wait. In a deeper way, Crazy Rich Asians is truly groundbreaking (especially now, in our xenophobic moment), paying attention to cultural nuances that rarely make the multiplex. To hear your mother’s regional Chinese dialect spoken in a major Hollywood film is an occasion for no small amount of pride. Nick plans a trip back home to luxurious Singapore for his best friend’s weddin

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Movies, Thriller

Searching

What to call this fiercely original movie? A Facebook thriller? A Google noir? Uniquely, the missing-girl mystery at its heart plays out almost entirely on computer screens, using social media apps and chatrooms in the same way Raymond Chandler used dive bars and dark alleys. The footprints being followed here are the digital kind, and they’re all the scarier for that. You’ll walk away with a new awareness of just how exposed we are to malign forces online. If you’re a parent, it may feel like a horror movie. The missing girl is L.A. high-schooler Margot Kim (Michelle La), a 15-year-old budding musician who seems like any other well-adjusted, plugged-in teen. But in a touching, Up–like opening montage of family photos and videos, we toggle through her childhood years and discover a sorrow that lingers like a shadow over her life and the film. When Margot vanishes without trace, her dad, David (John Cho, terrific), turns to her search history for clues as to her whereabouts. He quickly finds out that things are not what they’ve seemed. Not even close. From here, debut director Aneesh Chaganty shifts through the gears, dropping in the odd tension-breaker (look out for a killer Justin Bieber gag) and enough visual trickery to keep his extremely limited conceit cinematic. Strip away Searching’s tech trappings, though, and you’ll find the same propulsive joys that fueled classic ’90s thrillers like The Fugitive and The Game: red herrings, a tireless detective (played here by Deb

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