11 best Indian restaurants in Singapore

Fuel up on the island’s best curries, briyanis, chicken tikkas, thosai, idli and more. Are you salivating yet? By Priyanka C Agarwal
Zaffron Kitchen
By Time Out Singapore editors |
Advertising

Can you handle the heat? Spice your life (and diet) by eating your way through these Indian restaurants in Singapore. Featuring north Indian cuisine to Bengali dishes, we scour the city to bring you a delicious roundup of the best Indian eateries and curry houses in town. 

GET VOCAL FOR YOUR LOCAL: Vote for your favourite restaurants now

Restaurants, Indian

Kailash Parbat Restaurant

icon-location-pin Little India

At Kailash Parbat Restaurant, its interiors are as busy and chaotic as its menus. But don't be overwhelmed by the sheer number of choices, here's how to narrow it down. Among its signature dishes, the chole bhatura is a hands-down favourite while the restaurant's chickpea curry served with puri is spicy yet sinfully good.

TRY its Sundays-only special, the Dal Pakwan ($7.50). It's a Sindhi dish of curried Bengal gram lentils served with deep-fried flatbreads and sweet and spicy chutneys.

Restaurants, Indian

Rang Mahal

icon-location-pin City Hall

With slick stonework and glass, mood lighting and luxury finishings, this does not feel like your typical Indian restaurant. But the scent of lingering spices – not to mention the tables laden with curries and lassis – gives the game away. Its menu includes luxed up Indian street eats, comforting share plates and a couple of dramatic dishes. The most impressive is the tandoori fondue ($58), where a buttery tomato sauce with five kinds of cheese are served with a variety of flavoured chicken kebabs and cubed garlic naan as dippers.

TRY its rendition of the parsi kheema bao ($55). It's a spicy minced lamb curry served wit homemade buttered buns.

Advertising
Restaurants, Indian

Shahi Maharani

icon-location-pin City Hall

‘Shahi’ means royal in Hindi, so go in with a king-sized appetite when you arrive at this north Indian restaurant. Its forte lies in its tandoor-cooked kebabs, rich curries and frankly, the best Tarka Dhal ($19) in the city. The restaurant's heavy handed with the use of aromatics and spices, and the gravies are rich with cream, nuts and luxe touches like saffron.

TRY the malai kofta curry ($25) where potato, cottage cheese and raisin parcels are swimming in a creamy cashew gravy. Soak up all the goodness with a piece of pillowy butter naan ($8).

Restaurants, Indian

Zaffron Kitchen

icon-location-pin Marine Parade

Zaffron Kitchen’s East Coast Road outlet boasts a ‘family restaurant’ vibe with its children’s play while its Westgate branch is a tad more trendy and hip. The food however, is consistently good at both. Top picks include the dum chicken briyani ($14.50), which comes in a bowl sealed with dough, that you need to break through the release the delicious saffron-laced aroma of dum-cooked rice and curried chicken.


TRY its chicken tikka wrap ($14) – naan-wrapped chicken kebabs served with chutney and fries – instead of going for the heavy curries and dals. It makes for a great grab-and-go meal.

Advertising
Restaurants, Indian

Urban Roti

icon-location-pin Raffles Place

The spiffiest spot for curries and kebabs at Lau Pa Sat Festival Market, Urban Roti’s quality is affirmed by its lunchtime regulars. The chicken kebabs here are deliciously smoky, and we like the green chilli laced one for the kick it delivers ($16). It also whips up clever fusion such as its Cuba Libre Kebab, where the chicken is marinated with rum ($18). There's also a bar that serves everything from wines and spirits to cocktails and beer.

TRY the Kingfisher ($10). It's an Indian brand beer that makes a great accompaniment to its spicy kebabs.

Restaurants, Indian

Mustard

icon-location-pin Little India

If you've never tried Bengali food, Mustard's a good place to get started. The mustard oil and paste-laced dishes from the Coastal state of Bengal are authentic in flavour and the menu is varied. We suggest trying every dish but start with the chingri maacher malai curry ($24.10), coconut curried prawns served within a green coconut, and a piece of the macher paturi ($21.10) that' a boneless filet marinated in mustard paste and then wrapped in a banana leaf to steam cook.

TRY cholar dal (spiced Bengal gram lentils sweetened with coconut) and the aloo jhuri ($7.90), a portion of thinly sliced potatoes, deep fried into crisps, to sprinkle over each bite.

Advertising
Restaurants, Indian

Annalakshmi

icon-location-pin Tanjong Pagar

Among Singapore’s more unique dining experiences, Annalakshmi is a buffet of all you can eat, for whatever you wish to pay. Its Havelock Road outlet serves a spread of home-style cuisine and is completely volunteer run. Stuff yourself with servings of briyani, poori, appam, vegetable stew, potato palya (dry, spiced potatoes) and cauliflower curry among a slew of other north and south Indian home-cooked dishes. At dinner time, you can even order off a menu.

TRY everything! Because the spread is different each time you visit.

Restaurants, Indian

The Song of India

icon-location-pin Newton

Head Chef Manjunath Mural’s menus are constantly being reinvented with recipes both traditional and adventurous. Indulge in its laksa chicken kebab ($38), succulent chicken tikkas with a subtle aroma of daun kesom, and a caviar-topped Barramundi Kebab ($38), that's fish slathered with spicy sambal.

TRY lamb kofta vindaloo ($41). It's minced lamb in a spicy-sour gravy and finished with dainty quail eggs.

Advertising
Restaurants, Indian

Tandoor

icon-location-pin Orchard

Tandoor has been serving Indian food to loyal patrons for the past three decades. Although the menu and space have undergone plenty of revamps, the quality of the food remains unchanged. Its forte lies in Indian coastal cuisine. Unlike the more familiar North Indian dishes like kebabs and curries, coastal cuisine features seafood, coconut-laced gravies, whole spices and the liberal use of curry leaves.

TRY the tart and sweet Mangalorean mango curry ($30) along with the heavily spiced tawa meen ($40), seabass covered with onion-tomato paste and then chargrilled.

Restaurants, Indian

MTR

icon-location-pin Farrer Park

The Singapore outpost of Bangalore institution Mavalli Tiffin Room (MTR) serves arguably the best thosai on the island. For starters, it's the Karnataka-style thosai ($5 for plain) of fermented rice and black lentils griddle is cooked to perfection. It’s a 60-year-old recipe that needs no modification. Hearty, moreish and sinfully ghee-laced, its served with sambhar and chutney. Don't be afraid to ask for more ghee, the restaurant is happy to serve you more.

TRY MTR serves daily specials on rotation and these include the ragi thosai ($5), which has an earthy taste and nutty aroma unlike any other you may have tried.

Advertising
Restaurants, Indian

Samy's Curry Restaurant

icon-location-pin Tanglin

A dyed-in-the-wool local institution, Samy’s is as low-maintenance as they come. It’s more of a mess hall than a restaurant with its high ceilings, shuttered windows and ceiling fans. In place of plates are banana leaves, onto which servers slop mounds of aromatic, richly flavoured and head-hurting hot curries. Cool down with some fresh lime juice.

TRY rasam, a tamarind and tomato soup, to finish off any leftover rice.

Advertising