The best spots for guacamole in NYC

From traditional Mexican recipes to unorthodox takes on the classic dip, here are the best spots for guacamole in NYC
Guacamole de frutas at Toloache
Photograph: Atsushi Tomioka Guacamole de frutas at Toloache
By Christina Izzo and Time Out New York contributors |
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Avocados’ superfood status and year-round availability keeps them in high-demand by Gothamites, where they can be found as avocado toast at coffee shops in NYC or whipped into the best guacamole in NYC at the city’s best Mexican restaurants. Whether as bar food to go along with your cerveza or an accompaniment to one of the best tacos in NYC, these are the best guac dips in town, from strict classics to a hefty battered fritter. 

Best guacamole in NYC

1
Rosa Mexicano
Photograph: Rosa Mexicano
Restaurants, Mexican

Rosa Mexicano

icon-location-pin Flatiron

This David Rockwell–designed Mexican restaurant has vivid terrazzo steps, a two-story blue-tile water wall and backlit pressed roses that brighten the first-floor bar. The guacamole, prepared tableside to your specifications, launched a pestle craze in New York; the stuff is still the chunky, spicy standard by which others are judged.

2
Guacamole with pistachios at Empellon Cocina
Photograph: Courtesy Empellon Cocina
Restaurants, Mexican

Empellón Cocina

icon-location-pin East Village

Alex Stupak turned heads (and strict purists) with this crunchy, textured beauty that comes with masa crisps in lieu of the garden-variety tortilla. The thick dip uses mashed Hass avocados, pistachios lightly sautéed in olive oil, minced onion, cilantro and jalapeños—with a teaspoon of the reserved nut oil drizzled over the top.

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3
Guacamole de frutas at Toloache
Photograph: Atsushi Tomioka
Restaurants, Mexican

Toloache

icon-location-pin Midtown West

It’s fitting that this Theater District spot boasting bright tiles and murals would offer a similarly colorful riff on guacamole. This fruity variation mixes Hass avocados with Vidalia onions and a basket's worth of produce like diced mangos, peaches, apples and pomegranate seeds. Balancing the sweetness are sprigs of herbaceous Thai basil, dollops of zesty habanero salsa and lime juice.

4
Cosme
Photograph: Courtesy Cosme
Restaurants, Mexican

Cosme

icon-location-pin Flatiron

You’d be hard-pressed to find missteps in Enrique Olvera’s fine-dining menu, and that thoughtful, high-brow touch extends down to lowly basics like soft corn tortillas and smooth guac. The Mexican megatoque skips lime in this pitch-perfection rendition, spicing up a traditional blend of room-temperature avocados, onions, cilantro and salt with serrano chili juice.

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5
Fonda
Restaurants, Mexican

Fonda

icon-location-pin Park Slope

Packed with locals since it opened, Fonda is a South Slope hit. The spare room is mercifully devoid of South-of-the-Border kitsch: red paint on one wall, exposed brick on the other, and a bar wrapped in multi-colored fabric. If the decor is restrained, the food—contemporary, upscale Mexican—is comparatively indulgent. Guacamole was some of the best in town: vivid, garlicky and hot with raw chiles.

6
The Black Ant
Photograph: Courtesy Yelp/Sourvione V.
Restaurants, Mexican

The Black Ant

icon-location-pin East Village

This low-lit, monochrome East Village cantina, from Ofrenda amigos Jorge Guzman and Mario Hernandez, busts out of the tortilla-wrapped norm, spotlighting tribal delicacies like grasshoppers, worms and, yes, the namesake ant.The latter is turned into a salt to season the house guacamole, which comes flavored with chipotle, garbanzos and cilantro.

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7
ABAJO fried guacamole
Paul Wagtouicz
Bars, Cocktail bars

Abajo

icon-location-pin Tribeca

Beneath Angelo Sosa’s Tribeca taqueria Añejo, find a subterranean booze den slinging tequila, mescal and these gut-sticking fritters nestling the tried-and-true avocado, cilantro and onion blend in a turmeric-infused batter shell.

8
Guacamole at Rosie's
Photograph: Sasithon Pooviriyakul
Restaurants, Mexican

Rosie’s

icon-location-pin East Village

At his East Village eatery, chef Marc Meyer whips up an unfussed take on guacamole, with chopped onions and cilantro folded into the smashed avocado base and a crown of julienned white radishes on top.

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