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Things to do on a Sunday in New York

Have fun like there’s no tomorrow with the best things to do on a Sunday in New York including events, brunch and more.

Written by
Time Out New York editors
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Forget about work in the morning: you’ve got too much partying to do today, so here are the best things to do on a Sunday in New York. Whether you’re planning a day trip from NYC, looking for an awesome festival, or finally have the time to see some of the best museum exhibitions in NYC, we’ve got the rundown for your best Sunday Funday right here. And if you blew all your cash on Saturday, stick with our picks for the best free things to do in town.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to things to do in NYC this weekend and on Saturday

Things to do on any Sunday

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Drama
  • price 4 of 4
  • Midtown West
Broadway review by Adam Feldman  Reducio! After 18 months, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child has returned to Broadway in a dramatically new form. As though it had cast a Shrinking Charm on itself, the formerly two-part epic is now a single show, albeit a long one: Almost three and a half hours of stage wizardry, set 20 years after the end of J.K. Rowling’s seven-part book series and tied to a complicated time-travel plot about the sons of Harry Potter and his childhood foe Draco Malfoy. (See below for a full review of the 2018 production.) Audiences who were put off by the previous version’s tricky schedule and double price should catch the magic now.  Despite its shrinking, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child has kept most of its charm. The spectacular set pieces of John Tiffany’s production remain—the staircase ballet, the underwater swimming scene, the gorgeous flying wraiths—but about a third of the former text has been excised. Some of the changes are surgical trims, and others are more substantial. The older characters take the brunt of the cuts (Harry’s flashback nightmares, for example, are completely gone); there is less texture to the conflicts between the fathers and sons, and the plotting sometimes feels more rushed than before. But the changes have the salutary effect of focusing the story on its most interesting new creations: the resentful Albus Potter (James Romney) and the unpopular Scorpius Malfoy (Brady Dalton Richards), whose bond has been reconceived in a s
Hamilton
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 4 of 4
  • Midtown West
Hamilton: Theater review by David Cote What is left to say? After Founding Father Alexander Hamilton’s prodigious quill scratched out 12 volumes of nation-building fiscal and military policy; after Lin-Manuel Miranda turned that titanic achievement (via Ron Chernow’s 2004 biography) into the greatest American musical in decades; after every critic in town (including me) praised the Public Theater world premiere to high heaven; and after seeing this language-drunk, rhyme-crazy dynamo a second time, I can only marvel: We've used up all the damn words. Wait, here are three stragglers, straight from the heart: I love Hamilton. I love it like I love New York, or Broadway when it gets it right. And this is so right. A sublime conjunction of radio-ready hip-hop (as well as R&B, Britpop and trad showstoppers), under-dramatized American history and Miranda’s uniquely personal focus as a first-generation Puerto Rican and inexhaustible wordsmith, Hamilton hits multilevel culture buttons, hard. No wonder the show was anointed a sensation before even opening. Assuming you don’t know the basics, ­Hamilton is a (mostly) rapped-through biomusical about an orphan immigrant from the Caribbean who came to New York, served as secretary to General Washington, fought against the redcoats, authored most of the Federalist Papers defending the Constitution, founded the Treasury and the New York Post and even made time for an extramarital affair that he damage-controlled in a scandal-stanching pamphle
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  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 3 of 4
  • Midtown West
Broadway review by Adam Feldman A Strange Loop is a wild ride. In a Broadway landscape dominated by shows that often seem designed by corporations for audiences of focus groups, Michael R. Jackson’s musical is the defiant product of a single and singular authorial vision. This wide-ranging intravaganza takes a deep dive, often barely coming up for breath, into a whirlpool of ambition and frustration as Jackson's seeming alter ego—a queer, Black writer-composer named Usher (Jaquel Spivey)—struggles to define himself amid traps of sex, race, family, body image, religion and entertainment. It’s screamingly funny and howlingly hurt, and it’s unmissable.   Smartly directed by Stephen Brackett, the show caused a sensation in 2019 when it premiered at Playwrights Horizons; now, after multiple top-ten lists and an armful of honors (including the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and a New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award), it has reached Broadway without compromising its conflicted, challenging, sometimes actively family-unfriendly content. The songs are welcomingly tuneful and clever, but as Usher warns us in the opening number: “A Strange Loop will have Black shit! And white shit! It’ll give you uptown and downtown! With truth-telling and butt-fucking!”  All of that is true—including, graphically, the last part—but it barely begins to describe the show’s discombobulating melange of anger, joy, neurosis and honesty. In this very meta musical, Usher is the only real character: the unstable “I
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 4 of 4
  • Midtown West
If theater is your religion and the Broadway musical your sect, you've been woefully faith-challenged of late. Venturesome, boundary-pushing works such as Spring Awakening, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson and Next to Normal closed too soon. American Idiot was shamefully ignored at the Tonys and will be gone in three weeks. Meanwhile, that airborne infection Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark dominates headlines and rakes in millions, without even opening. Celebrities and corporate brands sell poor material, innovation gets shown the door, and crap floats to the top. It's enough to turn you heretic, to sing along with The Book of Mormon's Ugandan villagers: "Fuck you God in the ass, mouth and cunt-a, fuck you in the eye." Such deeply penetrating lyrics offer a smidgen of the manifold scato-theological joys to be had at this viciously hilarious treat crafted by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, of South Park fame, and composer-lyricist Robert Lopez, who cowrote Avenue Q. As you laugh your head off at perky Latter-day Saints tap-dancing while fiercely repressing gay tendencies deep in the African bush, you will be transported back ten years, when The Producers and Urinetown resurrected American musical comedy, imbuing time-tested conventions with metatheatrical irreverence and a healthy dose of bad-taste humor. Brimming with cheerful obscenity, sharp satire and catchy tunes, The Book of Mormon is a sick mystic revelation, the most exuberantly entertaining Broadway musical in years. The high q
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  • Things to do
  • price 1 of 4
  • Coney Island
One of the last of its kind, this ten-act extravaganza of human oddities aims to satisfy nostalgic and progressive temperaments alike. Finally returning after a year of closure, the iconic spectacle adds a footnote to the controversial freak-show conversation by celebrating the talents of those “born different.” The lineup includes contortionists, sword swallowers, fire eaters and escape artists.
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • price 3 of 4
  • Chelsea
Theater review by Raven Snook Set in the waiting room of a skin-cancer treatment facility in 2019, Gracie Gardner's high-risk dark comedy I'm Revolting examines a group of patients facing unsettling procedures with unhelpful caretakers in tow. For these nervous people, excising malignant growths may be easier than cutting toxic relatives out of their lives. Nineteen-year-old Reggie (a sympathetic Alicia Pilgrim), estranged from her parents because she's gay, tries to lean on big sis Anna (Gabby Beans, a whirlwind of narcissism), who's usually too busy brokering financial deals via Bluetooth. Hipster Toby (Patrick Vaill, a bundle of nerves) is saddled with New Age-y mother Paula (the bitch-perfect Laura Esterman) who thinks singing bowls and plenty of blame will help. Schoolteacher Liane (Emily Cass McDonnell, in an underwritten role) has a feckless husband (Glenn Fitzgerald) and a disfiguring diagnosis. Only septuagenarian Clyde (Peter Gerety), a clinic frequent flyer, is in good spirits, perhaps because he's on his own. Gardner, who works as an EMT in Brooklyn, has an uncanny ear for dialogue. She prizes people over plot as she fleshes out her characters, mining their flaws for punch lines and pathos. Through their uneasy conversations, she's also able to organically reveal the devastating personal impact of larger social issues: the dangers of for-profit medicine, unequal health care, science denial, overworked physicians and lack of informed consent. (The doctors, played b
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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 3 of 4
  • Hell's Kitchen
Theater review by Adam Feldman  [Note: Rob McClure currently plays the role of Seymour and and Andrew Call plays Orin. Lena Hall takes over as Audrey on September 6; Brad Oscar and Bryce Pinkham step into the roles of Mushnik and Orin, respectively, on September 27.]  Little Shop of Horrors is a weird and adorable show with teeth. Based on Roger Corman’s shlocky 1960 film, Howard Ashman and Alan Menken’s 1982 musical tells the Faustian story of a dirt-poor schlub named Seymour (Jonathan Groff), a lowly petal pusher at a Skid Row flower shop, who cultivates a relationship with a most unusual plant. What seems at first a blessing—a way for the lonely Seymour to earn money and to get closer to his boss, Mushnik (Tom Alan Robbins), and his used and bruised coworker, Audrey (Tammy Blanchard)—soon turns sinister. The plant, whom he names Audrey II (designed by Nicholas Mahon and voiced by Kingsley Leggs), requires human blood to grow, and Seymour doesn’t have enough of his own to spare. He doesn’t want to feed the beast, but he can’t resist the lure of the green. Arguably the best musical ever adapted from a movie, Little Shop does for B flicks what Sweeney Todd does for Grand Guignol. Librettist Ashman and composer Menken—who, between this show and their Disney animated films, did more than anyone to return musical theater from its mass-culture exile in the late 20th century—brilliantly wrap a sordid tale of capitalist temptation and moral decay in layers of sweetness, humor, wit
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Drama
  • price 3 of 4
  • Midtown West
Broadway review by Adam Feldman It is a curious yet somehow apt feature of the English language that the words caretaker and caregiver mean roughly the same thing. The fraught give-and-take involved in caring for—and about—other people is the central concern of Martyna Majok’s painfully humane drama Cost of Living, which juxtaposes a pair of stories about tending to the severely disabled. But physical ability is just one of the dividing lines in a play that is equally concerned with financial and emotional reliance. For Jess (the vivid Kara Young), at least at first, the arrangement is purely professional: Already exhausted from juggling multiple jobs, she is hired by a wealthy and supercilious Princeton grad student, John (Gregg Mozgala), to help him bathe, dress and otherwise navigate the challenges of his cerebral palsy. For Eddie (David Zayas), an unemployed former truck driver, the stakes are more personal. When his estranged wife, Ani (a superbly caustic Katy Sullivan), is rendered quadriplegic by a car accident—losing the use of all but a few fingers on one hand—he leaps at the chance for a rapprochement, however resistant she may be to the notion. Majok came to the U.S. from Poland as a child, and her plays (which also include Ironbound and Sanctuary City) are alert to the economic realities of working-class immigrant life. As its title implies, Cost of Living is very much about the ways in which material circumstances shape our choices, especially within the crazy-ma
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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 3 of 4
  • Midtown West
Theater review by Adam Feldman  Here’s my advice: Go to hell. And by hell, of course, I mean Hadestown, Anaïs Mitchell’s fizzy, moody, thrilling new Broadway musical. Ostensibly, at least, the show is a modern retelling of the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice: Boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy goes to the land of the dead in hopes of retrieving girl, boy loses girl again. “It’s an old song,” sings our narrator, the messenger god Hermes (André De Shields, a master of arch razzle-dazzle). “And we’re gonna sing it again.” But it’s the newness of Mitchell’s musical account—and Rachel Chavkin’s gracefully dynamic staging—that bring this old story to quivering life. In a New Orleans–style bar, hardened waif Eurydice (Eva Noblezada) falls for Orpheus (Reeve Carney), a busboy with an otherworldly high-tenor voice who is working, like Roger in Rent, toward writing one perfect song. But dreams don’t pay the bills, so the desperate Eurydice—taunted by the Fates in three-part jazz harmony—opts to sell her soul to the underworld overlord Hades (Patrick Page, intoning jaded come-ons in his unique sub-sepulchral growl, like a malevolent Leonard Cohen). Soon she is forced, by contract, into the ranks of the leather-clad grunts of Hades’s filthy factory city; if not actually dead, she is “dead to the world anyway.” This Hades is a drawling capitalist patriarch who keeps his minions loyal by giving them the minimum they need to survive. (“The enemy is poverty,” he sings to them in
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • price 3 of 4
  • Midtown West
Broadway review by Adam Feldman Who doesn’t enjoy a royal wedding? The zingy Broadway musical Six celebrates, in boisterous fashion, the union of English dynastic history and modern pop music. On a mock concert stage, backed by an all-female band, the six wives of the 16th-century monarch Henry VIII air their grievances in song, and most of them have plenty to complain about: two were beheaded, two were divorced, one died soon after childbirth. In this self-described “histo-remix,” members of the long-suffering sextet spin their pain into bops; the queens sing their heads off and the audience loses its mind.  That may be for the best, because Six is not a show that bears too much thinking about. Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss wrote it when they were still students at Cambridge University, and it has the feel of a very entertaining senior showcase. Its 80 minutes are stuffed with clever turns of rhyme and catchy pastiche melodies that let mega-voiced singers toss off impressive “riffs to ruffle your ruffs.” The show's own riffs on history are educational, too, like a cheeky new British edition of Schoolhouse Rock. If all these hors d’oeuvres don’t quite add up to a meal, they are undeniably tasty. Aside from the opening number and finale and one detour into Sprockets–style German club dancing, Six is devoted to giving each of the queens—let’s call them the Slice Girls—one moment apiece in the spotlight, decked out in glittering jewel-encrusted outfits by Gabriella Slade that are Tu

Concerts to see this Sunday

  • Music
  • DUMBO

Dance the afternoon away with Latin Mix Sundays, featuring Ronnie Roc & DJ Torres every Sunday from 1 to 4pm. Special drinks will be available at the Time Out Market Bar to cool you down and spice things up between noon and 5pm, including specials like the Rum Punch Pouch ($12), the Very Berry Sangria ($12) and Modelo Drafts ($6). With great music and tasty drinks, there’s no reason not to come hang out with us!

Looking for the perfect Sunday brunch?

The best brunch in NYC
  • Restaurants

Consult our comprehensive guide to the best brunch NYC has to offer and enjoy the perfect late breakfast this weekend

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