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Charcoal octopus at Anason
Photograph: Alana Dimou

The best Turkish restaurants in Sydney

Whether you're after fragrant and spiced kofta or fluffy tombik bread, Sydney's got it all

Written by
Elizabeth McDonald
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With fragrant, rose-scented desserts, warm spiced kofta and smoky grilled skewers of tender meat, Turkish cuisine is far more than just a late-night kebab or a sad tub of hummus at a backyard party.

A huge wave of new Turkish restaurants have been taking over Sydney in recent years, and frankly, we're thrilled with the regional and specific dishes to discover as well as the classics that know no borders. 

To make life easy, we've rounded up the best of the best so you can get your fix any time.

Can't get enough of Sydney's finest? Check out our picks for the best new restaurants in town here.

The best Turkish restaurants in Sydney

It should come as no surprise that the Efendy group features so frequently on lists of the best Turkish in Sydney. After all, the casual fine diners have brought astonishing quality and attention to detail across the board, to delicious effect.

Maydanoz is worth the visit for aesthetics alone, with tumbling heirloom pumpkins on display and gorgeous verdent subway tiles across the entire space. The only thing better is the food.

  • Restaurants
  • Turkish
  • Potts Point

Izgara is a luxe ocakbasi-style eatery in the revitalised Potts Point. Ocakbasi, which roughly translates to "stand by the grill", leaves little to the imagination, with everything getting a lick from the massive grills that dominate the kitchen, from which diners are served directly by the chefs. The meat-heavy menu includes thinly sliced lamb belly on smoked eggplants, as well as a yoghurt-based kebab with shredded lamb shoulder and foamy butter known as Iskender.

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Anason
  • Restaurants
  • Barangaroo

Barangaroo’s quest to become Sydney’s next dining hub continues with the opening of Anason. In keeping with its location, Anason’s menu dips into the sea while giving a nod to the meyhanes of Istanbul. We’re excited about the charcoal octopus leg with mastic and couscous, and the lamb short fillet with beğendi, a cold eggplant dish with tomatoes. Those passing through can grab a heart-starting Turkish coffee and a simit, a sesame-covered Turkish-style pretzel, all served from the restaurant’s outdoor cart.

  • Restaurants
  • Sydney

A wave of exceptional restaurants has come to 25 Martin Place, the revamped dining precinct that joins a slew of culinary quarters to hit Sydney. Riding this wave is Aalia, a beautiful venture from beloved and deservedly celebrated Nour. While Aalia's Surry Hills sister might focus on Lebanese cuisine (as diverse and eclectic as that is), what sets the stunningly plush Aalia apart is that it's a veritable field trip across the whole of the Middle East, including a jaunt across the coast of North Africa.

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  • Restaurants
  • Turkish
  • Barangaroo

This 45-seater kebab joint is serving up Istanbul-style street food of smoky grilled meats, pilav ustu (cracked bulgar wheat with thinly shaved beef) and the restaurant's namesake: light-as-a-feather wood-fired tombik bread. Tombik is inspired by the cosy bars dotted around Taksim in Turkey, as well as traditional doner kebab stands that surround them. Expect exceptional attention to detail in dishes like the marbled Wagyu grilled over coals, house-made tahini and chilli sauce, and rare wines from Turkey and around the globe. There is, of course, a killer cocktail list of herbaceous and refreshing brews, like the turnip and chilli-spiked turshu (a sweet pickle), served with aniseed-heavy raki.

  • Restaurants
  • Turkish
  • Crows Nest

Turkish for breakfast may not be the first thing that comes to many minds, but Turka on the North Shore is proving that this diverse and delicious cuisine can truly be an all-day affair. Felafel bowls with hummus, poached eggs and dry-cured pastirma are a strong way to start the day. At night, meze platters are served to the masses of locals and those who travel alike.

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