Restaurants & Cafés

Your guide to dining out in Hong Kong, including restaurant reviews, new restaurants and the best restaurants in the city

The best Hong Kong outdoor barbecue places
Restaurants

The best Hong Kong outdoor barbecue places

With Hong Kong well into autumn, there’s no better time to head outdoors armed with your trusty barbecue fork for a good ol’ BBQ session. From beachside spots to sprawling green spaces inside a country park, we explore the best spots to put a shrimp on the barby. 

The best cookies in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best cookies in Hong Kong

Cookies are simple circles of joy that can be levelled up in oh-so-many sweet and delicious ways. Whether you prefer them filled with chocolate chips, looking totally Insta-worthy or even tasting like Ovaltine, we follow the crumbs to find the best Hong Kong has to offer.

The best things to eat in Hong Kong right now
Restaurants

The best things to eat in Hong Kong right now

It’s no secret that we’re spoilt for choice when it comes to food choices in this city. But with so many options, it can be difficult to tell the good from the bad and the ugly. Fortunately, our team of taste-testers here at Time Out Hong Kong are happy to do the leg and stomach work for you. Whether it’s dishes from new restaurants or revamped menus or simply golden oldies that we’ve fallen in love with again, here’s our regularly updated hit list of the best things to chow down on right now. RECOMMENDED: Check out our guide to the best restaurants in Hong Kong for even more delicious eats.

The five best Hong Kong restaurants for hairy crab right now
Restaurants

The five best Hong Kong restaurants for hairy crab right now

From classic Shanghainese crab roe xiao long bao to Japanese-style hairy crab omakase, these are the five best seasonal menus in Hong Kong to get your hands – or claws – on.

The best new restaurants and bars to try
Restaurants

The best new restaurants and bars to try

Hongkongers are spoilt for choice when it comes to dining out, especially since every month brings a plethora of exciting new dining options. From traditional Chinese to high-end sushi, casual cafés to hipster hangouts, there’s always somewhere new to eat at. To help you keep on top of your eating game, here’s a list of the buzziest openings in town, updated on a regular basis.As always with new venues, be sure to call ahead to make sure there are no changes to opening dates and times.

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Latest Hong Kong restaurant reviews

Chullschick
Restaurants

Chullschick

The artwork that adorns the walls of ChullsChick is some of the best we’ve seen in Soho in recent months. It’s not just because it’s hilarious (one part features a llama sporting a wig and sunglasses), but because it literally illustrates chef-owner Abel Ortiz Alvarez’s love for his home country of Peru. On the night we visit the restaurant, a small outfit on the upper stretch of Graham Street, the television is tuned into a travel doc featuring the rolling hills of the country. And then there’s the food, which includes some of the most popular dishes eaten in Peru. The main sell here is the pollo a la brasa, a style of rotisserie chicken that was created by a Swiss businessman in Lima in the 1950s and has since become so popular in Peru, it even has a day named after it. The original recipe uses a saltwater marinade known as salamuera. At ChullsChick, Alvera puts his own spin on the bird by bathing it for two days in a mix of dark beer, herbs and spices. The chicken is then cooked in a custom rotisserie until the skin crisps up and blackens in parts. The meat, meanwhile, remains luscious and tender and pulls clean off the bone in the manner that only really well-cooked meat can accomplish. It’s a shame then that the flavours from the beer-based marinade don’t penetrate deep enough into the flesh, although the disappointment is easily rectified with a smear of aji amarillo sauce. The portion you order – quarter for $88, half for $138 or whole for $268 – dictates the numb

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Popinjays
Restaurants

Popinjays

When it comes to rooftop spaces in this city, the widely accepted rule is if you've got it, flaunt it. That’s what The Murray hotel does with Popinjays, the crowning gem of its F&B portfolio. Accessible by a private elevator, the penthouse venue has a bar on one side and the restaurant on the other. It's encased in floor-to-ceiling windows with a wraparound terrace that looks out in all directions to surrounding high-rises. While the acoustics could use some improvement – right now, it's difficult to hear the staff, even if they’re standing tableside – the space is a stunner, a cool blend of class and playfulness, with plenty of Kaws artwork to embellish the walls. This showiness is apt for a restaurant that derives its name from the old-fashioned term for a parrot. Expect plenty of fowl language here, beginning with the 'aviary' cocktail selection where the Pecking Order ($130) roosts. Made with tom yum-infused Nusa Caña rum with yuzu, elderflower, lime and mint soda, it's extremely drinkable with its candy-like sourness and just a slight touch of heat. In terms of food, there's the Birds of a Feather sharing menu ($990 per person) served on Fridays and Saturdays, as well as a four or six-course degustation option ($980-$1,280) on Tuesdays to Thursdays. Deciding to fly in a different direction, we order à la carte, starting with the Hokkaido scallop and sea urchin carpaccio ($260). It's a disappointing opener, the mollusc being thick and creamy but lacking any sweetness. M

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Old Bailey
Restaurants

Old Bailey

Since opening to the public at the end of last month, Tai Kwun has been hailed as a major success for Hong Kong’s art and culture community. But aside from the exhibitions, film screenings and theatre performances hosted within its historic walls, the former Central Police Station compound has also given us something else: a score of hip and sophisticated restaurants, among which stands Old Bailey.The latest restaurant by JIA Group (also responsible for the likes of Rhoda, Duddell’s and Tai Kwun's jail-cell watering hole, Behind Bars, among others), Old Bailey boasts the kind of bright and airy roominess and stunning skyscraper views elusive to many space-starved, ground-level eateries in Soho. The 3,000sq ft space is a polished, contemporary take on mid-century modern, punctuated in the right places with tasteful pieces of furniture inspired by the Ming Dynasty. In the bar and lounge area, guests can enjoy speciality brews and cakes by Teakha throughout the day, while the main dining room serves as the backdrop for Old Bailey’s Jiangnan menu.Dishes are based on traditional recipes, such as the homemade handkerchief pasta ($148), which is inspired by a rustic village dish. More like thin, floury pancakes, this ‘pasta’ is pan-fried until chewy, golden and blistered, and coarsely chopped and served with seasonal greens – brilliantly crisp, jade-green bok choy on the night that we visit. It’s surprisingly satisfying for something so simple. Another winner is the tea smoked pigeo

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Yakiniku Jumbo
Restaurants

Yakiniku Jumbo

It’s been a busy few months for local restaurant group Global Link. After bringing Tokyo’s three-Michelin-starred Sushi Saito to our shores in March, the F&B team recently launched the first overseas outpost of Yakiniku Jumbo – a grilled meats institute with more than 30 years of history in Tokyo. Located in a prime spot close to the Central–Mid-Levels escalator, the Hong Kong venue is simple and sophisticated, dressed in blacks and natural woods in an understated manner. In this comfortable space, which seats about 50, guests can enjoy some of the finest grades of wagyu, sourced from all across Japan. The meat is flown in daily from Jumbo’s Tokyo store, chilled and never frozen, to ensure minimal changes to flavour, freshness and texture. During the early stages of its opening, Yakiniku Jumbo only offers omakase for dinner ($1,280). On the night of our visit, this nine-courser begins with a beef yukke. Made with raw meat from the inner thigh and dressed in tare, it’s a simple but thoroughly satisfying way to start the meal. We also try the wagyu nigiri, featuring a slice seared ever-so-slightly so that the fat melts into the rice below. Another highlight is the sextet of grilled wagyu rare cuts. They’re all hand-sliced by Jumbo’s experienced chefs, who ensure that every piece that makes it to the grill boasts just the right amount of marbling without being too fatty or sinewy. Every cut boasts its own distinct texture and flavour profile. The kalbi is rich while the zabuto

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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Cheap eats in Hong Kong

Ultimate egg sandwich showdown
Restaurants

Ultimate egg sandwich showdown

A humble egg sandwich can bring the biggest of joys. Here’s where to get the best.

All 16 McDonald’s Hong Kong burgers ranked
Restaurants

All 16 McDonald’s Hong Kong burgers ranked

What to order and what to leave for Grimace at McDonald’s in Hong Kong.

The best cheap eats in the New Territories
Restaurants

The best cheap eats in the New Territories

Our city is a gastronomic paradise, but you don’t have to spend a fortune to eat well.

The 10 best uniquely Hong Kong dishes
Restaurants

The 10 best uniquely Hong Kong dishes

The very best local specialities here in the 852.

Hong Kong’s top 10 pork chop rice dishes
Restaurants

Hong Kong’s top 10 pork chop rice dishes

We’re talking about ju paa, that beautiful combination of pork and rice.

Every Burger King burger ranked from worst to best
Restaurants

Every Burger King burger ranked from worst to best

So loosen your belt and join us as we rank every Burger King burger from worst to best.

The best restaurants in Hong Kong

The best restaurants in Tai Kok Tsui
Restaurants

The best restaurants in Tai Kok Tsui

Until recently, Tai Kok Tsui was considered something of a dead zone. Stranded in west Kowloon without an MTR station, the neighbourhood was perceived as an industrial area, like the Kwun Tong of old, with little appeal for visitors. Not any more, though. TKT is buzzing. No MTR means more affordable rent and that’s allowed a number of exciting small restaurants to establish themselves. Cantonese, Japanese omakase, Mediterranean cuisine – you can get just about anything in the neighbourhood these days. Not sure where to start? Read on for our guide to Tai Kok Tsui’s best restaurants.And if the area seems too far to go, try our guide to the best restaurants in Tai Po or North Point instead. Or simply go straight to our feature on Hong Kong’s best restaurants. By Sam Sinha

The best restaurants in Sham Shui Po
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The best restaurants in Sham Shui Po

Sham Shui Po is home to mean cheap eats and mouthwatering street food

The best brunches in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best brunches in Hong Kong

With so many choices in Hong Kong, where do you begin?

The best food in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best food in Hong Kong

Some of our city’s must-try food and tell you where best to try it

The best restaurants in Yuen Long
Restaurants

The best restaurants in Yuen Long

Sure, the Hello Kitty Farm may have lost its license but that doesn’t mean there’s no reason to head to Yuen Long. The New Territories neighbourhood has been revitalised by the Yoho Mall (and that cinema that offers hash browns) and there’s a range of excellent restaurants to try, from cheap eats and cha chaan teng favourites to super fresh sushi and HK-style desserts. Think it’s too far for you to go? Well, if you’re looking for something a bit closer to home, why not try our guide to the best restaurants in Kennedy Town or Sham Shui Po as alternatives? By Sam Sinha

The best dim sum in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best dim sum in Hong Kong

From traditional dim sum spots, to the cheapest Michelin starred restaurants.