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Restaurants & Cafés

Your guide to dining out in Hong Kong, including restaurant reviews, new restaurants and the best restaurants in the city

New Must-Try Restaurants in November
Restaurants

New Must-Try Restaurants in November

When it comes to food, there are few places that can parallel Hong Kong’s incredibly diverse, colourful gastronomic scene. With cuisines from all around the world and no shortage of globally-renowned chefs fighting for a spot to open shop, it should come as no surprise that so many big names have their eyes set on the Pearl of the Orient. Finding new places to eat? Well, look no further because we’ve compiled all the new must-tries debuting this November! By Andrea Hui

Hong Kong’s best hotpot restaurants
Restaurants

Hong Kong’s best hotpot restaurants

Whenever the temperature drops and the weather gets chilly in our city, a good hotpot is the go-to-method to warm up. But unlike claypot rice and snake soup, which tend to be seasonal delights, Hongkongers crave hotpot all year round. From Taiwanese stinky tofu to painfully delicious spicy soup broths, follow our guide to the best and most unique hotpot spots in town.RECOMMENDED: Need to hunker down somewhere to avoid the cold? These cosy Hong Kong bars and cafés might be just what you’re looking for.

Hong Kong’s best claypot rice dishes
Restaurants

Hong Kong’s best claypot rice dishes

As the weather gets a little chilly, Hongkongers love to combat the cold weather by indulging in seasonal treats like hotpot, a steaming cup of hot chocolate and of course, claypot rice. Those in the know flock to areas like Temple Street, Sai Wan, Shau Kei Wan and Kowloon City, in a sort of winter migration, to acquire the most authentic and best claypot rice dishes. Naturally, we’re doing likewise to discover which is number one.

Best hairy crab restaurants in Hong Kong
Restaurants

Best hairy crab restaurants in Hong Kong

Postpone your medical check-up – it's officially hairy crab season. Everyone knows the allure of this crustacean delicacy is the golden roe, and dedicated crab aficionados all have their eyes on the fattest hairy crabs that burst with this 'liquid gold'. From the classic steamed hairy crabs for the purists, to innovative crab specialties, we dive deep into the season and round up the best tables serving this Chinese delicacy.  RECOMMENDED: Like your food? Well, we recommend checking out our top picks of autumn menus and best buffets in Hong Kong.

Best pumpkin dishes in Hong Kong
Restaurants

Best pumpkin dishes in Hong Kong

We're entering the season of plaid scarves, warm blankets and hot coffee. If there's one ingredient that epitomises the autumn months, it's the sweet flavours of pumpkin. Here are our picks of the restaurants, bakeries and shops around town making use of this versatile ingredient at this time of year. By Sally Gao and Sarah Moran RECOMMENDED: Find out where to spend a perfect autumn day in Hong Kong, cosy up with a cup of hot chocolate or take advantage of the cool weather and go hiking.

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Latest Hong Kong restaurant reviews

Ruam
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Ruam

The opening of Ruam on Wan Chai’s trendy Ship Street was a relatively low-key affair when compared to that of Black Sheep’s buzzy new venture, Associazione Chianti, a few weeks later and a few doors down. The latter was common of restaurants that have recently come to populate what has to be given credit as one of the most interesting epicurean alcoves in our city right now, and so the prospect of visiting one of the street’s quieter neighbours was all-the-more alluring. While certainly not proving a disappointing experience overall, the food at this self-described vibrant-casual Thai garden bar and eatery needs more attention to do the atmospheric space justice. The name of the restaurant means “to gather” in Thai, and it’s easy to discern that this was at the forefront of the minds that designed the space. Upon trundling up a narrow staircase, visitors emerge in an outdoor, deck-style space that dominates the restaurant and is replete with wooden counter-height tables seating around four – some of which offer charming views of the street below – and a couple of sprawling round tables in the centre to accommodate larger groups. Add to this atmospheric lighting, accentuated by fairy lights festooned between the wooden beams overhead, and you have a space that is inviting and conducive to conversation. The Drinking Snacks section of the menu is a good place to begin food-wise, as it’s where you’ll find a selection of starter-sized dishes including but not limited to skewers,

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Jalan
Restaurants

Jalan

The team behind popular Brazilian-Japanese fusion restaurant Uma Nota and Middle Eastern spot Bedu have succeeded again with another delicious foray into exotic cuisine, this time offering contemporary twists on Malaysian street food classics. This new venture, named Jalan — which literally translates as “street” in Malay — is located in the heart of Soho on Peel Street (two doors down, as it happens, from its big sister Uma Nota) and channels its choice of local-style cooking to delicious effect with a range of dishes that are as unique as they are fun. The restaurant’s easy-to-navigate menu is split into two sections, with the top half offering tapas-sized portions of which the waiters recommend ordering 3-4 per person, and the lower consisting of larger dishes that equate to your standard main. For those who really want to get stuck into the Jalan concept, it pays to start with a varied selection of the smaller offerings, say, the Rojak Salad ($70), which comprises a zesty mix of pineapple, carrot and cucumber tempered by earthy peanut, the JALAN “satay” style chicken ($105), which proves a well-executed take on the ubiquitous street food skewer, and the soft shell crab ($130) which is deep-fried for that winning combination of crunch and sink. Now time for the larger dishes. There were seven to choose from on my visit, and the dish that really leapt out from the menu was the coconut roasted prawn curry ($195), which was as delectable as it sounds. The dish comes in a fr

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Chatterbox Café
Restaurants

Chatterbox Café

As well as the iconic Tian Tian restaurant, Chatterbox is another one of Singapore’s hottest spots for Hainanese chicken rice. First opened at the Mandarin Orchard Hotel in 1971 and later reputed as among the nation’s premier Hainanese Chicken Rice spots, this world-renowned restaurant has recently made its first overseas debut, the Chatterbox Café, at the brand new cultural-retail destination K11 Musea in Tsim Sha Tsui. For a restaurant that encompasses over 2,000 sq. ft., the tables are a tad bit too “intimate”, but thankfully its atmosphere is enjoyably lively and relaxed enough. There’s a large mural of wildlife animals and tropical plants surrounding the dining area that evokes Singapore’s geology, and this in turn is complemented beautifully by the tasteful decor of Peranakan floor tiles.  Chatterbox Cafe’s signature dish, the Mandarin Chicken Rice ($118), sees the restaurant's renowned chicken poached in a rich broth that is made using the exact same recipe as at Chatterbox Singapore. The boneless chicken meat retains its moisture and is smooth, juicy and tender. The enticing chicken skin retains a thin layer of oil that gives it a nice sheen, yet it’s not at all greasy, boasting just the right amount of fat and gelatin underneath. The rice is as flavoursome as the meat. First cooked in chicken stock then folded gently with a small amount of chicken oil, it is fragrant and not overly cloying. Accompanying the meal is the requisite dipping sauce of ground ginger, egg y

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Duck & Waffle
Restaurants

Duck & Waffle

Renowned for its namesake duck waffle which has already been sold on over a million plates, the famed and hip London restaurant Duck & Waffle made its debut in Hong Kong by running a successful pop-up at the Ritz-Carlton three years ago, and is now coming back to open its first overseas branch at Central’s IFC Mall, dedicated to serving up its signature all-day breakfasts curated by executive chef Daniel Barbosa.  Stepping into Duck & Waffle, which boasts several eye-catching giant green ducks set in the main dining area coupled with the unique island-shaped bar design, one can immediately appreciate the place's spaciousness and convivial aura. The first thing we ordered is the classic Duck & Waffle ($230). With an oil-coated duck confit and a crispy fried duck egg placed on top of the waffle, the best way to taste it is to first remove the duck bones, poke the egg yolk, pour in the cinnamon syrup mixed with mustard seeds and cut it all the way down. As the duck is marinated two days ahead of time, slow-cooked with duck oil for ten hours, and then deep-fried for a quick finish before serving, the duck skin is exceptionally crunchy while the meat remains tender and moist, forming a rich and delightful bite with the lightly sweetened waffle. The Spiced Ox Cheek Doughnut ($135) is another signature dish of Duck & Waffle. Referencing the traditional Chinese buns, these crispy doughnuts are filled with juicy minced beef cheeks. Though a little bit spicy, we love how its greasines

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
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The best restaurants in Hong Kong

The best dim sum in Hong Kong
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The best dim sum in Hong Kong

From traditional dim sum spots, to the cheapest Michelin starred restaurants.

Hong Kong’s best street food essentials
Restaurants

Hong Kong’s best street food essentials

Hong Kong’s street food scene is known the world over. Whether you’re in Causeway Bay or Mong Kok, Tsuen Wan or Sham Shui Po, you’re bound to find some delicious streetside snacks, be it curry fishballs on a stick or fluffy eggettes in various flavours. Best of all, these tasty tidbits are usually wallet-friendly and can easily fill up your belly for just a few bucks. While our city also boasts some of the world’s best restaurants, Michelin-starred dining and other delicious eats, no Hong Kong experience is complete without sampling some – or all – of these street food favourites.RECOMMENDED: If you’re hungry and you know it, grab a slice of pizza or check out the best dim sum spots in town.

The best food in Hong Kong
Restaurants

The best food in Hong Kong

Hong Kong is a true food paradise, with some of the world’s very best restaurants, from cheap eats and street food to high-end Michelin-starred eateries. But what makes Hong Kong’s dining scene truly unique is undoubtedly its local dishes. While most of these dishes are – unsurprisingly – informed by Chinese cooking, many of them also capture Hong Kong’s east-meets-west heritage in the most delicious of ways. Whether it’s traditional Cantonese dim sum or beverages influenced by British culture, there’s something here to please all tastes.If you’re hungry to try some of these local Hong Kong dishes, here are some of the best places to do so. From wonton noodles at Mak’s Noodles to egg tarts at Tai Cheong Bakery, from seafood in Sai Kung to barbecued meats at Joy Hing, these restaurants and cafés are your best bets for an authentic taste of Hong Kong food culture.RECOMMENDED: Want to try the crème de la crème? Then be sure to check out our list of the absolute best restaurants in Hong Kong to try right now.

The best restaurants in Hong Kong you have to try
Restaurants

The best restaurants in Hong Kong you have to try

Hong Kong is a dining paradise with one of the highest ratios of restaurants per head in the world. With establishments striving to outdo each other on a daily basis in our city's fiercely competitive F&B industry, it can be hard to keep track of who's top dog at any one time. That's why we're bringing you the Time Out EAT List — an ever-changing selection of Hong Kong's hottest tables, updated on a monthly basis. From long time favourites to super newbies, we've sorted everything from restaurants in some of Hong Kong’s best hotels to the city's most delectable street eats. In short, this is whatever serves the best food in Hong Kong right now. If you've eaten something that you love on this list, share it under the hashtag #TimeOutEatList. You can also find out more about how we review restaurants and make recommendations.

The best Hong Kong cafés and coffee shops
Restaurants

The best Hong Kong cafés and coffee shops

Forget the stereotypes, Hong Kong coffee culture is about more than just showing up to work 15 minutes late with a Starbucks’ latte. Despite the popularity of traditional Hongkie drinks like lai cha and yin yang, our city is home to an increasing number of coffee connoisseurs. More and more speciality cafés are popping up around town to cater to different taste buds, and not just to cater to demand for espresso and a flat white but nitro coffee and unusual brews, too.This guide will lead you to all the best coffee shops in Hong Kong, all the way from Sheung Wan to hidden gems in Cheung Chau.

Ultimate French toast showdown
Restaurants

Ultimate French toast showdown

Much like the humble egg sandwich and char siu rice, Hong Kong-style French toast is a staple of local cuisine. The classic dish features two slices of bread deep fried and served covered in butter and syrup. But in recent years Hongkongers have been pushing new boundaries as local cha chaan tengs and restaurants have begun rolling out variations filled with the likes of custard lava, kaya spread and beef satay. We dig into four popular innovative versions to decide which gets to be crowned king.

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