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The best camping sites in Hong Kong

Looking for a getaway that’ll get you back to nature without leaving the SAR? We compile the best camping spots in Hong Kong for that special weekend

Kelvin Tse
Nam Shan Camping Site

Despite Hong Kong’s urban focus, there are plenty of opportunities to be outdoorsy and atheltic in our great city. Whether it’s swimming, hiking or cycling you fancy, we’ve got you covered with lists of all the best spots. But in case you fancy more than just a day in the great outdoors, we’ve put together this compilation of the best locations for a rugged weekend getaway and where to get your camping from, too.

Hong Kong’s best camping spots

Tai Long Sai Wan

If you really want to escape the rat race the beach at Tai Long Sai Wan is one of the most idyllic spots in HK. Come during the week if you want to avoid the crowds. Apart from the breath-taking sea view, it’s also home to Sheung Luk Stream, the biggest in Hong Kong. If you walk a bit further north to Ham Tin Wan, you can rent tents, sleeping bags and surfboards.

How to get there: Take the MTR to Choi Hung station and jump on a green minibus (1A) to Sai Kung Town. Take another minibus (29R) from outside McDonald’s and alight at Sai Wan Pavilion. Follow the signposts and paths to Sai Wan for 40 minutes.

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Shek O

Hok Tau

This picturesque site on the northern slope of Shek Au Shan places campers amidst lush trees, vibrant wildlife and a freshwater stream. Getting here is relatively straightforward and there are bathrooms with flush toilets as well as barbecue pits. Challenge yourself by hiking up one of the nearby trails such as Ping Fung Shan and Pat Sin Leng.

How to get there: Take a minibus (52B) from Fanling MTR Station and get off at Hok Tau Tsuen Terminus. Walk along Hok Tau Road towards Hok Tau Reservoir for around 15 minutes before reaching the campsite.

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New Territories

Long Ke Wan Beach

Feel like you’re worlds away from the city as you set up camp and take in the crystal-clear water and fine sand at Long Ke Wan. The campsite here has barbecue pits aplenty, as well as benches, tables and a seasonal water source. Bring your own supplies though, just in case. This is as basic as it gets in Hong Kong.

How to get there: Take the MTR to Choi Hung station and grab a green minibus (1A) to Sai Kung Town. Take a taxi from there to the East Dam at High Island Reservoir, where it’s a 20 minute walk up to Long Ke Wan.

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Sai Kung
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Nam Shan Campsite

When it comes to size, Nam Shan Barbecue Area tops them all. The largest barbecue area in Lantau Country Park, Nam Shan’s vast lush grassland can accommodate up to 100 picnic goers at a time and is located in a valley and woodland, creating a natural, tranquil paradise for campers. To top it all off, take in the panoramic sights of Mui Wo and Pui O Bay.

How to get there: Take the MTR to Tung Chung station. Afterwards, take a bus (3M) at the bus terminus and alight at Nam Shan. Another option is simply to take any bus from Mui Wo. They all pass Nam Shan.

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Lantau Island

Tap Mun

Also known as Grass Island, Tap Mun sits in the sea off Sai Kung Country Park and is best known for its beautiful, rolling hills complete with wandering cows. Though there’s no official campsite, campers can pitch a tent at the grassy areas atop the southern headland of Tap Mun, which provide breathtaking panoramic views of the island. Visit Tap Mun’s famous trio of temples and fuel up at the fisherman village’s main restaurants, Sun Hon Kee.

How to get there: Get on the 94 or 96R (weekends only) bus to Wong Shek Pier. The ferry runs every one or two hours throughout the week. The last ferry back from Tap Mun leaves at 6pm or 6.05pm each day. Ferries also run, less regularly, from Ma Liu Shui near University MTR station.

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New Territories

Wan Tsai Peninsula

Who doesn’t love a starry starry night? Bring a telescope and sleep under the stars in Wan Tsai South, which is well equipped with cooking, large-scale bathing and toilet facilities. Lying on the northwest fringe of Long Harbour, the easily accessible Wan Tsai Peninsula also promises picturesque views of Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park.

How to get there: From Sai Kung Bus Terminus take a bus (94) to Wong Shek Terminus. Once there, hop straight on to the Wan Tsai-bound ferry at Wong Shek Pier. Once you’re back on dry land it’s just a five minute walk over to the campsite.

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Sai Kung
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Treasure Island Campsite

With calm waters and shallow surf, the flat shoreline of Pui O Beach resembles an extensive glossy mirror. After a fun day at the beach, head to Pui O Campsite where barbecue pits, camp bays and arbours are available. The public camp spots at Pui O Campsite can be rented on a first-come-first-served basis except on public holidays. But for camping rookies – or lazy bees who have no appetite for unnecessary fuss – online bookings are available to have expert staff set up everything for you.

How to get there: Take the ferry from Central to Mui Wo, then catch a bus (1 or 4) from the ferry terminal to Pui O. $500 (four-person tent), $700 (six-person tent) per night.

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Lantau Island

Tung Ping Chau

Turn on your radar and discover strange and mysterious landforms on Tung Ping Chau such as the famous Kang Lau Shek (Barbican Stone), a spectacular stack overlooking the sea, and Lung Lok Shui (Dragon Enters Water), a siltstone bed that looks like a wriggling dragon back. The campsite is also the perfect place to bask in glowing moonlight or to catch the sunrise. The site is well-equipped with barbecue pits, dry toilets, tables and benches.

How to get there: Hop on a Tsui Wah ferry at Ma Liu Shui Pier and disembark at Wong Ye Kok Pier on Tung Ping Chau. Thereafter, walk for about 20 minutes towards Sha Tau Tsuen. $90 (round-trip Tsui Wah ferry fare). 

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Shenzhen

Yuen Ng Fan (Nam Fung Wan)

For those of you looking for some intense exercise before you relax, Yuen Ng Fan Campsite is the one to go for. Not for the faint-hearted, you have to tackle a strenuous hike and thrive on limited facilities once you’re there, but the reward is not only a magnificent view of High Island Reservoir but also a series of extreme water sports ranging from surfing and windsurfing to sampan riding, canoeing and kayaking in Chong Hing Water Sports Centre at West Dam.

How to get there: Hop on bus 94 at Sai Kung Bus Terminus (weekdays) or 96R at Diamond Hill Bus Terminus (public holidays) to Pak Tam Chung. Walk along Man Yee Road towards High Island Reservoir for around 45 minutes. Then you’ll come to the junction of Sheung Yiu Country Trail and Man Yee Road on your right-hand side (on a secondary dam before West Dam). Turn into the country trail and walk for around 15 minutes.

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Sai Kung
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The best places to buy camping gear

Eikowada

Eikowada is a European brand that offers a wide selection of sportswear and outdoor gear suitable for both local camping and hiking activities and strenuous sports in extreme weather. You'll find trekking poles and comfy windbreakers.

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Yuen Long

Protrek (Admiralty)

Protrek is the largest online and offline outdoor specialty retailer in Hong Kong that provides everything from head to toe amongst its thousands of products. Your one-stop shop for all things camping from headlamps, rain covers, and the all-useful spork. 

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Admiralty

RC Outfitters

Founded in 2001, RC Outfitters offers a wide range of camping, hiking and rock climbing gear sourced from Taiwan, Korea, Europe and the United States. Stock up on all your needs whether it’s sleeping bags, foldable cups and tents, RC has got them all. Happy shopping! 

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Causeway Bay
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World Sports and Co.

Find competitive prices for your camping products at this local store that sells outdoor gear sourced from the United States and Japan. Offering camping gears like travel-friendly gas stoves, backpacks, tents and torches, we suggest bringing a friend who speaks Cantonese before shopping at this Mong Kok store. 

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Mong Kok

Comments

1 comments
Katherine R
Katherine R

Be careful! There are numerous landslides right now around Long Ke Wan and Big Wave Bay. I tried to hike yesterday with some friends and the road to the Sai Wan Pagoda trail head is washed out. So we tried hiking to Ham Tim from the other direction and had to turn around where the path was washed out with a pile of uprooted plants almost as tall as ourselves.