1. シオ
    シオ
  2. Ao
  3. Uogashi Nihonichi Shibuya Dogenzaka
    Photo: Uogashi Nihon-ichi Shibuya Dogenzaka
  4. Yamawarau

Best restaurants in Shibuya

From sushi to yakitori and gyoza, here are the best places to eat in Shibuya, including the neighbourhoods of Daikanyama, Harajuku and Yoyogi

Written by
Time Out Tokyo Editors
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Tokyo is the world's best food city, and we have the Michelin stars to prove it. But there are many, many other restaurants worth visiting besides those bestowed with a star, or three. So we have put together a list to make it easier for you to hunt down an exemplary restaurant – if you're in Shibuya. We've expanded our search beyond the immediate surroundings of the iconic scramble crossing and ventured into the adjacent neighbourhoods of Daikanyama, Harajuku and Yoyogi, which are within the Shibuya ward.

Whether you're looking for an elaborate kaiseki meal that celebrates the season, a hearty yakitori meal paired with natural wines, progressive Japanese-French cuisine, or even an updated take on the local fast food staple gyoza, start eating through this list. Oh, and we have included a vegetarian restaurant in here too, one that would wow even the meat-lovers. 

RECOMMENDED: The 100 best restaurants in Tokyo you have to try 

Within 1km of Shibuya Station

  • Restaurants
  • Ramen
  • Shibuya

This Udagawacho hotspot uses a rich, delicious gyokai tonkotsu broth made from simmering chicken, pork and seafood. The rich light-brown soup is packed with flavour and pairs well with the straight and firm noodles. The basic ramen starts at just ¥800, but for ¥1,200 you’ll get a bowl with all the trimmings including lightly seared chashu pork, menma bamboo shoots, a flavoured egg and green onions. To give your ramen an extra kick, we recommend adding a bit of yuzu or kuro shichimi seasoning powder to the bowl...

Kiraku
  • Restaurants
  • Ramen
  • Shibuya
  • price 1 of 4

Experience matters – and Kiraku has it in spades. This 68-year-old ramen shop has been serving up Tokyo-style noodles since 1952. The simple-but-delicious Taiwan ramen is worth a try, but first-timers should start with the classic chukamen (¥700). The soy sauce-based broth is packed with fried onions and chewy, flat noodles, and is topped with fresh bean sprouts, nitamago (slow-boiled egg) and the obligatory chashu pork slices – just the way they used to make it everywhere in Tokyo...

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  • Restaurants
  • Shibuya

You can travel Japan in its entirety through your taste buds at this speciality restaurant in Shibuya Hikarie. The restaurant’s comprehensive menu features food and drink items from all 47 prefectures; some of the ingredients used are also put up for sale. The eatery is part of the D47 venture at Hikarie where it joins a retail space and museum featuring items from across Japan.You’ll want to check back frequently as the menu changes each month.

  • Restaurants
  • Sushi
  • Shibuya

Looking for an omakase sushi meal that won’t break the bank? Edo-style sushi specialist Sushi Tokyo Ten, located in the super central Shibuya Stream complex, has one of the best deals in town. Don’t be put off by its classy décor; dinner omakase is just ¥7,000 a person and you’ll be treated to more than your fair share of seasonal fish plus plenty of additional items including side dishes and miso soup. The lunch set is an even bigger steal, coming in at just ¥3,500 a person.

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Sagatani
  • Restaurants
  • Shibuya
  • price 1 of 4

This soba shop offers quality food at rock-bottom prices – everything is well under ¥1,000. Simply order your soba at the vending machine up front and you’ll be served in a matter of minutes. Sagatani doesn’t skimp on quality: they make their own soba with buckwheat that’s ground up at the front of the restaurant. You can also add on toppings such as fried chicken, tororo grated yam and even eggplant tempura. With prices this low, you might as well pile it on.

  • Restaurants
  • Shibuya
  • price 1 of 4

Visiting a standing sushi bar is a must while you’re in Tokyo and Uogashi Nihon-Ichi is one of the best around. You’ll find this chain eatery in a few areas around Tokyo, including its newly reopened outlet in Shibuya Dogenzaka. The best part about visiting this joint is watching the sushi chefs up close as they whip up your order at lightning speed. There’s an English menu – or you can just point to the seafood you recognise at the counter. Apart from Dogenzaka, there are branches all over town, including in Kyobashi, Akihabara, Kojimachi, Kichijoji, Asakusabashi and Akasaka.

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Gyoza Bar Comme a Paris
  • Restaurants
  • Fusion
  • Shibuya
  • price 1 of 4

For most gyoza fans, the dumplings are meant to be washed down with beer – but the good folks at this hip Aoyama joint are going against the grain, and pairing theirs with wine. Both their meat and vegetable gyoza are made without any garlic, which apparently makes them supremely vino-friendly. Excellent homemade sauces with flavours such as Provence herb and white miso add to the French fusion feel, while dishes such as ‘onion gratin gyoza’ further blur the culinary borders...

Nagi Shokudo
  • Restaurants
  • Daikanyama

Shibuya's best vegetarian restaurant is also one of the trickiest to find, tucked away on an obscure back street five minutes' walk south of the station. Nagi Shokudo is busiest at lunch, when diners pay ¥1,000 for a generous set including rice, miso, a drink and three dishes from the deli counter (all of which are actually vegan, though they don't make a big deal about it). At dinner, you can order à la carte or get the evening's plate combo, which might be Thai, Indian or Japanese-style, depending on when you go...

Other Shibuya neighbourhoods

Ao
  • Restaurants
  • Yoyogi-Uehara

There’s a lot to love about Ao. For starters, it manages to combine the casual vibe of an izakaya with the thoughtfulness of kaiseki cuisine. Don’t get us wrong – it’s never rowdy. Instead, it’s an unassuming little neighbourhood restaurant whose cosy, homely atmosphere belies its modern yet relaxed approach to Japanese food. It’s hard to pinpoint an overarching concept guiding the food, except that it’s based on fresh, seasonal Japanese ingredients, interpreted through techniques from other cuisines.

What’s really surprising is that the menu is priced at only ¥3,400, which makes the restaurant even more endearing. For honest good food that's unpretentious and thoroughly enjoyable, this is quite possibly one of the best deals in town. The best part is, Ao closes only at 2am, meaning you can eat well when most restaurants have shuttered for the night...

Yamawarau
  • Restaurants
  • Harajuku

Having debuted here in Omotesando and now with branches in Ginza and Shibuya, Yamawarau is tailored to make solo shabu-shabu a comfortable experience (groups are welcome too). The restaurant actually goes beyond mere comfort. A sleek interior design features muted tones inspired by mingei folk crafts, with seating around a spot-lit oval counter made from natural wood and featuring single-serving, artisan-crafted nabe pots. Equal care goes into the sourcing of meats and vegetables (the black sirloin is a highlight), with both lunch and dinner courses on offer (from ¥1,450 and ¥2,900 respectively), plus a la carte options in the evening.

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  • Restaurants
  • Bistros
  • Harajuku
  • price 2 of 4

Hidden away in a quiet back alley just steps from the hustle and bustle of Harajuku lies Kiki, the domain of haute cuisine wizard Yuki Noda. Noda had worked at venerable Paris establishment Taillevent before returning to Japan to take up the sous chef position under Christophe Paucod at Kagurazaka’s Lugdunum Bouchon Lyonnais. He went independent in 2011, leaving behind the hallowed halls of Michelin-starred restaurants in favour of a more casual setting in the form of Kiki.

Hoping to attract a young clientele with reasonably priced four-course lunch and five-course dinner, he is particularly fond of seasonal fruit and berries. Relying exclusively on Japanese ingredients, he believes that French cuisine on these shores should aim to reveal the ‘non-Japanese side’ of domestic produce.

  • Restaurants
  • Hiroo

One of the best Chinese restaurants in Shibuya, Jasmine specialises in the spicy Chinese cuisine from the Szechuan province. While the dishes are executed with the flair and refinement befitting the restaurant’s simple elegant setting, the flavours are spot on: bold and punchy, and they leave a mild tingling sensation at the back of your palate.

Dinner costs upwards of ¥4,000; the weekday lunch menu, however, is a steal in comparison. The rice sets are priced at ¥1,100, and they each come with a main, rice, soup, side dish and dessert. Plus you get to add on a small serving of the restaurant’s signature mapo tofu for a mere ¥250 – and you should...

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  • Restaurants
  • Harajuku

The latest addition to the Gonpachi family, this Harajuku outpost focuses on temaki, or hand rolls, which are all made to order. The menu consists of some firm favourites such as salmon avocado and tuna, but also branches out into typical Japanese combinations including yam and cod roe, okra and natto, and stewed beef. All of them come with a salad leaf inside to keep the nori seaweed from getting soggy too quickly. To add an extra twist, just over half of the rolls can be had with 'cauliflower rice' instead: a mix of avocado and cauliflower, which substitutes the regular sushi rice and gives the entire thing a suspiciously healthy feel...

  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Harajuku
  • price 3 of 4

A few factors separate Florilège from the competition. There’s the dramatic setting: the counters and walls are the colours of ash and charcoal, the carpets lava red, and the plants in the open kitchen seem startlingly green. Kawate and his fleet-footed colleagues work quietly under spotlights; it’s thrilling to observe them up close.

While Florilège is often described as ‘French-Japanese fusion’, Kawate says he doesn’t separate the two cuisines in his mind. He’s worked in both countries and wants to develop his own style without worrying too much about labels. His menu, which changes every two months, features dishes which echo the décor with radiantly bright ingredients contrasted against earthy crockery: a beef consommé with aged meat and smoked potato is a highlight, while we also love the sardines served with noodles and sundried tomatoes.

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  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Yoyogi-Uehara
  • price 2 of 4

Chef Shusaku Toba has transformed his popular Yoyogi-Uehara restaurant Gris into a new restaurant Sio, where he teams up with young chefs and sommeliers to deliver an incredible fusion of Japanese and French cuisines. His signature dish, foie gras mousse and macaron, is still part of the ten courses meal, along with a protein main and other dishes championing seasonal produce. If you're not a wine drinker, the restaurant also has a tea pairing option where a variety of Chinese tea is served alongside each dish...

  • Restaurants
  • Bistros
  • Yoyogi-Hachiman
  • price 2 of 4

Having brought a puff pastry-powered bromance to its logical conclusion, chef Taichi Hara and pâtissier Yuichi Goto teamed up to open Path and the duo’s bistro-café has already become a sensation in Shibuya’s Tomigaya. Path serves breakfast and brunch – including their famous, super-fluffy dutch pancake – from 8am to 2pm. Get there early to secure a seat and wait around 30 minutes for this oven-baked delicacy, topped with uncured ham, burrata and copious amounts of maple syrup.

At night, you get to pick from natural wines, Kyoto-made craft beer and rare liqueurs to complement the beautifully plated Italian cuisine, all in a delightfully laidback atmosphere.

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Sekihotei
  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Harajuku
  • price 4 of 4

A meal prepared by Shinichi Akatsuka is a rare treat. The bespectacled, softly spoken chef is one of the city’s finest practitioners of kaiseki – Japanese haute cuisine with a focus on artful, seasonal, ceremonial and perfectly balanced food. His tranquil Gaienmae restaurant, which opened 12 years ago and now boasts two Michelin stars, offers the ideal setting for such beautiful fare – there are four elegant private rooms as well as counter seating facing a quiet garden.

Chef Akatsuka is considered something of a genius when it comes to harmoniously combining seasonal ingredients from around Japan, with an emphasis on fresh fish and other seafood. He’s also a magician with ingredients such as bonito flakes and matsutake mushrooms. Such craftsmanship, unsurprisingly, comes at a price (omakase deals start from ¥16,000 at dinner, drinks not included). It’s worth every yen, of course, because this is among the most exquisite of kaiseki experiences in Tokyo.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Hiroo
  • price 1 of 4

From the outside, Asano looks like any old house – but what happens behind the heavy door is something out of the ordinary. Serving up homely Kyoto-style obanzai and oden, chef Asano prepares eight to ten varieties for you to choose from, including tamagoyaki omelette and vegetables boiled in a flavourful broth. Unlike the usual Tokyo-style fare with its brown katsuobushi-based soup, Asano's oden swims in a clear, sardine- and chicken-based broth. One dish not to be missed is rice with dried young sardines and sansho pepper, served with a starchy egg soup. It's simple, healthy and delicious.

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  • Restaurants
  • Yakitori
  • Harajuku
  • price 2 of 4

If you're ready to try the refined side of grilled chicken skewers, then enter Yakitori Imai just off Gaien Nishi-dori north of Aoyama. Owner and grill master Takashi Imai opened his stylish thirty-seat, counter-style joint in November 2016 and has been reinventing skewered chicken through his considered approach ever since.

Imai's philosophy is reflected in the dinner menu: it starts with a delicate chicken liver pate served on a crusty baguette before moving on to a leafy seasonal salad, the chef’s selection of six skewers and then grilled vegetables of the day. You can opt for craft beer to wash down your chicken morsels, but a more interesting approach is going with the small but well-curated selection of natural wine by the bottle or glass.

Les Chanterelles
  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Yoyogi-Hachiman
  • price 2 of 4

Yusuke Nakada sure loves mushrooms. They inspired the name of the chef’s Yoyogi-Hachiman restaurant, and appear in most of the dishes. Nakada used to work in a rural French restaurant famed for its creative use of fungi and the experience clearly left its mark – this is brilliantly inventive cooking which showcases the incredible versatility of several domestic and imported mushroom varieties.

Don’t miss his inspired pairing of mushroom tea and an intensely opulent foie gras macaroon, or his signature smoked salmon, exquisitely combined with boiled aubergine and roquefort sauce. There’s no menu, but there’s no need to worry. Chef Nakada sees himself as a culinary consultant and will create special meals just for you.

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  • Restaurants
  • Italian
  • Daikanyama
  • price 2 of 4

Falò is a smart, hip space with an izakaya-like vibe, and the Italian cooking is unique and often brilliant. Under an uneven chipboard ceiling, Kashimura and his team prepare meat and pasta dishes in full view of the counter-seated customers – and to a rousing ’80s rock soundtrack.

The restaurant is Kashimura’s attempt to create a casual Italian dining experience aimed at Japanese guests. He’s hitting this target with ease, aided by excellent pasta dishes and his knack for beautiful presentation...

  • Restaurants
  • Burgers
  • Daikanyama
  • price 1 of 4

There are only three food items on Henry’s Burger’s menu: hamburger (¥860), double hamburger (¥1,180) and fries (¥270). This is a good thing. Henry’s Burger, named after the owner, benefits from a less-is-more approach. The focus is on the natural flavour of the wagyu, which is pounded on the grill before being topped with sliced cheddar that melts into the patty seconds after hitting the grill.

There’s a slice of tomato, a leaf of lettuce, a slather of thousand island dressing, and a custom-made bun that holds the contents in place without overshadowing the beef, the star of the show. Henry’s handheld feasts are designed to be eaten on the go, and accordingly there are only four seats. It’s a popular joint so if you do plan to eat in, be prepared to queue.

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