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Nicole-Marie Ng

Nicole-Marie Ng

Nicole-Marie Ng is Time Out's former Singapore Editor.

Articles (154)

The most romantic restaurants in Singapore

The most romantic restaurants in Singapore

It doesn't have to be a special occasion to treat your partner to a romantic meal. There's a time to dine with big groups and there's a time to eat on a budget but when you're planning an anniversary or a special date night out and about town, it's best to take it up a notch with a proper sit-down dinner with all the trimmings. Here are our picks of the best value-for-money, romantically lit restaurants to wine and dine in Singapore. Let's get in the mood for love.  RECOMMENDED: Best sustainable-dining restaurants in Singapore and the best rooftop bars in Singapore

The best steamboat and hot pot restaurants in Singapore

The best steamboat and hot pot restaurants in Singapore

Perfect for rainy days, reunion dinners or just because, a bubbling hot pot meal always satisfies. From the flavourful broth and an extensive range of ingredients to a host of side dishes and customisable sauces, the hot pot experience offers an irreplicable sense of communion between friends and loved ones. So if it's time for another catch-up session with your makan kakis, here's where to go.  RECOMMENDED: The best supper spots in Singapore and The best healthy restaurants in Singapore    

The restaurants with the best views of Singapore

The restaurants with the best views of Singapore

A meal with a view – be it of Singapore's stunning landscape or your hot date – is one of the best ways to spend a couple of hours. Even if you're single or out with colleagues, there are plenty of restaurants around Marina Bay and the CBD that offer both good food and sparkling vistas. Pull up a seat by the waterfront or ride an elevator up for a bird's-eye take on the city at these restaurants. RECOMMENDED Done with dinner? Head up to these rooftop bars in the city. These romantic restaurants in Singapore also know how to set the tone.

The best Chinese restaurants in Singapore

The best Chinese restaurants in Singapore

Throw a stone and it'll most likely land at the doorstep of one of the many Chinese restaurants in Singapore. We've got traditional outlets like Beng Hiang that have been around since our grandparents' youth as well as modern digs like Yue Bai and Birds of a Feather by young chefs looking to reinterpret their culinary history. Here are our picks on the best Chinese restaurants to visit in Singapore. RECOMMENDED: The best traditional Chinese dialect restaurants in Singapore and the best modern Chinese restaurants in Singapore

The best bars for non-alcoholic drinks in Singapore

The best bars for non-alcoholic drinks in Singapore

Artificial. Sickly sweet. Usually served with a wedge of unripe pineapple. Mocktails certainly don’t have the best reputation among discerning drinkers. But what happens when you don’t feel like drinking and are dragged for a post-work pub gathering with the colleagues? Steer them to these bars and their wide range of non-alcoholic beverages instead. We've done the sip test and here are some of our favourites that are just as inspiring as their spiked cousins. RECOMMENDED: 50 best bars in Singapore and Dry January is more than just another fad

The best healthy restaurants in Singapore

The best healthy restaurants in Singapore

If we could have our way, we'll have good food all day, every day. But not everything that tastes good, is good for you. For those who dread vegetables and healthy food, you'll be pleased to know that it's more to it than just chicken breast and a mountain of mesclun. Variety is key and that's where these places excel. The next time you find yourself staring at your boring desk salad, think about all the other healthy food options available to you instead. Whether you're in the CBD or in the heartlands, these healthy restaurants all around the city help meet your #eatclean goals – without boring you. RECOMMENDED: The best vegetarian and vegan restaurants in Singapore and the best vegetarian local food in Singapore

The best craft beer bars in Singapore

The best craft beer bars in Singapore

Craft beer has definitely come a long way since POTUS Jimmy Carter legalised US Homebrewing but it wasn’t really till 1980 when Sierra Nevada perfected the Pale Ale. Fast forward to recent years, the US now has over 7,000 craft breweries in operation with no sign of slowing down. Now, this global phenomenon has gained real traction in Singapore over the decade with plenty of local microbreweries brewing up a storm while dedicated purveyors of craft beers import an excitable range of craft beers from around the globe to cater to all hopheads alike. So for all y'all hop-lovin' folks out there, here is a comprehensive list of where to go for the craft beers and get yourself acquainted with the freshest hop juice on the island.  RECOMMENDED: The best new bars in Singapore to have a drink at in the city and the 50 best bars in Singapore

The best supper spots in Singapore for late-night dining

The best supper spots in Singapore for late-night dining

Some calls can't go unanswered – we’re talking about those late-night stomach growls that you can’t shake off with a protein bar or fruit. Well, well, if you're living in Singapore, one thing's for sure. You'll never go hungry at any time of the day, whether it's 4pm or 4am. For something more substantial (and delicious), saunter down to these 24-hour joints and restaurants that open till late for some post-OT or just a dirty supper with friends. There's nothing worse than going to bed hangry and unsatisfied. RECOMMENDED: Guide to Singapore after dark and the best late-night massage parlours in Singapore

The 50 best bars in Singapore

The 50 best bars in Singapore

Welcome to the Time Out Drink List, our handpicked ‘best of’ Singapore’s drinking scene. These are the most buzzing bars in this city right now: the most inventive and most memorable watering holes, all ranked by expert local editors. Drinking in Singapore is expensive so we did all the hard work for you – scouring the city every night in search of amazing drinks. Whether you sip or quaff, these are the city's top bars for a boozy night out. We've got joints stocked with quality vino, speakeasies hidden behind unmarked doors, dens devoted to whisky, craft beer breweries and much more in our roundup. We guarantee you won't be able to stop at one drink – just make sure you have a safe ride home. Disclaimer – the numbered list isn't a representation of any form of ranking.  Drank somewhere on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDrinkList. You can also find out more about how Time Out makes recommendations and reviews bars here.

The 50 best restaurants in Singapore you must try

The 50 best restaurants in Singapore you must try

Welcome to the Time Out Eat List, our handpicked best of Singapore’s food scene. These are the tastiest places to eat in this city right now: the freshest, most inventive and most memorable, ranked by expert local editors. You don't have to look very far to stumble upon an amazing dish in Singapore. The city is packed with boundary-pushing restaurants run by star-studded chefs as well as humble hawker finds that'll satiate your appetite for cheap. Narrowing down the best restaurants in town to a list of 50 is no easy feat – that's why we have separate lists for the best Japanese, French and Spanish restaurants among others – but these are the places we think are worth a visit for unbeatable food, electrifying ambience and genial service to boot. Eaten somewhere on this list and loved it? Know of a restaurant that should be on here instead? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutEatList Find out more about how Time Out makes recommendations and reviews restaurants

The best wine bars in Singapore

The best wine bars in Singapore

Whether you're looking for a bottle of Old World or New, biodynamic and natural or cheap and under $30, these wine bars in Singapore are making alcoholic grapes great again. Don't expect stuffy and pretentious joints that befuddle you with jargon, these casual bars welcome everyone from the wine novice to the connoisseurs looking for a 1982 Lafite. RECOMMENDED The best gin bars in Singapore and the best whisky bars in Singapore  

The best communal dining restaurants for big groups

The best communal dining restaurants for big groups

Eat together, stay together. It's always fun when people come together to eat, drink and be merry. From buffet tables to steaming hot dim sum, we show you how to over order and make the most out of those sharing platters. Pile on the food, we're ready for more.  RECOMMENDED: The best buffets in Singapore and the best Chinese restaurants in Singapore

Listings and reviews (71)

Zai Shun Curry Fish Head

Zai Shun Curry Fish Head

Don’t let its name fool you – Zai Shun has so much more to offer than fish head curry. While its eponymous dish is undoubtedly delicious, this seafood specialist is also famed for its range of steamed fish and sides served with a piping-hot bowl of porridge (or rice). To secure the freshest catch, make sure to head down early as popular items like the seasonal rabbit fish (pek tor her in Teochew) tend to sell out fast. There’s typically a range of fish to choose from: think red snapper, pomfret and even the luxurious Empurau if you fancy. Take your pick and let the kitchen know how you want it done – steamed Cantonese style with soy sauce or with fermented bean paste and lard. Prices vary depending on the weight and type of fish you choose. Other must-tries include the bittergourd fried with egg and salted egg yolk for that extra layer of decadence. You also won’t go wrong with any of their stewed vegetables like the chap chye or lily buds with mushrooms. But we would advise against ordering the meat dishes – you’re at a seafood joint, after all. The stewed pork belly, while flavourful, was tough in texture and isn’t something we’d pick again. Given the success of Zai Shun, it has taken over the entirety of the coffee shop, including the drink store. And on the menu there is a curious concoction of bittergourd and lime juice. The combination might give you the ick but the drink is actually downright refreshing and makes for the perfect pairing with Zai Shun’s dishes. As a lon

Lee's Confectionery

Lee's Confectionery

It’s not every day you find restaurant-quality desserts in the heart of an HDB estate but this gem in Jurong East does just that. This minimalist patisserie in Jurong East is run by chef-owner Lee Yin Quan, who has a diploma in French pastry from Ferrandi Paris, one of Europe’s most prestigious culinary institutes. Having worked with famous pastry chefs from around the world, Lee serves stunningly plated and meticulous desserts that you wouldn’t be surprised to find at a fine-dining establishment. There are two permanent items on the menu. Madu is a hexagonal cake of honey caramel with a cornflake crumble served with Horlicks ice cream, while Tart is a zesty lime tart encased in an almond shell that is sure to pucker your lips with just the right zing of acidity. Be sure to check Lee's Confectionery's Instagram page for updates on its rotating array of pastries. Enjoy your entremets with one of its locally sourced teas, coffees or specials including an oat milk iced chocolate and soy chai. With its delicate dessert, cosy minimalist interiors and affordable prices, it’s easy to see why people from across the island make the trek to Jurong for this sweet escape.

Sneaker Con Southeast Asia

Sneaker Con Southeast Asia

It's finally happening! Sneaker Con Southeast Asia will take place in Singapore on April 1 and 2. The event was first announced back in 2020 but had to be postponed due to obvious reasons. Calling itself The Greatest Sneaker Show on Earth, Sneaker Con SEA promises to bring the best of street culture to our shores. Since its inception in 2009, Sneaker Con has celebrated the love for rare designs, coveted drops, and grail-worthy releases by holding over 100 events in over 40 cities around the globe. No longer reserved for Hypebeasts, the sneaker subculture has seen a meteoric rise over the years, cementing its cool status among the young, the old and the mainstream. Here's what you can expect at Sneaker Con SEA when it takes over Singapore Expo Hall 5. Trading Pit Buy, sell or trade footwear, clothing and accessories with other streetwear aficionados. Shop with ease of mind as authenticity is guaranteed thanks to Sneaker Con's Legit Check authentication service. Panel discussions and guest appearances Jeff Staple, a respected figure in the global streetwear scene, headlines the event alongside local stalwarts celebrating 20 years of street culture in Singapore. Catch Mark Ong (aka Mr Sabotage) of SBTG fame and Mandeep Chopra, the founder of Limited Edt in action as they discuss the future of the local street scene. Exclusive merch For memory's sake, snap up merch designed by Indonesian streetwear brand, AGLXY. Also known as Ageless Galaxy, the brand's hallmark designs explore s

Papi's Tacos

Papi's Tacos

It’s been a while since we last dropped by this buzzy taqueria. Vibes-wise, the cosy 28-seater space still feels very much like an indoor food truck, with sizzle and chatter permeating the air. Food-wise, we’re happy to report that things have certainly improved. The pico de gallo ($6) is fresh and bright, while the esquites ($9) or grilled corn, comes packed with smoke and creaminess thanks to the addition of chipotle aioli. For mains, tacos (from $12 for two) still come in palm-sized servings, but the fillings pack heat and flavour. Pulled pork is decently tender, and we like the fish for its cleaner profile. Here, white dory is grilled, rather than deep-fried, to create a version that doesn’t taste too greasy and cloying. And save space for the sweet tres leche cake ($9), a creamy, homemade creation with evaporated milk, whole milk, and condensed milk. Drinks, of frozen (from $15) or shaken (from $16) margarita, are a must-order as well. – Original review by Nicole-Marie Ng on September 26 2018 ★★ This no-frills taqueria gets the vibe right. The tiny space is plastered with hand-painted vintage Spanish movie posters and you have to jostle and squeeze between yourneighbours at the open show kitchen decked out in green, white and red – the colours of the Mexican flag. There, chef Mauricio Espinoza, the big daddy of Papi’s Tacos, dishes up plates reminiscent of his hometown of Tlaxcala, a small state east of Mexico City. Because no Mexican restaurant is complete without guaca

Chilli Padi Nonya Restaurant

Chilli Padi Nonya Restaurant

There’s no denying you’ve stepped into a Peranakan Restaurant when you enter Chilli Padi. Red batik cloth drapes over the tables, a framed kebaya hangs on the wall and the restaurant is even located in a heritage shophouse from the pre-war era. Awards and media accolades line the walls beside colourful Peranakan art, enticing you to order more than you can manage, because you know you’ll be getting the legit stuff. Some of the tables come with a Lazy Susan, so no one will have to stretch to reach that claypot filled with ayam buah keluak. Whether it’s to entertain friends from out of town or an inter-generational gathering, Chilli Padi is definitely a top pick for a cosy gathering. It won’t be a proper Peranakan meal without ayam buah keluak (from $14.10) at the table. Chilli Padi’s rendition comes the closest to what you’ll find in the home of a Nyonya grandmother, with generous chunks of chicken and whole kernels of buah keluak that have been conveniently cut to fit the length of your fork. Another must-have is the cabbage roll ($5.50). Homemade otah is wrapped in Chinese cabbage and then steamed before it’s covered in a rich and spicy coconut curry.

Leckerbaer

Leckerbaer

Move aside macarons, Danish cookies are here to steal the show. Leckerbaer is a small pastry shop hailing from Ryesgade Street in Copenhagen specialising in småkager (smaw-kay-er). Its founders Jakob and Gabi Mogensen used to cook at Michelin-starred restaurants before setting their sights on turning the humble pastry on its head. Instead of the sugar-crusted butter cookies you find in those royal blue tins grandma keeps her sewing kit in, expect bakes loaded with premium ingredients and seasonal Nordic produce. You can expect a rotating menu of eight småkager ($2.80/each) at Leckerbaer's first international outpost in Singapore. Options range from those with a classic butter cookie base (the Milk, made with cacao and buttercream and the Lemon, a white chocolate cookie with a lemon curd centre) to those that are more like mini-cakes (the Banana dusted with berry sugar and filled with salted caramel). "Singapore has one of the most interesting and evolving culinary scenes in the world," says Jakob Mogensen, the founder of Leckerbaer. "The competition is tough and that motivates us to show the very best of what we can do and always be on top." Beyond its signature cookies, Leckerbaer also offers other sweet treats like its signature lemon and sea buckthorn tart (S$7), with torched Italian meringue and lemon and sea buckthorn curd as well as cakes like the Blondie ($7), a white chocolate base layered with passionfruit curd and white chocolate pearls. There are savoury options

Black Hair Salon

Black Hair Salon

Raymond Eng and Anthony Chu started Black Hair Salon in 2000 and have built a base of loyal customers who rely on them for the perfect hairstyle. They've recently moved from their small studio in Bencoolen to a larger space at Capitol Piazza, complete with pendant lights and a sleek, clean design. They oversee a small but tight ship of experienced hair stylists who have been at the salon for years. Most of their clients come for colouring services – but not just for your typical shades of brown. The salon specialises in vibrant dyes in hues of purple, pink, blue and green, and these colours actually stay on your hair for a month instead of fading away after a couple of washes. A basic cut starts from $40 for men and $48 for women, while creative colouring starts from $199 and includes bleaching. If you're concerned about the bleach drying out and damaging your hair, opt for an Olaplex pre-treatment ($40) or Olaplex full treatment ($120) to ensure that your hair is protected. Other treatments are also available, just ask your stylist for recommendations.

Lumo

Lumo

In darkness, comes light. Amidst the uncertainty Covid-19 has brought to Singapore's dining scene, Lumo – which means "light" in the constructed language of Esperanto – is a shining beacon of hope. It has everything it takes for a F&B business to survive in this day and age: a novel cocktail programme that runs the gamut of low ABV concoctions to those that will have you stumbling out the door, sharing plates of glistening meats straight from the wood-fire grill and a fun, convivial atmosphere peppered with American rock classics from the noughties. With social distancing measures in place, you can't have a seat by the bar, but you can still watch head bartender Josiah Chee whip up concoctions inspired by breakfast staples. Milk is reimagined in the Salt Honey Fizz ($20), a riff on the classic Ramos Gin Fizz made with vodka, caramelised honey, sea salt and a blend of seven different plant-based milks, which makes it more challenging to achieve the drink's signature froth. It still makes for a refreshing start before you move on to boozier creations like the Patty Royale ($20), take on a vesper martini that utilises Impossible distillate – yes they run the plant-based meat through a rotary evaporator – London dry gin and fermented tomato mushroom vermouth and shiso bitters for that added umami. If all that sounds a little too newfangled and experimental to you, then the good news is that the food menu is a lot more approachable – relying on age-old techniques like wood-fire gr

Bee’s Island Drinkery

Bee’s Island Drinkery

Millennial pink wallpaper stamped with leaves, ceiling planters, and tiki cocktails – all the right ingredients to create that island-paradise vibe. Bee’s Island Drinkery is a pop-up bar that acts as a colourful front for The Nomads, a sleek open-kitchen space dishing out Central Asian cuisine. The concepts work in tandem – with the restaurant providing bar snacks to the front and the bar shaking up drinks for the tasting menu at the back – and the idea is to have them feel completely different from each other.  Even within Bee’s Island Drinkery, the disparity is apparent. The food fares better than the cocktails, with generous portions of smoked-kissed leeks ($6), oyster mushrooms ($10) and charred Wagyu rib fingers ($15) dressed in all manner of deliciousness coming straight from the charcoal grill. But given too-low bar stools and narrow countertop that doesn’t shield from possible accidents – it’s hard to successfully navigate each morsel from plate to mouth without fear of drips or runaway nosh. The drinks are tropical, fruity and diluted. The Tropicana ($18), a combination of Monkey 47 dry gin, yellow watermelon juice and Midori melon liqueur is watered down from the first sip, as is the Beach Please ($18), a twist on a Pina Colada that comes in a massive urn filled to the brim with ice. The most flavourful cocktail comes in the form of the Pineapple Negroni ($18) mixed with pineapple- and coconut-infused rum, Campari and martini rosso –it starts off bitter but more swe

Ippoh Tempura

Ippoh Tempura

2 out of 5 stars

Last year saw plenty of tempura joints pop up around the island, each selling its own take on tendon. But at Ippoh Tempura Bar, the stakes are raised – each fried golden morsel is treated with absolute devotion. Or so I’m told. The price points confirm it: lunch starts at $60 and goes up to a whopping $100, while dinner’s an even more extravagant affair, priced between $120 and $200.  But is it worth it? Simply put, nope. And it’s largely the fault of the batter. Instead of being light and crisp, the batter forms an oily coat on the palate and is soggy at points – certainly not hitting the expectations raised by Ippoh’s claim of being Osaka’s oldest premium tempura restaurant, with culinary traditions dating back to 1850.  As with most high-end Japanese spots, the emphasis is on the quality of ingredients. Everything is imported from Japan, down to the limes used to squeeze over the seafood. The meal starts with two shrimp, one wrapped in shiso leaf and the other without, that are perfectly cooked, sweet and juicy. Similarly, the squid, kisu fish and anago are delicate and soft, like biting into crispy pillows of varying tastes and textures.  But the vegetables that follow are a disappointment. The sweet potato is powdery, the asparagus tasteless and the mushroom too oily. The biggest let-down, however, is the tempura seaweed with uni, caviar and wasabi – it had the texture of stale keropok. Even the decadent toppings fail to salvage the situation.  Time Out Singapore reviews

Live Twice

Live Twice

Saying goodbye is never easy. Late last year, the Jigger & Pony Group shut down Flagship in its three-concept shophouse to the dismay of Old Fashioned purists everywhere. And it’s twisting the knife in deeper by replacing it with a bar worlds apart from its grungy, divey past. Live Twice is a complete metamorphism of the space: the wall by the passageway has been knocked down, giving you a glimpse of the bar’s mid-century modern decor as you walk by. It beckons you in with an alluring amber glow and luxurious furniture – we’re talking $3000 Falcon armchairs – as well as an oddly shaped communal table right next to where the magic happens. At its head is Leow Yingying, a Diageo World Class winner who’s been with the group since 2017. The quietly confident bartender stirs up drinks that are fresh, polished and playfully experimental without all the bells and whistles. Garnishes are kept simple – if they appear at all – and the cocktails’ crystalline clarity is emphasised by elegant glassware. There are 14 drinks on the menu, with the first half inspired by classics you’d find in a Japanese craft cocktail bar. There you’ll find the Vesper ($25), a dangerously deceptive tipple befitting of its James Bond Casino Royale origins. Tempus Fugit Kina L'Aero D'Or (a fortified Cortese wine because the original Kina Lillet is no longer in production), Ki No Bi Sei Navy Strength Gin and Ketel One Vodka are shaken aggressively so that thing shards ice break off, adding texture to the lethal

Barbary Coast

Barbary Coast

5 out of 5 stars

A themed cocktail joint along Boat Quay is usually a recipe for disaster. But not when industry powerhouses Michael Callahan and Celia Schoonraad are at the helm – the former is the founding bartender and co-owner of 28 HongKong Street while the latter has done bartending stints across Europe, Australia and America. Needless to say, if anyone can make this two-storey space that spans three shophouses work, these two can. Barbary Coast is inspired by the San Francisco district of the same name back in the mid-1800s, where miners flocked in during the gold rush. This gave rise to two types of bars that capture the essence of the coast. On the first floor, there’s Deadfall, an accessible, no-nonsense spot with exposed brick walls and raw concrete floors; greasy pub grub ($12 to $15) including a plate of nachos with refillable cheese; and most importantly, $14 colour-coded cocktails, $12 glasses of wine and draft beer from $6. All sorts of people, pirates and pooches are welcomed here – and if you’re lucky, you might even spot Callahan’s puppy frolicking by the bar. Her name is Nugget and she's reason enough to visit. Take things to the next level and climb the steps to greater drinking heights at the Barbary Coast Ballroom. The second storey could not be more different from the first – with mismatched floral wallpaper, glittering chandeliers over plush velvet settees and even two private booths where you can push a button for a bottle of Billecart-Salmon champagne ($100). The co

News (169)

Open for business: Time Out launches campaign to celebrate independent businesses

Open for business: Time Out launches campaign to celebrate independent businesses

Hello Singapore,  Back in March, Time Out changed its name to Time In. We probably don’t need to go through all the reasons why, right? But now that Singapore’s done with the circuit breaker and life is slowly returning back to the city, we’re here to help you navigate the call-it-whatever-you-want “normal”. Don’t get us wrong. We’re not saying to throw caution to the wind – or your masks up in the air – and act like the past six months haven’t fundamentally changed us forever. And while it’s been great to see everyone come together to sing Home and celebrate our healthcare workers, more still needs to be done for those that need our help.  Since 1968, Time Out has always been on the mission to seek out the city’s best restaurants, cafés, bars, hawkers, shops, galleries, theatres, music venues, nightclubs – and all the other local independently run places where people come together. We share these places with you because we know without them, life in Singapore would be plain boring. But due to months of lost revenue and the steep cost of operating a business, many of these venues are at risk of closing forever if we don’t rally behind them. In fact, some already have.  The beauty of a small city like Singapore is that you don’t have to go very far to help. While most of us continue working from home, use this opportunity to look at your neighbourhood with fresh eyes through our handy guides. You might just discover a new favourite spot and save a business while you’re at it.

シンガポールで家庭菜園が流行している4の理由

シンガポールで家庭菜園が流行している4の理由

シンガポールは、道に並ぶ緑豊かな熱帯雨林の植物のおかげで、昔から「ガーデンシティ」として知られている。そのため、地元では「サーキットブレイカー」とも呼ばれた約2カ月のロックダウンの期間中、外の雰囲気を家にも持ち込みたいという欲求が多くの人のなかで高まってきたのは当然のことだろう。 今、シンガポールではさびたガーデニングツールを再び手に取り、家庭菜園で野菜や果物を育て始める人が急増している。高層アパートにある狭い家でも、その現象は見られる。どうやら彼らは、単に園芸スキルをアップさせたいと思って土いじりを始めたわけではなようだ。 自家栽培の農産物を販売する小規模ビジネス、WWEdiblesの創設者であるジョアンナ・チューア(写真上)は、みんなが家に閉じこもっていたロックダウンが、シンガポールで食べられる植物を育てる人が増えたきっかけになったと指摘。 「ロックダウンの間、特定の苗屋で買う必要のあるモンスタラスやアロカシアスのような観賞植物を、外へ出かけて求めることはできませんでした。その代わり、種から野菜などを育てる簡単な方法が注目されたわけです」と家庭菜園が増加した理由を説明した。 シンガポールの園芸家で、Insgtamアカウント(@briansgardenadventures)を通じて熱帯植物の情報を発信している、ブライアン・ティアンは、シンガポールでの植物栽培について「家庭での野菜栽培には多くの関心と熱意があるのを感じますが、適切な指導を受けられる機会はあまりありません。シンガポールでの園芸は簡単なことではありません。手をかけた植物が枯れてしまい、がっかりすることもあるでしょう」と現状を分析する。 シンガポールにおける園芸のトレンドとその背景にある根深い動機はなにか。二人のアーバンな土いじりの専門家に聞いた。   Brian ThianPhotograph: Kashmira Kasmuri     1. シンプルに、おいしい 誰にとっても、家庭菜園を始める第一の理由は単純なものだ。自分の手で育てたものを食べたいからだ。「私は食べることが大好きなので、自宅で収穫できるというアイデアは刺激的でした」と、ブライアンは家庭菜園を始めた頃の魅力をこう話す。 しかし土地が乏しいシンガポールでは、持てる生活空間の全てをフル活用しているため、新たに菜園環境を作るのは非常に困難だ。ジョアンナは植物を植えるために、自然光がたっぷり入る狭い屋上の庭も利用。ブライアンは自宅以外の場所でも菜園を始め、キャッサバやトウモロコシ、カシューナッツの木までもを団地の共有緑地に植えている。ブライアンは「自分と家族に何を食べさせているのかを正確に把握している」と、それでも苦労して菜園を続ける価値はあると教えてくれた。   Joanna's rooftop gardenPhotograph: Kashmira Kasmuri     2. 名シェフたちも地元食材に注目 シンガポールでは、家庭の食卓以外でも、受賞歴もあり国際的に認められたシェフやバーテンダーたちの店において、地元産の食材が使われてきた。 ミシュランの一つ星店であるラビリンスは、このムーブメントの草分け。メニューの90%近くに地元農家の食材を使っている。地元産へのこだわりは若手シェフの間にも。カウスモでは地元や地域の農家から仕入れているだけでなく、忘れ去られてしまった在来種の緑や花々にも注目しているという。 ジョアンナは、地元のシェフたちの意識についてこう語ってくれた。「シンガポールの一流シェフたちは、小さくて

In photos: life after lockdown in Singapore

In photos: life after lockdown in Singapore

It's been about a month since Singapore began Phase 2 of its reopening plans. We've seen the city slowly come back to life after the circuit breaker – with restaurant and bars opening their doors, galleries and museums welcoming visitors and cinemas dusting off their projectors. Heck, we've even had a national election. To date, Singapore has had more than 46,000 cases of Covid-19 and 27 deaths. These days, we're still seeing new cases being reported in the hundreds, including double-digit cases in the community outside of migrant worker dormitories. Yet, aside from the use of face masks and markings on the floor reminding us to practise social distancing, it seems like life has pretty much returned back to normal. However, the novel coronavirus remains an ever-present threat and we shouldn't get complacent. Cities like Hong Kong and Melbourne are in the middle of a second and even third wave, showing us that this is something we'll have to live with for the foreseeable future. So as we cautiously step out of homes and walk into the new normal, here's a look at what Singapore looks like post-circuit breaker. Jurong Point   Photograph: Kashmira Kasmuri   Jewel Changi Airport   Photograph: Kashmira Kasmuri   Tampines Mall   Photograph: Nicole-Marie Ng   Orchard Road   Photograph: Kashmira Kasmuri   Ang Mo Kio Hub    Photograph: Kashmira Kasmuri   IMM   Photograph: Kashmira Kasmuri   Suntec City    Photograph: Kashmira Kasmuri   313@Somerset     Photograph: Kash

Da Bao Diaries: DIY steak sets that are a breeze to prepare

Da Bao Diaries: DIY steak sets that are a breeze to prepare

Welcome to Da Bao Diaries, a column dedicated to what Time Out Singapore's editors are eating and drinking at home. Da bao is a Singaporean colloquialism derived from Mandarin that refers to having a meal to go instead of dining in at an establishment. Out of boredom or necessity, you've probably tried to grill a steak at least once during these past couple of months. It seems easy enough. Grab a $12 slab from the supermarket, generously rub it with salt and pepper and throw it on a hot pan till it turns dark brown crust. Simple. But I'm also willing to bet that your steak didn't come out perfect during your first try. With thin supermarket cuts, it's a challenge to work that Maillard magic without overcooking the beef. But don't feel defeated. Restaurants like BoCHINche are here to help and take the guesswork out of searing a perfect steak at home. Here's what you have to do. Choose between the ribeye ($58.90) or sirloin ($53) – you can graduate to the larger cuts like the 900g Wagyu shortloin ($223.70) once you gain some confidence – and throw it on a hot pan with some olive oil. Each 300g slice of grass-fed Argentinian beef comes pre-marinated in oil and a couple of sprigs of thyme. Follow the instructions on how long to sear each side in order to achieve your desired doneness.   BoCHINchePhotograph: Nicole-Marie Ng   If this isn't your first rodeo, then freestyle and add in a tablespoon of butter, a couple of cloves of crushed garlic and whatever else you desire a minut

Grammi: Italian comfort food from an online restaurant

Grammi: Italian comfort food from an online restaurant

There's been plenty of speculation about what the future of dining in Singapore will look like. And with more restaurants shuttering during this period than ever before, maybe a little reinvention is what it takes to succeed. Mavericks like chef Beppe De Vito are reimagining what a restaurant has to be in this brave new world. But to break the rules, you have to first master them – and Beppe is no stranger to the highs and lows of running a food and beverage (F&B) business. He founded ilLido in 2006 and operates award-winning restaurants like Michelin-starred Braci and modern pizzeria Amò. He's also been a strong proponent of the #savefnbsg movement, banding chefs and restaurateurs together to help the industry as a whole.   Beppe De VitoPhotograph: Grammi   Fuelled by experience and his love for Italian food, his latest venture is an experiment – a restaurant that exists solely on the internet. Grammi's colourful site splashed in orange and blue replaces the typical shopfront. The dining room knows no physical boundaries with island-wide delivery or self-collection from National Gallery Singapore. And the concept is broken down into three sections – restaurant, grocery and drinks – so you can choose where you want to linger about. The restaurant offers an extensive range of wholesome Italian dishes. There's the burrata salad ($18), which comes packed with pumpkin, wild rucola and a generous dollop of truffle pesto. Pasta options such as a tray of baked caserecce ($16.90) w

Da Bao Diaries: vegetable-forward dishes from SPRMRKT that hit the spot

Da Bao Diaries: vegetable-forward dishes from SPRMRKT that hit the spot

Welcome to Da Bao Diaries, a column dedicated to what Time Out Singapore's editors are eating and drinking at home till we can visit our city's restaurants and bars once more. Da bao is a Singaporean colloquialism derived from Mandarin that refers to having a meal to go instead of dining in at an establishment. When the circuit breaker started, I – like many of you – had lofty goals to exercise more and eat better. Unfortunately, "I'm going to run every day" and "I'm going to eat more greens for dinner", got quickly replaced by "I'm too tired to step out of the house" and "I'm just going to grab chicken rice from the coffeeshop". And after 56 days, I'm left wondering where all that time that could have been channelled to more productive pursuits went. While I did manage to incorporate some running into my routine, taking control of my diet more challenging. I was constantly tempted to order in fried food, desserts and bottled cocktails – which are all great in moderation – but not so much when you're trying to shed a couple of kilos. Enter SPRMRKT's new vegetable-forward menu that actually makes healthy eating a joy. I would choose its hearty dishes like the cauliflower rice ($24) with halloumi over regular fried rice any day. The florets are finely chopped and have the texture of cous cous but it's the extra virgin olive oil and capers sauce that makes this dish sing. The same sauce makes an appearance as an accompaniment to the hamachi collar ($32). The generous hunk of fis

A double rainbow arches over Singapore on the last day of 'circuit breaker'

A double rainbow arches over Singapore on the last day of 'circuit breaker'

After 56 long days, Singapore emerges (cautiously) from our 'circuit breaker' period. It's been a challenging time for everyone, with the ever-present threat of Covid-19 and its ramifications hanging in the air. Not to mention the heartbreaking news coming out Minneapolis at the moment, the impact of which can be felt around the world. But on the evening of June 1, there was a reason to take pause, smile and feel like everything's going to get better. After a wet and dreary afternoon, a spectacular rainbow emerged during the sunset as if to mark the end of these trying times. Set against cotton candy-pink and purple sky, the faint double rainbow is also a fitting way to welcome the start of Pride Month. Here are some gorgeous photos of the double rainbow arched over Singapore.   Bedok Photograph: @osmanthus_tea/Instagram       Tampines Photograph: @zeehannie/Instagram       Simei Photograph: @nicolemarieng/Instagram   And for those of us who didn't get to catch the rainbow, this brilliant golden sunset also provided a brief moment of peace.   Tiong Bahru Photograph: Dewi Nurjuwita         Jurong Photograph: Kashmira Kasmuri   Have photos of this evening's rainbow you want to share with us? Tag us @timeoutsg on Instagram. Want more feel-good stories? Watch the African penguins roam around the Singapore Zoo or the orangutans play with bubbles Here are things you can do to help your community right now And the local charities that need your support

You can now buy groceries from the people that supply Singapore's best restaurants

You can now buy groceries from the people that supply Singapore's best restaurants

It's been said numerous times: good cooking starts with quality ingredients. So if you're spending more time than ever in the kitchen, give your homecooked dinners an upgrade with gourmet groceries from the newly launched Classic Deli. The artisanal produce supplier, Classic Fine Foods, is giving us (yes, us regular people!) a chance to get fancy in the kitchen with ingredients that were previously only available to top chefs in the city. The online grocery store stocks a wide range of restaurant-quality products from Wagyu (from $33.92) and pasture-fed lamb from New Zealand (from $22.90) to cod loins (from $78.90 for 2kg) and frozen Spanish carabineros (from $87.90 for 1kg). Stock your pantry with staples like pasta from Abruzzo (from $5.50), premium extra virgin olive oil from Italy and Spain (from $15) as well as a range of balsamic vinegars (from $8). The best part is that these ingredients aren't as expensive as you'd think – prices are kept competitive with what you'd find at your neighbourhood supermarket. It sweetens the deal further by offering first-time customers 10 percent off their order with the code 10DELI. Those that spend more than $150 can also enjoy free islandwide delivery. It also provides an alternative for those who need their groceries pronto but can't score a delivery slot through the major online players. Make an order before 4.30pm and your items will be delivered the next day (except Sundays). Read on for the best grocery stores in Singapore Where

Da Bao Diaries: can steak survive the delivery drive?

Da Bao Diaries: can steak survive the delivery drive?

Welcome to Da Bao Diaries, a daily column dedicated to what Time Out Singapore's editors are eating and drinking while Singapore's 'circuit breaker' measures are in place till June 1. Da bao is a Singaporean colloquialism derived from Mandarin that refers to having a meal to go instead of dining in at an establishment. We've all been there. You order a steak at a medium-rare steak at a restaurant... and it comes out well done. Sometimes it's excusable if you're paying less than $20 for a steak at a neighbourhood joint but when you get to steakhouse prices – we're talking at least $100 – it had better come out perfect. The stakes are even higher now that we can't dine in. If the steak that arrives via delivery isn't at your desired doneness, it's not like you can call the rider up and ask him to take it back to the kitchen. It'll be hours before you finally get to have your dinner. Plus with how much restaurants are struggling right now, do you really want to be that person? So here's the solution if you're hankering for a slab of beef. One: cook it yourself so you only have yourself to blame (or praise). Or two: try Wolfgang's Steakhouse Singapore's Taste of New York set. You get a generous bone-in USDA Prime Black Angus Dry Aged New York Sirloin Steak, creamed spinach, mashed potatoes and a small slice of New York cheesecake for just $58. It's a value-for-money deal that gives you a taste of what the restaurant has to offer – and if you like it, you can then order its prime

Da Bao Diaries: throw a virtual punchbowl party complete with beef katsu sandos

Da Bao Diaries: throw a virtual punchbowl party complete with beef katsu sandos

Welcome to Da Bao Diaries, a daily column dedicated to what Time Out Singapore's editors are eating and drinking while Singapore's 'circuit breaker' measures are in place till June 1. Da bao is a Singaporean colloquialism derived from Mandarin that refers to having a meal to go instead of dining in at an establishment. I was looking through my Instagram Story archive the other day and it got me reminiscing about what I was doing this time last year. The Singapore Cocktail Festival was in full swing – I was drinking too much at the festival village, attending guest shifts by international legends at bars around the city and of course, celebrating our local wins during the Asia's 50 Best Bars ceremony. Needless to say, none of that can happen this year. The Singapore Cocktail Festival still lives on digitally this month, the flagship village has been moved to October, and the Asia's 50 Best Bars announcement is happening tonight via Facebook Live. But that doesn't mean we can't drink and make merry at home. Jigger & Pony's punch bowl parties are one way to keep the celebratory spirit alive. There are two punch bowls to choose from – King Ferdinand ($200), a mix of gin, rum, chamomile, passionfruit and honey or the Pendennis Punch ($200), which features whiskey, gin, jasmine tea, apricot and Peychaud's bitters. Each can be split with up to four people, which is what I chose to do. My pouch came with about 350ml of King Ferdinand (yes, I measured) and lasted me through an hour-lo

Here's how you can make the iconic Singapore Sling from the Raffles Long Bar at home

Here's how you can make the iconic Singapore Sling from the Raffles Long Bar at home

Up your cocktail game at home by recreating the legendary Singapore Sling at home. The iconic tipple was first created in Raffles Long Bar by Ngiam Tong Boon in 1915. During this time, women could not defy social convention and drink alcoholic beverages in public. Thus, he concocted this innocent-looking pink beverage that still packed a boozy punch for the bar's female guests. They were, of course, delighted – and the rest, as they say, is history. The recipe for the iconic Singapore Sling has remained unchanged throughout the years and the sweet, tropical drink has won fans from across the world. Here's how you can shake it up at home: Ingredients 30 ml Gin15 ml Cherry brandy120 ml Pineapple juice15 ml Lime juice7.5 ml Cointreau7.5 ml Dom Benedictine10 ml GrenadineA dash of angostura bittersA slice of pineapple and a cherry Method Pour all the ingredients into a cocktail shaker Add ice and shake Strain into an ice-filled tall glass Garnish with pineapple and cherry Complete the experience by grabbing a bag of peanuts to snack on as you sip on your creation. And if you don't mind cleaning up after, scatter your peanut shells on the floor like you would at the Long Bar. Want more cocktail recipes from local bartenders? Try the Maharaja from IB HQ, a refreshing Matcha Tonic by the award-winning Native or the low-ABV Sage 43 by Platform

Da bao diaries: wood-fired pizzas and a killer roast chicken

Da bao diaries: wood-fired pizzas and a killer roast chicken

Welcome to Da Bao Diaries, a column dedicated to what Time Out Singapore's editors are eating and drinking while Singapore's 'circuit breaker' measures are in place till May 4. Da bao is a Singaporean colloquialism derived from Mandarin that refers to having a meal to go instead of dining in at an establishment. If you've been a long-time reader of Time Out Singapore, you might recall that our office was once located along the bustling HongKong Street. On days when the team didn't have time to step out of the office, we would order a pizza or two from Amò, sharing it for lunch while rushing to complete the print magazine before the final deadline. It was a bright spark during an otherwise stressful period. These days, I find myself needing more and more bright sparks. And thankfully, Amò delivers. Plus it sweetens the deal even further, offering a 25 percent discount on delivery with the code "DELIVER25" and 30 percent off pick-ups with the code "PICKUP30". Just note that this only applies to à la carte orders and not the pizza and wine bundles that are already sold at a discounted rate. You'll want to order à la carte anyway because you should not miss the butter roasted spring chicken ($37.45), an unexpected find drizzled in rosemary jus and served with Roman potatoes and baby spinach. The succulent meat stood up well to the reheating process, its flavourful skin getting just slightly crisp in the oven. But of course, the real stars are the pizzas. I reunite with my favouri

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