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Winnie Stubbs

Winnie Stubbs

Lifestyle Writer

Winnie Stubbs is an English-born writer who fell in love with Sydney when she first visited at the age of four. Back then, it was playgrounds and rainbow-flavoured Paddle Pops that piqued her interest, but her tastes have since evolved. Now, you’re likely to find her at the back of a yoga class or two Martinis deep at one of Sydney’s best vermouth-slinging bars.

After working in travel media in London and Sri Lanka, Winnie moved to Sydney to study in 2018. While studying, she began freelance writing for Broadsheet, and took on a role as editor of a sustainable lifestyle website in 2020. Her fascination with beautiful spaces led to a focus on eco luxe hotels, and she has since gone on to contribute lifestyle and travel stories to publications including Gourmet Traveller, Lux Nomade, We Are Explorers and Pandaemonium.

In her role as Lifestyle Writer at Time Out Sydney, Winnie covers almost anything that’s going on around the city and beyond. Drop her an email via winnie.stubbs@timeout.com

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Articles (56)

Your ultimate guide to Byron Bay

Your ultimate guide to Byron Bay

Call it what you will – the rainbow region, the Northern Rivers, the hinterland – the Bundjalung Nation (the region around Byron Bay) holds a certain ineffable magic. I was once told – en route to a very-Byron tea ceremony on a rainy Wednesday evening – that the magic comes from the earth; that the ground beneath the hills, spiked with crystals from a nearby volcano, generates a uniquely healing energy. And though my limited geological understanding prevents me from verifying that fact, I’m confident that there’s something special about this stretch of sparkling coastline and rolling hills that the Arakwal, Minjungbal and Widjabul Wia-bal people call home. Byron Bay – undeniably the region’s most well-known town – has traditionally acted as a place for people to come together, known by the Arakwal people as 'Cavanbah' which translates to mean 'meeting place’. And while the gentrified hippie beach town on Australia’s easternmost point does have its perks – a stunning coastal walk that curls up over a beach-studded stretch of sparkling ocean, high-end hotels that blend sophisticated design with beachside nonchalance, and a restaurant scene to rival any Sydney suburb – we’re of the opinion that the true gems of the region lie outside of town. Whether you’re looking to follow in the footsteps of the the hemp-clad, Byron-dwelling hippie of yesteryear, get lost in the waterfalls that wind through the hinterland, or glide from the blindingly bright shores of Wategos to a marble-trim

The best hotels in Sydney

The best hotels in Sydney

The Emerald City is peppered with a whole host of stellar hotels that each individually carry their own little sparkly slice of je ne sais quoi. Whether you’re in town for one night, want a longer stay, are flitting through for business, or are travelling to Sydney for the very first time and want to make sure you’re in the best possible spot to properly explore the city, we have you covered. Having earned our stripes reviewing hotels across the country, our team of writers (including Lifestyle Writer Winnie Stubbs and our Travel and News Editor Melissa Woodley) have shared their top picks – along with top tips on how to make the most of your stay. From five-star luxury to boutique boltholes, this list is our edit of the best hotels in Sydney (in no particular order). Warning: it'll be hard for you to choose just one to stay at! Sorry, not sorry. Rather stay under canvas? Find the best glamping sites in NSW or the best camping near Sydney. This article includes affiliate links. These links have no influence on our editorial content. For more information, click here.

Things to do in Sydney this week

Things to do in Sydney this week

Taylor might have left town (more on that here), but girl power isn’t going anywhere – with events popping up across Sydney this week in celebration of International Women’s Day (Friday, March 8), and an incredible line-up of female-led theatre (including & Juliet: a female-forward take on the world’s most famous love story). If you’re looking for a special spot for dinner this week, we’d suggest checking out The Bentley Group’s latest venture; King Clarence. If you’re on a budget, check out our list of Sydney’s best cheap eats – more funds to play with at the best bars in the city. Want more this week? How about starting the day at one of our city's best outdoor swimming pools, then booking in for dinner at one of the best restaurants in Sydney right now. 

Things to do for International Women's Day in Sydney

Things to do for International Women's Day in Sydney

International Women's Day takes place this year on Friday, March 8, and the 2024 theme is Inspire Inclusion – it's all about celebrating women's achievements, raising awareness about discrimination, and taking action to drive gender parity, as we move towards a gender-equal world free of bias, stereotypes and discrimination.  The annual day of solidarity and activism has become a rallying point for people around the world to unite, celebrate and brainstorm solutions to the ever-mutating challenges we face. Feminism takes many forms, and each female-identifying person should feel like they can celebrate IWD in a way that truly explores their experience. To that end, we’ve selected a range of different ways to experience International Women's Day in Sydney this year. Psst... Have you heard about All About Women? It's the Sydney Opera House's annual feminist fest, with this year's line-up including a conversation with Mary Beard and a candle-making workshop with Nonna's Grocer.

Your ultimate guide to Shoalhaven

Your ultimate guide to Shoalhaven

There’s a certain bucolic scene that sparks a primal sense of calm: an evolutionary sedative  to the cells. When we’re presented with a scene that features high ground, water, trees and grazing animals, we automatically feel calmer: safe in the knowledge that all of our basic needs (for shelter, food and water) can be met. It’s that scene that presents itself at almost every corner in the Shoalhaven region. And here, our other, more indulgent baseline needs (for a good flat white, loaf of sourdough and Negroni) can be met too. It’s the kind of place where time slows down along with your heart rate. Where you step back in time to a world where everyone takes the time to learn your name – but where the joys of modern life are never too difficult to come by. It’s a place you’ll want to return to again and again. The traditional land of the Bhwerawerri, Budawang, Jerrinja, Murramarang, Tomikin, Wandi wandandian, Wodi wodi, Yuin and associated clans, this stretch of rolling hills and stunning coastline a few hours south of Sydney has been something of a hidden holiday gem for decades: the site of repeat visits for those lucky enough to discover it, but overlooked by many in favour of the state’s more well-known beach towns (Byron Bay, we’re looking at you). Now though, it’s undeniably on the up – with roadside motels morphing into high-end stays, and low-key pubs becoming hatted restaurants. But despite the region's ballooning offering, it still feels utterly, divinely unspoiled. 

47 things to do in Sydney this weekend

47 things to do in Sydney this weekend

For a healthy dose of art, music and excellent booze this weekend, we’d suggest getting over to Stickybeak Festival – it’s taking over the National Art School (NAS) for two days, and this year’s lineup looks better than ever. If you’re keen to get out of town, we’d recommend checking out one of the best day hikes from Sydney, or make a weekend of it at one of the best weekend getaways in NSW. Want to get your nature fix closer to home? These are Sydney’s best walks, and these are the best spots to kick back afterwards with a schooner in the sun.   Want a quiet spot to swim? Check out Sydney's best secret swimming spots.

Where to party in Sydney this Mardi Gras

Where to party in Sydney this Mardi Gras

Sydney’s sparkliest night of nights is back. The 46th annual Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade is on Saturday, March 2, taking over Oxford Street in all its rainbow glory. You don’t even need to be at the actual parade to get amongst the Mardi magic – or kicking on at the official Mardi Gras Party with Adam Lambert. The rainbow will be shining all over Sydney, and there are plenty of venues throwing parties where you can have a colourful time all day, watch the ABC’s live parade coverage on a big screen in the evening, and boogie on down into the wee hours with DJs, drag stars and queer performers. Ready to celebrate LGBTQIA+ pride? Here's where the best parties are coming out.   Start your engines: Drag icon Hannah Conda spills the tea with us

March events in Sydney

March events in Sydney

March is upon us – and to go against the mainstream, we reckon that it's the best month of the year in Sydney. March in the Emerald City is full of warm days, crazy clear water, less crowds and all-round delicious autumnal times. During these weeks of balance, Sydneysiders will get the chance to hit up the inaugural All About Women festival for an extravaganza of feminist ideas, powerful women and groundbreaking talks, a staggering number of West End hits, and some major blockbuster art exhibitions (largely thanks to the Sydney International Art Series). Plus, despite summer being over *by name*, there's still going to be plenty of time to frolic through the city's best beaches, splash around at one of Sydney's most beautiful swimming spots, and head off the beaten track at one of the city's most stunning secret beaches. The heat is still on, and as such, so are we. Stay outside this March at one of Sydney's best (and easiest) day hikes, and then think about heading to one of the most gorgeous glamping sites in town.   

The best walks in Sydney

The best walks in Sydney

From easy breezy coastal walks to half-day bush hikes and multi-day expeditions, Sydney is blessed with many different walking paths that’ll suit amblers of all abilities.As fans of anything that allows us a different vantage point of our city (rooftop bars included), our editors have rounded up their favourites. Take a look at our list of 13 walks in Sydney that’ll take you over dramatic sandstone cliffs, cobbled stone paths, sandy inlets and well-trodden boardwalks. Take your camera to capture city skyline views, kookaburras sitting in old gum trees, Australian water dragons basking in the sunlight and preserved and protected Aboriginal engravings dating back thousands of years. Photograph: Supplied | Destination NSW Feel like cooling off? We've ranked the best beaches in Sydney.

The 52 best things to do in Sydney in 2024

The 52 best things to do in Sydney in 2024

We might be a little biased, but in our humble opinion, Sydney's got it all. Can you think of many other cities in the world that rival its natural beauty, rich heritage and history that dates back thousands of years, and its creative, culinary and cultural offerings by world-class pros. In fact, there's so much to see, do, sip and ponder here, you could be forgiven for feeling a little overwhelmed. Worry not, dear reader – we're making it simple for you. Our team (including Food & Drink Editor Avril Treasure and our Sydney Editor Alice Ellis) sifted through every good time the Big Smoke has to offer and put together a Sydney bucket list for the ages. Whether you're a new arrival or a born-and-bred local, this 2024 Time Out Sydney round-up of the city's must-do activities will let you experience Sydney from every angle. After all those great activities you're bound to be thirsty. We suggest you head to one of the best pubs in Sydney right now.  Need somewhere to stay? Check out Sydney's best Airbnbs, or Sydney's best hotels.

The 18 best art galleries to explore in Australia

The 18 best art galleries to explore in Australia

Australians have a love affair with art, and with incredible galleries dotted throughout the country, it’s also one of the top reasons we travel interstate. Every year, our nation welcomes blockbuster international exhibitions, along with major showings of our most colourful and creative local talents.  Whether it’s contemporary Aboriginal art in Alice Springs, delicate glassworks in Wagga Wagga, topical portraits in Canberra or 21st-century Chinese art in Sydney, these are the best public galleries worth visiting in Australia.  RECOMMENDED: These are the 20 top tourist attractions in Australia.

11 of the best health and wellness retreats in Australia

11 of the best health and wellness retreats in Australia

Sometimes you just need to take a time out – and here at Time Out Australia, we’re the experts at doing just that. We’ve scoped out the very best wellness retreats around Australia where you can soak away your worries and be pampered like absolute royalty. From an award-winning natural hot spring with 50 bathing experiences to the Southern Hemisphere’s largest spa with one of only two Somadome meditation pods in Australia, these places will cater to all your relaxing desires. Make a day trip of it or sneak off for a dedicated week-long detox – whatever you choose, you’ll leave feeling like a whole new person.  RECOMMENDED: Live the luxe life with a stay at one of the top luxury hotels in Australia.

Listings and reviews (62)

Lost Sundays Block Party

Lost Sundays Block Party

Lost Sundays has been a reliably strong party in the Sydney/ Eora scene for a while now – with the good people from Lost Paradise curating high-energy line-ups, and Merivale doing the rest. The rest, in this case, refers to providing a spectacular party setting in the form of Ivy; complete with next-level lighting and sound, a rooftop pool bar and, naturally, a strong selection of alcoholic refreshments. This month, Lost Sundays is launching its first “block party” extended edition: taking over the whole Ivy Precinct for a festival style one day pop-up.  The line-up will be spread across four stages throughout the precinct, featuring more than two dozen local and international artists, plus the kind of high-spec production value you’d expect from the shiny CBD precinct. Headliners come in the form of CC:DISCO!, DJ Boring, Special Request, KiNK and Job Jobse. On the food front, you can score Merivale hard-hitters from different venues across the precinct. Head to the Pool Club for Vinnie’s pizza, or down to Ash St. Cellar for cheeseburger spring rolls, herb crusted chicken, fries, and more.Tickets for early entry (before 5pm) start at $92.52, and you can snap them up over here.   RECOMMENDED: Want fun now? Here’s what’s on in Sydney this weekend These are the best events in Sydney this month These are the best bars in Sydney right now

Pebbly Beach Escape

Pebbly Beach Escape

There will come a moment, an hour or so into your stay at Pebbly Beach Escape, that you’ll begin planning how and when you can return. It might come when you’re in the ocean; diving beneath diamond-like waves, looking back at the bowl of the valley that holds the grounds in a quiet, almost motionless haze, or when you’re sitting on the deck with a glass of wine, watching kangaroos graze lazily on the lawns. It’s safe to assume that this was the same thought that occurred to Ursula Schwallbach, who founded the retreat back in the 1940s.  We were told Ursulas’s story by Colin Ballie, the manager of Pebbly Beach Escape whose love for the site and its story shines through immediately. She’d stumbled upon what was then the site of an abandoned timber yard, and fell in love at once – securing a one hundred year lease on the land the moment she returned to Sydney. Ursula and her entourage built the first cabin on the grounds back in 1946, and set up tents throughout the grounds. What they offered was akin to what we now know as glamping: hosting guests in canvas tents and feeding them with fresh fish cooked over open flames. “They set up tents to see if people from Sydney would come, and they did,” Colin explains.  And – almost eighty years on – they still do. We arrived on Friday afternoon, and were greeted by Colin and the current owner of Pebbly Beach, who may just be the most bright-eyed, joyful man I have ever met. Adam bought the property in 2018, refurbishing the five heritag

China Heights

China Heights

Housed in a cavernous, warehouse-like space a few floors above Foster Street, this artist-run initiative was founded in 2004 by Edward Woodley, Michael Sharp and Mark Drew – three friends who straddled the divide between fine art and design/creative work. The roster of shows at Heights reflects this, with an emphasis on creative slashies, street art, graphic design and emerging young artists. Walk past on a Friday evening and you'll likely see throngs of terrifyingly trendy art students spilling onto the street – a sign that it's worth stepping inside to explore a newly launched exhibition. RECOMMENDED:  These are the best art galleries in SydneyAnd these are our favourite bars in Surry Hills  

Robertson Potato Festival

Robertson Potato Festival

Carb lovers, mark your calendars. The Robertson Potato Festival is coming back to the Southern Highlands for two days of potato-fuelled fun. Popping up at Robertson Showground in the idyllic Southern Highlands (under two hours drive from Sydney), the event will run from 10am until 4pm on Saturday, May 4 and Sunday, May 5 – with a line-up of potato-centric activities and food stalls that make the versatile vegetable sing. The festival is held in Robertson to celebrate the town’s impressive potato harvest – with one particular Robertson-based potato farm (Hill Family Farm) responsible for producing six different varieties of spuds. As an ode to the potato, activities at the festival will include competitive potato peeling, a spud and spoon race, and sack races. Visitors can also expect live music, cooking demonstrations, potato product stall holders and (naturally) a whole heap of tasty, starchy food. Early bird tickets start from $25, and you can snap them up over here. RECOMMENDED:This garden party-style festival is coming to the Southern Highlands in March These are the best hot chips in Sydney, as voted by youWant to stock up on fresh spuds in Sydney? These are the best markets in the city

Sit Stay Society Rescue Dog Pop-Up Wine Bar

Sit Stay Society Rescue Dog Pop-Up Wine Bar

  Looking for a side of oxytocin with your glass of Orvieto? We’ve got you. Sit Stay Society’s pop-up wine bar with in-residence rescue dogs is coming back to Sydney for two days only – taking over Stanley’s on Stanley for a weekend of wine-fuelled fundraising for dogs in need. To clarify: that’s a wine bar with rescue dogs. Pet nat and pooches. Cab sav and cuddles. And if you really fall in love, one dog in attendance might become your next family member. From March 16-17, Sit Stay Society Wines will transform Stanley Street’s Stanley’s on Stanley into a wine bar for guests to enjoy a glass of good wine and a cuddle with a doggo in need of a loving home. That means you can throw back a Big Dog sauvignon blanc, Big Dog chardonnay and Big Dog pinot grigio while getting all the pats you and the good boys and girls need. A $55 ticket will score you three glasses of Sit Stay Society wine, a charcuterie box, and 80 minutes of cuddles (plus a disocunt to use on Sit Stay Society wines in-store). The Sit Stay Society wine range is a collection of South Australian drops with a worthy cause. For every 750ml or 375ml bottle sold, Sit Stay Society donates a portion to support PetRescue’s mission to ensure every pet is safe, respected and loved. If that ain't a good enough reason to get a wine buzz while patting a pooch, we don't know what is. The event will run multiple sessions across three days, and is only for guests aged 18 above. To ensure the safety and comfort of the pooches pres

Aespa

Aespa

It’s a good week to be a female pop star in Sydney. Not only is Taylor Swift taking over the city with shows, activations and a general wave of Swift-mania, but the South Korean-born K Pop sensation Aespa has just announced dates for their Aussie tour. The quartet’s SYNK: Parallel Line world tour is currently set to comprise 19 concerts across 13 cities in Australia and Asia, and they’ll be bringing their hyperpop magic to Sydney on the last day of August 2024. When is Aespa in Sydney? Winter, Karina, Ningning and Giselle will be taking to the stage in Sydney on Saturday, August 31. The exact venue is yet to be announced. How can I get tickets to the Sydney Aespa show and how much do they cost? The release date for tickets is yet to be confirmed, but you can sign up to the waitlist via Ticketek to make sure you’re the first to know. What will Aespa’s Sydney show be like? Details are thin on the ground, but their agency has stated that the show will “take place in the parallel universe story that Aespa has as its musical backdrop.” Based on their last world tour, it’s likely that they’ll change the setlist up a little for each show, and we’re expecting the kind of surreal high-energy hyperpop that they’re known for. Who will the Sydney Aespa support acts be? The support acts for Aespa’s SYNK: Parallel Line tour is yet to be released, but we expect the K Pop theme to remain strong. More details on the tour will be released via their Weverse page – so we’d recommend keeping an e

Aespa

Aespa

It’s a good week to be a pop music fan in Melbourne. Not only has Taylor Swift just taken the city by storm with shows, activations and a general wave of Swift-mania, but the South Korean-born K Pop sensation Aespa has just announced dates for their Aussie tour. The quartet’s SYNK: Parallel Line world tour is currently set to comprise 19 concerts across 13 cities in Australia and Asia, and they’ll be bringing their hyperpop magic to Melbourne in early September 2024. When is Aespa in Melbourne? Winter, Karina, Ningning and Giselle will be taking to the stage in Melbourne on Monday, September 2. The exact venue is yet to be announced. How can I get tickets to the Melbourne Aespa show and how much do they cost? The release date for tickets is yet to be confirmed, but you can sign up to the waitlist via Ticketek to make sure you’re the first to know. What will Aespa’s Melbourne show be like? Details are thin on the ground, but their agency has stated that the show will “take place in the parallel universe story that Aespa has as its musical backdrop”. Based on their last world tour, it’s likely that they’ll change the setlist up a little for each show, and we’re expecting the kind of surreal high-energy hyperpop that they’re known for. Who will the Melbourne Aespa support acts be? The support acts for Aespa’s SYNK: Parallel Line tour are yet to be released, but we expect the K Pop theme to remain strong. More details on the tour will be released via their Weverse page – so we’d

Greek Festival of Sydney

Greek Festival of Sydney

Gyros fans, rejoice! This weekend, the Greek Festival of Sydney is returning for its 20th year – taking over Darling Harbour’s Tumbalong Park with traditional and contemporary Greek offerings to transport you straight to Santorini. Running from 11am until 10pm on Saturday, February 24 and Sunday, February 25, the Greek Festival of Sydney 2024 will play host to food stalls slinging all of your Greek foodie favourites: from fluffy loukoumades to frosty beer. Visitors can also expect musical performances, pop-up stalls selling traditional Greek crafts and keepsakes, and live dances from Canberra Hellenic dancers. Younger visitors can be kept entertained with craft workshops and face painting while foodie fiends hunt down the best souvlaki on the block. Opa! You can learn more about the Greek Festival of Sydney and plan your visit over here. RECOMMENDED: Inspired to head to a Greek island? International flights from Sydney are getting cheaper Don’t have the funds? Recreate a European summer experience at these spots in SydneyNeed more markets? These are Sydney’s best

Palestinian Film Festival

Palestinian Film Festival

“There’s never been a more important time to learn the stories of Palestine," says Naser Shakhtour, Director of Australia's Palestinian Film Festival. And now the Palestinian Film Festival Australia is back, with a program of films from Palestinian filmmakers and storytellers showing across the country, including at Cinema Nova.  Now in its 12th year, the Palestinian Film Festival Australia will be on in Melbourne from March 14-17. The festival will also have stints in Sydney, Canberra, Brisbane, Hobart and Perth during March. The Melbourne event will play host to 12 films, including award-winning features and ground-breaking documentaries. “The last few months in Gaza and in the West Bank have been, and continue to be, beyond devastating. People everywhere are asking brave questions and actively seeking independent and alternative perspectives,” says Shakhtour. “Our twelfth festival program pays tribute to the continued resistance and resilience of the Palestinian people.” This year’s festival will open with a coming-of-age, socio-political drama Alam, which tells the story of a Palestinian teen who undergoes a political awakening, sparked by an outspoken new girl at his school. The sci-fi documentary Lyd will make its Australian premiere in Sydney before also showing in Melbourne, and other acclaimed films on the program include A Gaza Weekend (winner of the International Federation of Film Critics Prize at the 2022 Toronto International Film Festival) and Bye Bye Tiberias 

Josh Thomas: Let's Tidy Up

Josh Thomas: Let's Tidy Up

4 out of 5 stars

Forty-five minutes into Josh Thomas’s solo show at Sydney Opera House, he grabs a broom and breaks into a languidly executed and bizarrely brilliant dance routine that belies the unlikely sex symbol that he is to many Australian millennials. As a British import, the intricacies of many of Australia’s pop culture personas remain a mystery to me. I’d been unaware of this side to the comedian (whose existence I’d learnt of only days prior), and it made a fun addition to the cocktail of traits that form his on-stage persona: erratic but engaging, wicked-smart but infinitely endearing. For someone who has (staggeringly) managed to make it to 2024 without encountering the cultural phenomenon that is Josh Thomas (or the television shows he has written, produced and starred in: Please Like Me and Everything’s Gonna Be Ok) I’m quickly acquainted with the cornerstones of his identity. Early into the show, he recounts his diagnoses with both ADHD and autism – describing how the former brought him face to face with the ghosts of what he thought he could become, and the latter came as an unsurprising relief. For a show that is ostensibly about one of the most mundane of domestic tasks, Let's Tidy Up belies some pretty profound wisdom. With a lightness that appears effortless, Thomas explains how his autism diagnosis arrived as welcome news – and the qualification that yes, life for him is harder than it is for most neurotypical folks. And while (appropriately) non-neurodivergent audience

Palestinian Film Festival

Palestinian Film Festival

“There’s never been a more important time to learn the stories of Palestine," says Naser Shakhtour, Director of Australia's Palestinian Film Festival. And now the Palestinian Film Festival Australia is back, with a program of films from Palestinian filmmakers and storytellers showing across the country, including at the Dendy Newtown. Now in its 12th year, the Palestinian Film Festival Australia will be on in Sydney from March 7 until March 10, before moving on to Canberra, (8-10 March), Brisbane (8-10 March), Adelaide (8-10 March), Hobart (8-10 March), Melbourne (14-17 March) and Perth (15-17 March). The Sydney event will play host to 12 films, including Australian premieres, as well as award-winning features and ground-breaking documentaries.  “The last few months in Gaza and in the West Bank have been, and continue to be, beyond devastating. People everywhere are asking brave questions and actively seeking independent and alternative perspectives,” says Shakhtour. “Our twelfth festival program pays tribute to the continued resistance and resilience of the Palestinian people.” This year’s festival will open with a coming-of-age, socio-political drama Alam, which tells the story of  a Palestinian teen who undergoes a political awakening, sparked by an outspoken new girl at his school. The sci-fi documentary Lyd will make its Australian premiere in Sydney, and other acclaimed films on the program include A Gaza Weekend (Winner of the International Federation of Film Critics P

Groovin' the Moo

Groovin' the Moo

Groovin the Moo 2024 has been cancelled due to insufficient ticket sales. According to the organisers, all ticketholders will be refunded immediately. You can learn more hereIndie music lovers, rejoice – Groovin’ the Moo is coming back to Australia in 2024, and this time its NSW location is a coastal town less than three hours from Sydney. The roaming festival has just announced dates and locations for 2024, and will be popping up across six Australian locations throughout April and May. While the popular, youth-focused alternative music festival – whose 2023 alumni include alt-J, Ocean Alley and Fatboy Slim – generally finds its New South Wales home in Maitland (a city in the Hunter Valley region, two trains and 3.5 hours from Sydney), the 2024 event will be taking place in the coastal town of Newcastle. Jump on the train at Central, and within two hours and 25 minutes you’ll be smack bang in the centre of town. In keeping with the new coastal location, the 2024 line-up is looking cooler than ever – with UK artists Kenya Grace, The Kooks and Mura Masa joining GTM stalwarts including DMA’s, Hot Dub Time Machine, The Jungle Giants, Mallrat and San Cisco.  Music royalty Melanie C (Sporty Spice herself) will also be taking to the stage, along with GZA from Wu-Tang and Alison Wonderland, who hasn’t played to an Australian audience for five years. Other line-up highlights include Stephen Sanchez, Claire Rosinkranz, Jessie Reyez, Armani White, Meduza and (appropriately), The Beache

News (131)

Just in: Qantas has launched a sale with super cheap domestic flights from Sydney

Just in: Qantas has launched a sale with super cheap domestic flights from Sydney

If the official end of summer has inspired you to book a getaway, this is the news you’ve been waiting for. Qantas has launched their Australia Red Tail sale – with discounts on more than one million seats across almost every domestic route. Trip to Byron Bay, anyone?  The sale has launched today (Monday, March 4) and will run for just seven days; so you’ll want to act fast to score your seats.  Fares for economy domestic flights start at $109 one-way, and there are more than 34 routes on sale for under $150 (for travel from April to mid-December 2024). Back in December, Qantas began serving complimentary alcoholic drinks on all domestic flights (from midday onwards). But if you’re looking for the full luxe flight experience, you could score a Business Class seat for as little as $439 (one way). Sydneysiders can head from the Emerald City to the Gold Coast for $109, to Port Macquarie for $139, or to the charming NSW town of Orange for $159. If you’re keen to head further afield, you could travel from Sydney to Alice Springs for just $289, or to the sparkling white shores of Hamilton Island for as little as $199. Getting from Sydney to Canberra will set you back as little as $169, and discounted flights from Sydney to Adelaide start at $159, with flights from Sydney to Melbourne from $139. (All of these prices are for one-way fares, so you’ll need to budget extra if you’re looking for return flights). If you’re keen to upgrade, Business Class seats to Melbourne, Brisbane and C

Sydney is home to 5 of the 10 most Instagrammed spots in Australia (and one of them is surprising)

Sydney is home to 5 of the 10 most Instagrammed spots in Australia (and one of them is surprising)

2024 has been a big year for Bondi. Back in January, the sparkly stretch of sand was crowned as the best beach in the world for people watching by Lonely Planet, and another survey from the online language learning marketplace Preply found that Bondi’s beachgoers are the worst behaved in Australia, according to residents. Now, a survey has awarded Bondi as the most Instagrammed location in the whole country.  The result came off the back of an analysis of Instagram hashtags for 25 popular locations across Australia by data analysers at NZCasinoClub – the hashtag #bondibeach was featured on 1.93 million Instagram posts, giving it the edge over our magnificent Sydney Opera House (whose hashtag was used on 1.05 million posts). Of course, this research is possibly more of an accurate reflection of the proclivity of 'grammers in certain locations to add hashtags to their posts than how "grammable" they are. (If we go off Tripadvisor data, the Opera House is still the number one tourist destination in Sydney, with Bondi Beach coming in a fair bit lower at number 12.) That said, the volumes of posts of Bondi Beach are clearly huge, and a reflection of how photogenic the place is. Half of the top ten most Instagrammed locations were here in the Harbour City – the other Sydney spots that found their way onto the list of the most Instagrammable spots are: Sydney Harbour Bridge (Bridge Climb selfie, anyone?) which came in at number four with 683,400 posts; Darling Harbour, which came in

These stunning pools are one of NSW’s most amazing natural wonders

These stunning pools are one of NSW’s most amazing natural wonders

If you’ve managed to exist on Instagram without coming across these perfectly formed pools, then your algorithm might be in need of a refresh. Formed in the rock face on a beach in the Royal National Park, just outside of Sydney, the Figure Eight Pools have become something of a social media sensation (as far as rockpools go), and not without good reason. What are the Figure 8 Pools? First up, we should clarify: only one of the pools is actually in the shape of a figure of eight. The rockpools (including that perfect double loop) formed on the rocky shelf near Burning Palms Beach are naturally occurring swimming pools, formed from erosion of the rocks by the tide and weather over time.  How to get to the Figure 8 Pools? Accessing the pools isn’t necessarily easy; first up you’ll need to drive an hour out of Sydney to the Garawarra Farm carpark in the Royal National Park. From there, take the walking track for 6km – you’ll go along Garie Road for a while, down a steep hill before joining the Coast Track which will take you all the way to Burning Palms Beach. The walk takes two hours each way  (four hours of walking all up), so you’ll want to give it a miss if you’re not in the mood for a hike. Underfoot, expect steep and challenging terrain; not one to be tackled in thongs, and definitely not suitable for prams or very young children. Note: the park gates lock at 8.30pm, so make sure to allow plenty of time for the two hours of walking there and back (and ample time for dips a

Uber Pool is offering free rides to and from Sydney Mardi Gras this weekend

Uber Pool is offering free rides to and from Sydney Mardi Gras this weekend

In excellent news for those of us planning on partying in platforms this Saturday, Uber has announced that they’ll be slinging free Pool rides throughout Sydney this Saturday to celebrate the spirit of Mardi Gras. Party hopping? Perfect. Uber Pool will be offering free rides between 12pm and 10pm on the big day (tomorrow, Saturday March 2), meaning you can get to the parade and to your after party of choice without spending a dime. Plus, you could find yourself sharing a ride with Triple J star G Flip, who will be riding around Sydney prior to the parade in an Uber Pool decked to the nines with Mardi Gras sparkles and an appropriately solid karaoke setup.  The partnership is good news for Sydneysiders, and good news for members of the queer community across Australia – with Uber making a donation to Minus18 (a charity which supports the rights of young LGBTQI+ Australians) for every Uber Pool trip that G Flip and their fellow festival-goers make around the city.  Key info: free pool rides will be available between 12pm and 10pm on Saturday, March 2, up to the value of $30 – so plan your journey accordingly. If you're keen to ride with G Flip, you'll need to register your interest over here. Persuaded to make it to Oxford Street for the big day? Here’s our Arts & Culture Editor’s guide to navigating the parade   RECOMMENDED: These are the best Mardi Gras parties in Sydney Start your engines: Drag icon Hannah Conda spills the tea with us The hot debate: should bars and festival

Should bars and festivals be allowed on Sydney’s beaches?

Should bars and festivals be allowed on Sydney’s beaches?

For a city with so many beaches, Sydney’s lack of beach clubs and parties comes as a surprise to many a sun-seeking traveller – those who’ve spent time in the likes of Europe, Asia and Central America drinking Margs beneath tasselled umbrellas and dancing on the sand. But if you’re a Sydney local, you’ll know that stretches of sand can’t really be “reserved” for paying punters. Aside from the occasional exception, our beaches are generally party-free zones. A lot of people think this is a great thing – the beach should always be free to access, and not taken over by revellers. Others just wanna party on the beach. The case against parties on the beach is easy to understand: they have the potential to be loud, disruptive, dangerous pollutants to our ocean-side environment (especially if the scenes from Bronte beach on Christmas day are anything to go by).  But then there are events – like the Mardi Gras Bondi Beach Party, which returned last weekend for its second year – that are proof of concept that people do love a beach party (15,000 people have bought tickets to that particular one).  Up in the Gold Coast, electronic music festival Out 2 Lunch (held on Coolangatta Beach) is another popular annual event – selling out 30,000 tickets within hours. According to the ABC, the organiser predicts that the event will inject $5 million into the local economy. Despite potential economic benefits, Waverley Council voted earlier this month to reject any application for “commercial hig

There's been a big jump in Sydney home sale listings – here’s what that means to those in the market

There's been a big jump in Sydney home sale listings – here’s what that means to those in the market

In news that will surprise precisely no-one, Sydney’s housing crisis doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. But despite the relative lack of houses being built in Sydney, home sale listings across the city have surged in recent months – with PropTrack reporting a 27.7 per cent rise in listings in January 2024 – the largest jump since 2011. Is that because house prices in January 2024 reached an all-time high? Quite possibly. We spoke with the team at Domain to learn more about the current state of Sydney’s housing market. "In 2023, the undersupply of new homes, cost-to-build blowouts, a growing population, and a tight rental market continued to boost housing demand, especially for established homes," explained Domain’s economist Dr Nicola Powell. "It's great for buyers to see an uptick in new listings. It also shows that vendor confidence is back in the market, largely due to a more positive outlook on interest rates and house pricing having fully recovered at the end of last year.” In January 2024, Domain reported a 174.5 per cent increase in the number of listings in Sydney compared with the previous month – a figure that includes all property types, and reflects an increase in the confidence of sellers in Sydney, with 20.8 per cent more homes (units and houses) on the market than the same month last year. While Sydney’s property market saw a proportionally more significant rise in the number of units (the number of units on Domain rose by 195.2 per cent compared with the previ

Nooo! Weather experts have reported it's likely that La Niña will return this year

Nooo! Weather experts have reported it's likely that La Niña will return this year

In very bad news for Melbourne's sun lovers and good news for ducks, it looks like La Niña – the weather pattern that increases rainfall, shifts temperature extremes and increases the number of tropical cyclones – will be coming back later this year. The prediction of La Niña's possible rainy return comes from global weather modellers – they’ve released their forecast for a rapid cooling of sea surface temperatures across the equatorial Pacific during the coming months, so it looks like we should prepare to wave goodbye to El Niño and settle in for some damper times ahead.  According to the Bureau of Meteorology, El Niño and La Niña are the climate drivers with the strongest influence on year-to-year climate variability for most of Australia. Part of a natural cycle known as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the varying weather patterns generally operate on a timescale that varies from one to eight years: with the La Niña phenomenon generally only occurring every one to seven years. If 2024 does have to welcome another La Niña, it would mean that Melbourne has sat through four of these rain-drenched seasons in just five years – a frequency that has only occurred twice since 1900. As you may remember from 2022 (Australia’s wettest year on record), La Niña brings with her a whole lot of rain: with Australia recording an average 23 per cent increase in rainfall on the years that La Niña strikes. And although a comeback from our friend La Niña is statistically unlikely, we

This huge platypus refuge centre is now open in NSW

This huge platypus refuge centre is now open in NSW

If you’ve been making more trips to Sydney’s Royal National Park in the hope of spotting a platypus in the wild, this might be the news you’ve been hoping for. To boost the population of these adorable semi-aquatic creatures, Taronga Western Plains Zoo has revealed a $12.1 million platypus refuge to help slow the decline of the species.  Native to Australia, these absurdly adorable animals have been endangered for decades, with their populations across Australia having seen a 31 per cent decline over the past 30 years. Now, conservation organisations across the country are stepping in to help, with Taronga’s $12.1 million Platypus Rescue HQ refuge Austraia's the largest to date.  Photograph: Supplied | Rick Stephens |Taronga Western Plains Zoo The huge, state-of-the-art research space which spans an impressive 2,800sqm (equivalent to more than two Olympic swimming pools) is home to 25 dual-chambered earth tubs and  and 50 7,000 litre water tanks. While it’s currently home to only one little beaked creature by the name of Mackenzie, the additional capacity (it could house up to 65 platypus) exists to house creatures in need in the case of drought, bushfire or flood, with Minister for Climate Change and the Environment Penny Sharpe describing the project as about "preparing for the worst while hoping for the best." As well as providing potential refuge in the case of emergencies, the facility is focused on monitoring playtypus behaviour and preparing them for release into the

This Australian beach has just been crowned as one of the world's best

This Australian beach has just been crowned as one of the world's best

It’s a universal truth that Australia is home to some of the best beaches in the entire world. Back in January, Bondi was crowned as the best beach in the world for people watching by Lonely Planet; Moreton Island’s Tangalooma Beach was named the best beach to see nature, and Lucky Bay (Kepa Kurl) in Western Australia was awarded bragging rights as the top beach to see wildlife. Now, Tripadvisor has revealed its list of the top ten beaches in the world, and Manly has come in at number seven.  While locals love Manly for its delightfully easy access to Norma’s Deli, Tripadvisor highlighted some other major drawcards: gentle waves for surfing, shark-safe and lifeguarded swimming areas, and close proximity to “shops, cafés and more”.  Photograph: Destination NSW | Manly BeachCrowds enjoying a Summer's day at Manly Beach, Manly. Topping Tripadvisor’s Travellers Choice Awards list was Portugal’s Praia da Falésia, which has been awarded a Blue Flag for its cleanliness and ticks all the boxes for a really great beach – long stretch of golden sand for sunbathing, spectacular cliff-top views for walkers, and waves to please both swimmers and surfers. Rounding out the podium were Italy’s Spiaggia dei Conigli and La Concha Beach in San Sebastian, Spain, with Manly being the only beach from Oceania to find its way onto the list.  The annual Travellers Choice lists are compiled based on the opinions of millions of users, with the top ten spots awarded to destinations that receive a high

About 450 people fell down the gap at Sydney train stations in a year – here's what's being done to stop it

About 450 people fell down the gap at Sydney train stations in a year – here's what's being done to stop it

Last week, we learnt that the air pollution in Sydney’s train stations is unhealthily high. But something we've been warned about at NSW train stations for far longer is to "Mind the gap". For good reason – about 450 people (more than one person every day) fell down the gap between trains and platforms in 2023, and the NSW Government has decided that the “mind the gap” announcement is no longer cutting it. To bridge the space between train doors and platforms, Transport for NSW will begin installing mechanical gap fillers between trains and platforms to make our daily commute a little less risky. Unsurprisingly, children and elderly people are the most at risk from Sydney’s varying train-to-platform gaps, which are largest at the city’s older stations. When a train platform features curves, it’s more likely for the gap between the doors and platform to be a little too large – with the widest gap (about 31 centimetres) seen at Dulwich Hill Station.   Part of the redevelopment of the Metro rail line between Sydenham and Bankstown will see 170 mechanical gap fillers fitted at its stations with curved platforms (all except Wiley Park and Bankstown). The mechanical platform gap fillers are being imported from South Korea, where they’re used on the metro rail network across Seoul.  At other stations across the city, rubber gap fillers are being installed to allow passengers a safe step on and off the train. These rubber gap fillers were first installed at Circular Quay back in 2021

Taylor Swift has left the building… Here are the Next Big Things to look forward to in Sydney in 2024

Taylor Swift has left the building… Here are the Next Big Things to look forward to in Sydney in 2024

If you’re feeling that post-Taylor comedown, you’re not alone. Over the weekend, 320,000 people in Sydney went to see the queen of pop (the world?) light up the stage with her spectacular three-plus-hour performance. And if you’re wondering how to recapture some of that collective euphoria, we’re here to help. We’ve put together a list of some of the brightest and best events to look forward to this year – in no particular order. There are always a million things going on in Sydney, so for this round-up we chose the events that we thought might appeal to the Swiftie within. And yes, it’s still totally fine to give a friendship bracelet to a stranger.  Sydney Mardi Gras Parade In sweet divine timing, the year’s annual glitter fest comes just days after Taylor leaves town – meaning you can reuse your sequin-studded attire and nobody will bat an eyelid. Check out one of the love-themed parties, or don your sparkliest outfit and head out onto Oxford Street for the Parade.   & Juliet This pop-soundtracked remix of the most famous love story ever told brings some – if not all – of the high energy melodic euphoria that a Taylor show entails. You can catch it at Sydney Lyric Theatre from today (Tuesday, February 27). Easter long weekend Few things beat a long weekend, and Easter really does the heavy lifting, giving us not three but four days off in a row (from March 29 to April 1 – and we're not even April's Fooling you). If you’re keen to get out of town, check out our favourite

Bad news for sun lovers: It looks likely that La Niña will return to Sydney soon

Bad news for sun lovers: It looks likely that La Niña will return to Sydney soon

In very bad news for Sydney's beach lovers and good news for our water supply, it looks like La Niña – the weather pattern that increases our rainfall, shifts temperature extremes and increases the number of tropical cyclones – will be coming back later this year. The prediction of La Niña's possible rainy return comes from global weather modellers – they’ve released their forecast for a rapid cooling of sea surface temperatures across the equatorial Pacific during the coming months, so it looks like we should prepare to wave goodbye to El Niño and settle in for some damper times ahead. Sydney recorded it's muggiest day on record earlier this year, and it looks like we could be in for more on the precipitation front. According to the Bureau of Meteorology, El Niño and La Niña are the climate drivers with the strongest influence on year-to-year climate variability for most of Australia. Part of a natural cycle known as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the varying weather patterns generally operate on a timescale that varies from one to eight years: with the La Niña phenomenon generally only occurring every one to seven years. If 2024 does have to welcome another La Niña, it would mean that Sydney has sat through four of these rain-drenched seasons in just five years – a frequency that has only occurred twice since 1900. As you may remember from 2022 (Australia’s wettest year on record), La Niña brings with her a whole lot of rain: with Australia recording an average 2