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Restaurants & Cafés

Your guide to dining out in Hong Kong, including restaurant reviews, new restaurants and the best restaurants in the city

17 best restaurants in Sheung Wan
Restaurants

17 best restaurants in Sheung Wan

From dim sum to Indian and Nepalese to Chinese-meets-French cuisine worthy of Michelin acclaim, Sheung Wan has it all. Here are the top picks in this booming ’hood. 

8 best cooked food markets in Hong Kong
Restaurants

8 best cooked food markets in Hong Kong

Nowhere helps you save money while still eating great meals quite like the city’s cooked food centres. Check out these food stalls the next time you’re looking to eat on a budget without sacrificing quality.

7 best upstairs cafés and coffeeshops in Hong Kong you need to visit
Restaurants

7 best upstairs cafés and coffeeshops in Hong Kong you need to visit

From trendy spots that offer seriously Instagrammable dishes to joints that double up as vintage stores, here are some of the best upstairs cafes our city has to offer.

Best restaurants in Quarry Bay and Tai Koo
Restaurants

Best restaurants in Quarry Bay and Tai Koo

Whether you're fuelling up before a hike or looking for a fun night out far from the madding crowd, check out these great restaurants, bars and cafés in Quarry Bay and Tai Koo. 

5 hacks that will save you money on food in Hong Kong
Restaurants

5 hacks that will save you money on food in Hong Kong

Trust these life hacks to cut down on costs and score seats at the restaurants you want to try.

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Latest Hong Kong restaurant reviews

Mashi No Mashi
Restaurants

Mashi No Mashi

The quiet stretch of Oi Kwan Road has lit up recently with the arrival of a neon sign showing two monkeys. Depicted in chef uniforms and wielding strands of noodle and slabs of beef, these novel creatures are the mascots of Mashi No Mashi, the first wagyu tsukemen restaurant in town. This new spot boasts serious street cred, being co-opened by the same team behind neighbouring Wagyumafia (aka the creators of the world’s most expensive beef sandwich) as well as La Rambla and Elephant Grounds. Much like its slightly older sister restaurant next door, Mashi No Mashi is cool and minimalistic, with counter seating that only runs 12 chairs deep. The service is equally simple, with an automated ticket machine near the entrance from which guests place their orders. There are only three noodles to choose from – the regular tsukemen ($80), wagyu tsukemen ($130) and the tokusei wagyu tsukemen ($160). We go for the most expensive option, which comes with around 150g of noodles topped with a slice of Kobe beef, bamboo shoots, cabbage, nori and half a soft-boiled egg. The main attraction, of course, is the meat, which is the same Ozaki beef used at Wagyumafia. The brisket is used here, chosen especially for its balanced fat-to-meat ratio. It’s served as a large, thin sheet and, torched to our requested medium, melts like warm butter on the tongue. Tokusei wagyu tsukemen If wagyu is the star though, then the dipping sauce is the soul. At Mashi No Mashi, the complex and layered base is

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Aulis
Restaurants

Aulis

There are two breeds of envelope-pushing restaurants. One is the enfant terrible type that brashly rebels against white-tablecloth norms by way of powders, smokes and multisensory menus. The other is the quiet, introspective kind – the type that alters your notion of dining without you even realising it. Aulis, Simon Rogan’s first foray into the Hong Kong dining scene, sits in the latter category. The concept already exists in the UK, where it acts as a testing ground for dishes at the British chef’s Michelin-starred establishments in Cartmel and London. It’s the same idea in Hong Kong, where ideas are hatched, plated and served to no more than 12 guests at a time. Whatever dishes prove successful make it past a large sliding door and onto the menu of Aulis’ more conventional sister restaurant, Roganic. In essence, diners at Aulis are guinea pigs for Roganic. It’s fitting then that the space exudes a sort of lab-like aesthetic. It’s stark and smooth with Miele equipment built seamlessly into wide grey countertops. The only feature that juts out is the hibachi grill, which is used to char some of the tastiest local vegetables we’ve had in a while (more on that later). In this arena, the chefs move through an ever-changing, multi-course menu ($1,480) with the agility of an athlete and the precision of a surgeon (be prepared for a lot of tweezer action). On the night of our visit, our dinner turns out to be 20 dishes deep and starts with a host of delicate small bites. There

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Chullschick
Restaurants

Chullschick

The artwork that adorns the walls of ChullsChick is some of the best we’ve seen in Soho in recent months. It’s not just because it’s hilarious (one part features a llama sporting a wig and sunglasses), but because it literally illustrates chef-owner Abel Ortiz Alvarez’s love for his home country of Peru. On the night we visit the restaurant, a small outfit on the upper stretch of Graham Street, the television is tuned into a travel doc featuring the rolling hills of the country. And then there’s the food, which includes some of the most popular dishes eaten in Peru. The main sell here is the pollo a la brasa, a style of rotisserie chicken that was created by a Swiss businessman in Lima in the 1950s and has since become so popular in Peru, it even has a day named after it. The original recipe uses a saltwater marinade known as salamuera. At ChullsChick, Alvera puts his own spin on the bird by bathing it for two days in a mix of dark beer, herbs and spices. The chicken is then cooked in a custom rotisserie until the skin crisps up and blackens in parts. The meat, meanwhile, remains luscious and tender and pulls clean off the bone in the manner that only really well-cooked meat can accomplish. It’s a shame then that the flavours from the beer-based marinade don’t penetrate deep enough into the flesh, although the disappointment is easily rectified with a smear of aji amarillo sauce. The portion you order – quarter for $88, half for $138 or whole for $268 – dictates the numb

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Popinjays
Restaurants

Popinjays

When it comes to rooftop spaces in this city, the widely accepted rule is if you've got it, flaunt it. That’s what The Murray hotel does with Popinjays, the crowning gem of its F&B portfolio. Accessible by a private elevator, the penthouse venue has a bar on one side and the restaurant on the other. It's encased in floor-to-ceiling windows with a wraparound terrace that looks out in all directions to surrounding high-rises. While the acoustics could use some improvement – right now, it's difficult to hear the staff, even if they’re standing tableside – the space is a stunner, a cool blend of class and playfulness, with plenty of Kaws artwork to embellish the walls. This showiness is apt for a restaurant that derives its name from the old-fashioned term for a parrot. Expect plenty of fowl language here, beginning with the 'aviary' cocktail selection where the Pecking Order ($130) roosts. Made with tom yum-infused Nusa Caña rum with yuzu, elderflower, lime and mint soda, it's extremely drinkable with its candy-like sourness and just a slight touch of heat. In terms of food, there's the Birds of a Feather sharing menu ($990 per person) served on Fridays and Saturdays, as well as a four or six-course degustation option ($980-$1,280) on Tuesdays to Thursdays. Deciding to fly in a different direction, we order à la carte, starting with the Hokkaido scallop and sea urchin carpaccio ($260). It's a disappointing opener, the mollusc being thick and creamy but lacking any sweetness. M

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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The best restaurants in Hong Kong

The best dim sum in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best dim sum in Hong Kong

From traditional dim sum spots, to the cheapest Michelin starred restaurants.

Hong Kong’s best street food essentials
Restaurants

Hong Kong’s best street food essentials

Hong Kong’s street food scene is known the world over. Whether you’re in Causeway Bay or Mong Kok, Tsuen Wan or Sham Shui Po, you’re bound to find some delicious streetside snacks, be it curry fishballs on a stick or fluffy eggettes in various flavours. Best of all, these tasty tidbits are usually wallet-friendly and can easily fill up your belly for just a few bucks. While our city also boasts some of the world’s best restaurants, Michelin-starred dining and other delicious eats, no Hong Kong experience is complete without sampling some – or all – of these street food favourites.RECOMMENDED: If you’re hungry and you know it, grab a slice of pizza or check out the best dim sum spots in town.

The best food in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best food in Hong Kong

Hong Kong is a true food paradise, with some of the world’s very best restaurants, from cheap eats and street food to high-end Michelin-starred eateries. But what makes Hong Kong’s dining scene truly unique is undoubtedly its local dishes. While most of these dishes are – unsurprisingly – informed by Chinese cooking, many of them also capture Hong Kong’s east-meets-west heritage in the most delicious of ways. Whether it’s traditional Cantonese dim sum or beverages influenced by British culture, there’s something here to please all tastes.If you’re hungry to try some of these local Hong Kong dishes, here are some of the best places to do so. From wonton noodles at Mak’s Noodles to egg tarts at Tai Cheong Bakery, from seafood in Sai Kung to barbecued meats at Joy Hing, these restaurants and cafés are your best bets for an authentic taste of Hong Kong food culture.RECOMMENDED: Want to try the crème de la crème? Then be sure to check out our list of the absolute best restaurants in Hong Kong to try right now.

The best restaurants in Hong Kong you have to try
Restaurants

The best restaurants in Hong Kong you have to try

Hong Kong is a dining paradise with one of the highest ratios of restaurants per head in the world. With establishments striving to outdo each other on a daily basis in our city's fiercely competitive F&B industry, it can be hard to keep track of who's top dog at any one time. That's why we're bringing you the Time Out EAT List — an ever-changing selection of Hong Kong's hottest tables, updated on a monthly basis. From long time favourites to super newbies, we've sorted everything from restaurants in some of Hong Kong’s best hotels to the city's most delectable street eats. In short, this is whatever serves the best food in Hong Kong right now. If you've eaten something that you love on this list, share it under the hashtag #TimeOutEatList. You can also find out more about how we review restaurants and make recommendations.

The best Hong Kong cafés and coffee shops
Restaurants

The best Hong Kong cafés and coffee shops

Forget the stereotypes, Hong Kong coffee culture is about more than just showing up to work 15 minutes late with a Starbucks’ latte. Despite the popularity of traditional Hongkie drinks like lai cha and yin yang, our city is home to an increasing number of coffee connoisseurs. More and more speciality cafés are popping up around town to cater to different taste buds, and not just to cater to demand for espresso and a flat white but nitro coffee and unusual brews, too.This guide will lead you to all the best coffee shops in Hong Kong, all the way from Sheung Wan to hidden gems in Cheung Chau.

Ultimate French toast showdown
Restaurants

Ultimate French toast showdown

Much like the humble egg sandwich and char siu rice, Hong Kong-style French toast is a staple of local cuisine. The classic dish features two slices of bread deep fried and served covered in butter and syrup. But in recent years Hongkongers have been pushing new boundaries as local cha chaan tengs and restaurants have begun rolling out variations filled with the likes of custard lava, kaya spread and beef satay. We dig into four popular innovative versions to decide which gets to be crowned king.

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