Restaurants & Cafés

Your guide to dining out in Hong Kong, including restaurant reviews, new restaurants and the best restaurants in the city

The five best laksa in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The five best laksa in Hong Kong

Whether you prefer a rich curry-flavoured laksa or the hot-and-sour variety, your stomach will be happy either way at these top spots

The best local food and drink brands to try in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best local food and drink brands to try in Hong Kong

When it comes to food options in Hong Kong, we literally have the world at our fingertips. From big openings by overseas chefs to cult-favourite burger chains from the US, the city has everything to satisfy the well-travelled gourmet. At the end of the day, though, there's no taste like home, which is why we’ll always have a soft spot for brands that were born in the 852. Whether you’re hankering for an ice cream cone or baked Chinese pastry, go local and support one of these great brands.RECOMMENDED: Why not check out the best local dishes in Hong Kong, as well as the oldest restaurants in the city?

The most beautiful dim sum in Hong Kong to try right now
Restaurants

The most beautiful dim sum in Hong Kong to try right now

Dim sum is an integral part of Hong Kong dining. While we love our bamboo steamers filled with traditional siu mai and har gow, it’s also good to see more dim sum restaurants flexing their creative muscles as they transform dumplings and bite-sized morsels into stunning works of edible art. From sausage rolls dressed as candy to pastry puffs in the shape of a purse, these dim sum items will feed your Instagram as much as your stomach. By Ann Chiu and Sarah MoranRECOMMENDED: Still hungry? Check out the best dim sum places in Hong Kong, or if you’ve more of a sweet tooth, these cake shops should keep you sated.

The ultimate guide to classic Hong Kong desserts
Restaurants

The ultimate guide to classic Hong Kong desserts

In Cantonese cuisine, dessert serves as the perfect ending to a full feast or even a quick dim sum meal. And the local cuisine in Hong Kong is nothing if not varied. Here are the must-haves when you’re in town and looking to eat like a local. 

Quirky xiao long baos to try in Hong Kong right now
Restaurants

Quirky xiao long baos to try in Hong Kong right now

Whether you’ve got a sweet tooth or love numbing spice, change it up from the norm with our picks of these quirky xiao long bao in Hong Kong.

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Latest Hong Kong restaurant reviews

Popinjays
Restaurants

Popinjays

When it comes to rooftop spaces in this city, the widely accepted rule is if you've got it, flaunt it. That’s what The Murray hotel does with Popinjays, the crowning gem of its F&B portfolio. Accessible by a private elevator, the penthouse venue has a bar on one side and the restaurant on the other. It's encased in floor-to-ceiling windows with a wraparound terrace that looks out in all directions to surrounding high-rises. While the acoustics could use some improvement – right now, it's difficult to hear the staff, even if they’re standing tableside – the space is a stunner, a cool blend of class and playfulness, with plenty of Kaws artwork to embellish the walls. This showiness is apt for a restaurant that derives its name from the old-fashioned term for a parrot. Expect plenty of fowl language here, beginning with the 'aviary' cocktail selection where the Pecking Order ($130) roosts. Made with tom yum-infused Nusa Caña rum with yuzu, elderflower, lime and mint soda, it's extremely drinkable with its candy-like sourness and just a slight touch of heat. In terms of food, there's the Birds of a Feather sharing menu ($990 per person) served on Fridays and Saturdays, as well as a four or six-course degustation option ($980-$1,280) on Tuesdays to Thursdays. Deciding to fly in a different direction, we order à la carte, starting with the Hokkaido scallop and sea urchin carpaccio ($260). It's a disappointing opener, the mollusc being thick and creamy but lacking any sweetness. M

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Old Bailey
Restaurants

Old Bailey

Since opening to the public at the end of last month, Tai Kwun has been hailed as a major success for Hong Kong’s art and culture community. But aside from the exhibitions, film screenings and theatre performances hosted within its historic walls, the former Central Police Station compound has also given us something else: a score of hip and sophisticated restaurants, among which stands Old Bailey.The latest restaurant by JIA Group (also responsible for the likes of Rhoda, Duddell’s and Tai Kwun's jail-cell watering hole, Behind Bars, among others), Old Bailey boasts the kind of bright and airy roominess and stunning skyscraper views elusive to many space-starved, ground-level eateries in Soho. The 3,000sq ft space is a polished, contemporary take on mid-century modern, punctuated in the right places with tasteful pieces of furniture inspired by the Ming Dynasty. In the bar and lounge area, guests can enjoy speciality brews and cakes by Teakha throughout the day, while the main dining room serves as the backdrop for Old Bailey’s Jiangnan menu.Dishes are based on traditional recipes, such as the homemade handkerchief pasta ($148), which is inspired by a rustic village dish. More like thin, floury pancakes, this ‘pasta’ is pan-fried until chewy, golden and blistered, and coarsely chopped and served with seasonal greens – brilliantly crisp, jade-green bok choy on the night that we visit. It’s surprisingly satisfying for something so simple. Another winner is the tea smoked pigeo

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Yakiniku Jumbo
Restaurants

Yakiniku Jumbo

It’s been a busy few months for local restaurant group Global Link. After bringing Tokyo’s three-Michelin-starred Sushi Saito to our shores in March, the F&B team recently launched the first overseas outpost of Yakiniku Jumbo – a grilled meats institute with more than 30 years of history in Tokyo. Located in a prime spot close to the Central–Mid-Levels escalator, the Hong Kong venue is simple and sophisticated, dressed in blacks and natural woods in an understated manner. In this comfortable space, which seats about 50, guests can enjoy some of the finest grades of wagyu, sourced from all across Japan. The meat is flown in daily from Jumbo’s Tokyo store, chilled and never frozen, to ensure minimal changes to flavour, freshness and texture. During the early stages of its opening, Yakiniku Jumbo only offers omakase for dinner ($1,280). On the night of our visit, this nine-courser begins with a beef yukke. Made with raw meat from the inner thigh and dressed in tare, it’s a simple but thoroughly satisfying way to start the meal. We also try the wagyu nigiri, featuring a slice seared ever-so-slightly so that the fat melts into the rice below. Another highlight is the sextet of grilled wagyu rare cuts. They’re all hand-sliced by Jumbo’s experienced chefs, who ensure that every piece that makes it to the grill boasts just the right amount of marbling without being too fatty or sinewy. Every cut boasts its own distinct texture and flavour profile. The kalbi is rich while the zabuto

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Nara Thai Cuisine
Restaurants

Nara Thai Cuisine

Since its establishment in 2003 by a group of female entrepreneurs, Nara Thai has grown into a popular brand that operates six outlets in Bangkok alone. Last month, it added Hong Kong to its list of locations with an outpost in Sha Tin’s New Town Plaza. The menu is almost identical to the Bangkok locations and focuses on authentic Thai recipes that are designed to comfort. Among these is the Ayuthaya boat noodles ($98) which Nara is well-known for. This comes with an impressive array of meaty trimmings – including sliced beef, beef balls and braised beef shin, as well as deep-fried pork skin to add a welcome crunch – but the broth, which should be the soul of the dish, sadly falls flat. The broth of the tom yum glass noodles ($78) is similarly lacklustre, a tepid affair that’s neither spicy nor sweet. The soup is just as middling when ordered as a standalone tom yum kung ($108) and proves to be a disappointing backdrop to the sweet and succulent shrimp it’s served with. Of all the broth-centric dishes we try, only the rainbow soup rice noodles with fish fillet ($78) passes the grade, featuring a bright and balanced pink-coloured base that’s made by slow-cooking fish bones with red vinegar.Moving away from the brothier side of things, other offerings at Nara fare much better. We try the carpaccio-style prawns ($118), which are firm-fleshed and served with a sweet and spicy dressing that packs plenty of heat. We also recommend the soft shell crab with yellow curry ($188), which

Time Out says
2 out of 5 stars
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Cheap eats in Hong Kong

Ultimate egg sandwich showdown
Restaurants

Ultimate egg sandwich showdown

A humble egg sandwich can bring the biggest of joys. Here’s where to get the best.

All 16 McDonald’s Hong Kong burgers ranked
Restaurants

All 16 McDonald’s Hong Kong burgers ranked

What to order and what to leave for Grimace at McDonald’s in Hong Kong.

The best cheap eats in the New Territories
Restaurants

The best cheap eats in the New Territories

Our city is a gastronomic paradise, but you don’t have to spend a fortune to eat well.

The 10 best uniquely Hong Kong dishes
Restaurants

The 10 best uniquely Hong Kong dishes

The very best local specialities here in the 852.

Hong Kong’s top 10 pork chop rice dishes
Restaurants

Hong Kong’s top 10 pork chop rice dishes

We’re talking about ju paa, that beautiful combination of pork and rice.

Every Burger King burger ranked from worst to best
Restaurants

Every Burger King burger ranked from worst to best

So loosen your belt and join us as we rank every Burger King burger from worst to best.

The best restaurants in Hong Kong

The best restaurants in Tai Kok Tsui
Restaurants

The best restaurants in Tai Kok Tsui

Until recently, Tai Kok Tsui was considered something of a dead zone. Stranded in west Kowloon without an MTR station, the neighbourhood was perceived as an industrial area, like the Kwun Tong of old, with little appeal for visitors. Not any more, though. TKT is buzzing. No MTR means more affordable rent and that’s allowed a number of exciting small restaurants to establish themselves. Cantonese, Japanese omakase, Mediterranean cuisine – you can get just about anything in the neighbourhood these days. Not sure where to start? Read on for our guide to Tai Kok Tsui’s best restaurants.And if the area seems too far to go, try our guide to the best restaurants in Tai Po or North Point instead. Or simply go straight to our feature on Hong Kong’s best restaurants. By Sam Sinha

The best restaurants in Sham Shui Po
Restaurants

The best restaurants in Sham Shui Po

Sham Shui Po is home to mean cheap eats and mouthwatering street food

The best brunches in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best brunches in Hong Kong

With so many choices in Hong Kong, where do you begin?

The best food in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best food in Hong Kong

Some of our city’s must-try food and tell you where best to try it

The best restaurants in Yuen Long
Restaurants

The best restaurants in Yuen Long

Sure, the Hello Kitty Farm may have lost its license but that doesn’t mean there’s no reason to head to Yuen Long. The New Territories neighbourhood has been revitalised by the Yoho Mall (and that cinema that offers hash browns) and there’s a range of excellent restaurants to try, from cheap eats and cha chaan teng favourites to super fresh sushi and HK-style desserts. Think it’s too far for you to go? Well, if you’re looking for something a bit closer to home, why not try our guide to the best restaurants in Kennedy Town or Sham Shui Po as alternatives? By Sam Sinha

The best dim sum in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best dim sum in Hong Kong

From traditional dim sum spots, to the cheapest Michelin starred restaurants.