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London Wetland Centre
Photograph: London Wetland Centre

Things to do in London this weekend

Make the most of the weekend by getting stuck into the best things going on this Friday, Saturday and Sunday

By Time Out London Things To Do, Alexandra Sims and Katie McCabe
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It’s cold, it’s dark, Tier 2 is in full force, but there is one thing 2020 won’t take away from us, and that’s a Halloween weekend good enough to make you scream.

Yep, spooky season is here and despite the new lockdown restrictions and a 10pm curfew for bars and restaurants, events and things to do are still in good supply. There’s still time to comb out your wing and rinse out your fangs ready for the slew of Halloween parties and events that are still taking place this weekend.

If spooks aren’t your style, see some outdoor art at an exhibition taking place in the reedbeds of the London Wetlands Centre or join Notting Hill Carnival favourites Channel One for another of their Sunday socials at Brixton Courtyard. Staying in? Let your virtual hair down by tuning into a bunch of free films at the online Raindance Film Festival or watching the Royal Ballet back on the stage at the Royal Opera House.

It’s also the season of London’s new big autumn shows and theatre. Follow our guide to make the most of this weekend. 

RECOMMENDED: Find more London events you can stream online now.

What’s on this weekend?

Natural History Museum
Natural History Museum
Photograph: The Trustees of the Natural History Museum

Halloween in London

Things to do

When we’ve started walking into spider webs again and the supermarkets are full of pumpkin-related merchandise, it can only mean one thing: Halloween is almost upon us. Spooky season is set to be pretty different from what we’re used to.  But, there’ll still be a chance to rinse out your vampire fangs and hone your prosthetic-application skills, because London’s ever-resourceful event planners and venues are still hoping to make us scream. 

Drag Kids, Tell Tale Productions, Raindance Film Festival
Drag Kids, Tell Tale Productions, Raindance Film Festival
Photograph: ‘Drag Kids‘/ Tell Tale Productions

Raindance Film Festival

Film Online, London

The UK’s biggest indie film festival is ripping up the rule book this year. Whose rule book? We don’t know. Whoever decides how film fests are run – probably someone who lives beneath the BFI. Anyway, for 2020 it’s taking all its screenings online and making them available FOR FREE, which means, despite all the uncertainty facing the cinema industry at the moment, indie film will be more accessible than ever. As long as you’ve got a broadband connection you can watch big premieres, like the David Bowie biopic ‘Stardust’, Megan Wennberg’s moving documentary ‘Drag Kids’ and dozens of feature debuts. Being an insufferable film buff has never been so easy.

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Film Africa
Film Africa
Photograph: ‘You will die at 20’/Film Africa

Film Africa

Things to do Film events Various London venues, London

Back for the ninth year, and here to give London’s cinema scene a much-needed boost, is Film Africa: the capital’s biggest celebration of African and African diaspora film. Mixing feature-length premieres, shorts and documentaries, the fest will show 46 films from 14 African countries in socially-distanced screenings at BFI Southbank and Rich Mix, and, for the first time, via BFI Player (yes, that means you can watch exclusive films from the sofa in your PJs).  

Mariah and Friends Boo Bitch

Nightlife Alternative nightlife Bethnal Green Working Men's Club, Bethnal Green

‘Boo Bitch, get out the way’... is what you’ll be telling anyone who blocks your view of this cadaverous cabaret from drag troupe Mariah & Friendz. They are promising to go ALL OUT for Halloween. Fire breathing and aerial dance performances at past shows have made their regular venue Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club look like the set of Cirque du Soleils, so you can take their word for it. It’s impossible to see an M&F show without feeling elated. Lockdown blues? We don’t know her.

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Secret 7
Secret 7
Photograph: Secret 7

Secret 7"

Things to do Exhibitions Now Gallery, Greenwich Peninsula

Here’s how Secret  7” works: seven best-selling musicians have their singles pressed on a seven-inch vinyl record, with a run of 100 each. Then artists from around the world are invited to create an original sleeve design for each one. Finally, the records go on sale for a flat rate of £50. But therein lies the secret: until you hand over the fifty smackers, you don’t know what track or whose artwork is on your chosen sleeve. It could be Aretha Franklin’s ‘One Step Ahead’, or maybe Miles Davis’s ‘Miles Runs the Voodoo Down’. There’s a chance its sleeve is a one-of-a-kind artwork made by a big-name artist. Whatever you get, your £50 will go towards Help Refugees. See all the sleeves for free at Now Gallery’s exhibition this weekend. 

‘Nine Lives’

5 out of 5 stars
Theatre Drama Bridge Theatre, Tower Bridge

Playwright Zodwa Nyoni’s family moved from Zimbabwe to England in the late ’90s and she spent her adolescence applying for UK residency. It’s no wonder then that her one-man monologue following Ishmael (Lladel Bryant), a gay Zimbabwean asylum seeker dispersed to Leeds while he awaits a decision on his case, cuts straight through the inflamed tabloid headlines that often frame the conversation about immigration. Written in 2016 for Leeds Playhouse, it remains as relevant today as it did four years ago. It’s a stark, sparse piece that urges, above all, kindness – something we could all do with more of right now.

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Royal Ballet, Back on Stage, 2020
Royal Ballet, Back on Stage, 2020
Photo by Tristram Kenton

‘The Royal Ballet: Back on Stage’

News Theatre & Performance

The Royal Ballet is back on the Royal Opera House stage with new show, er, ‘Back on Stage’, a full-on extravaganza, with sumptuous design and the return of the full ballet – plus orchestra – barrelling through an evening of its greatest hits, from Fredrick Ashton to Hofesh Shechter. Watch it online for just £16 – a fraction of a usual ROH ticket. 

London cocktail week 2020
London cocktail week 2020
Photograph: London Cocktail Week

London Cocktail Week

4 out of 5 stars
Bars and pubs Cocktail bars Various, London

London’s bars are facing their most challenging year, so think of this Cocktail Week as Eat Out to Help Out, but for boozers. A £15 digital pass entitles you to £6 cocktails in some very swish-looking places throughout October (for perspective, a mezcal cocktail at Dalston’s Hacha would normally set you back £10.50). 

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c. The Trustees of the British Museum

Edmund de Waal: ‘Library of Exile’

Museums British Museum, Bloomsbury

It stings the heart, this installation by Edmund de Waal. The ceramicist and author has lined the walls of his room within a room in the British Museum with books by writers in exile. Albert Camus’s ‘Exile and the Kingdom’, Jean Rhys’s ‘Wide Sargasso Sea’, Ovid’s ‘Metamorphoses’. Shelf after shelf of stories written by people far from home, thinking of home.

I Am Curious, Orange, 1988
I Am Curious, Orange, 1988
Photograph: Michael Clark & Company with The Fall

Michael Clark: ‘Cosmic Dancer’

Art Barbican Hall, Barbican

If anyone really has managed to dance themselves right out the womb, it’s probably Michael Clark. This show is a comprehensive sweep through the maverick dancer and coreographer’s career which he spent mashing up post-punk with classical ballet. Head along for its opening weekend to see Clark’s original style through film, photography, paintings and sculptures, alongside his legendary collaborations with cult icons like Leigh Bowery, Sarah Lucas, The Fall and Wolfgang Tillmans. 

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Death of England: Delroy, National Theatre, 2020
Death of England: Delroy, National Theatre, 2020
Photo by National Theatre

‘Death of England: Delroy’

Theatre Drama National Theatre, South Bank

Here we go then: the National Theatre is back! Playwrights Roy Williams and Clint Dyer began writing this sort-of-sequel to last year’s ‘Death of England’ back in March. But their decision to pen a follow-up to their play about white English identity in which a working-class Black Englishman squares up to white Englishness feels nothing if not timely. Michael Balogun stars as the eponymous Black best friend to Michael, the deeply self-destructive protagonist played by Rafe Spall in the first play. 

Lighterman King’s Cross
Lighterman King’s Cross
The Lighterman. Photograph: Jason Bailey

London’s best outdoor dining

Restaurants

All right, so the hottest months are behind us, but there’s still ample opportunity for alfresco feasting. Whether you’re in the mood for spaghetti in the sun or schnitzel by starlight, our big ol' list should have you covered. Just be sure to book ahead, yeah? A lot of people want to eat, drink, and be merry outside at the minute.

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Forbidden Forest
Forbidden Forest
Photograph: Pop Up Screens

Forbidden Forest Cinema

Things to do Film events Copeland Park, Peckham

Spooky season is upon us and to mark the occasion you can watch scary films at Forbidden Forest Cinema, an ‘eerie woodland’ installation from Pop-Up Screens next to Peckham’s Bussey Building. This weekend watch ‘The Craft’, ‘It’, ‘Hocus Pocus’, or ‘Beetlejuice’ amongst some imported foliage. Wees in the trees? 

Arundhati Roy
Arundhati Roy
Photograph: Mayank Austen Soofi

‘Inside Out’

Things to do Online, London

Great news: the Southbank Centre is reopening! Less great news: you can’t go in! Instead, the shows in its Inside Out season of music and literature will broadcast the Royal Festival Hall to the wider world, with most viewable by purchasing a ticket to watch a live stream, and a number of the concerts aired on BBC Radio 3. This weekend watch talks with Arundhati Roy. Or, listen to concerts from the London Sinfonietta and the London Philharmonic Orchestra. 

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Adam Kay
Adam Kay
© Idil Sukan

Adam Kay: ‘This Is Going To Hurt’

4 out of 5 stars
Comedy Musical Apollo Theatre, Shaftesbury Avenue

Adam Kay – musical comedian and half of the Amateur Transplants – wrote a hugely successful book about the NHS and being a junior doctor. His live version of the show was due to run in the West End earlier this year, but got derailed for ‘obvious reasons’. However, it has the distinction of being the piece that will formally reopen Theatreland to audience, with its three week socially distanced run serving as a trial for a wider reopening of the Apollo Theatre.

 Costa del Tottenham
 Costa del Tottenham
Photograph: Costa del Tottenham

Costa del Tottenham

News Nightlife

The Cause’s Costa Del Tottenham is offering two ticket options in light of the new Tier Two restrictions. Same Household tickets will be allocated indoors and Mixed Household tables will be outdoors with full cover for rain (sitting outside with people not in your household is still allowed). This weekend join its Halloween party with Ivan Smagghe, Scott Fraser and Tia Cousins. 

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Grayson Perry America Works
Grayson Perry America Works
Photograph: Victoria Miro Gallery

Grayson Perry: ‘The Most Specialest Relationship’

Art Ceramics and pottery Victoria Miro, Islington

 

The UK’s second biggest potter – after that bloke with the wand – is back. Grayson Perry – author, broadcaster, lecturer, thinker, crossdresser and artist – is taking over Victoria Miro’s big Old Street space with a major show of new works. These pieces were all inspired by a trip across America, filmed for Channel 4 and broadcast in September, on a custom-built motorbike, engaging with communities across the land of the free. As a result, you can expect big topics and hot takes on all the major talking points of the day: gentrification, Black Lives Matter, gender identity etc. It’s Perry doing his usual incisive, insightful, but always kind-hearted thing. Entry is free with a timed ticket. 
Royal Ballet, Back on Stage, 2020
Royal Ballet, Back on Stage, 2020
Photo by Tristram Kenton

The Royal Opera House: ‘4/4’

News Theatre & Performance

The Royal Opera House is back with a slightly different autumn season than usual. The latest performance in these New Normal times is ‘4/4’ - an evening of specially-curated opera with celebrated directors like Adele Thomas, Deborah Warner, Richard Jones and Antony McDonald, paired with composers, conductors, singers and small ensembles of musicians in bold works by Handel, Gruber, Barber and Britten. It will be available to watch for £16 via the ROH Stream player until Nov 16. 

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01 Installation view of Summer Exhibition 2019, Royal Academy of Arts, London.
01 Installation view of Summer Exhibition 2019, Royal Academy of Arts, London.
Photograph: Royal Academy of Arts / David Parry

Royal Academy Summer Exhibition

3 out of 5 stars
Art Royal Academy of Arts, Mayfair

Bit late for the Summer Exhibition, isn’t it? Yes, but calling the Royal Academy’s annual open-submission mega-show the ‘Autumn Exhibition’ just doesn’t have the same ring to it. So it’s the same thing we get every summer – floor-to-ceiling art by greats and unknowns alike, plus all those little stickers on the walls – only a few months later thanks to the year that is 2020. 

 

Titian 'Rape of Europa' (1562) © Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston.

‘Titian: Love, Desire, Death’

Art National Gallery, Trafalgar Square

Bodies flailing through the air, mythical creatures rushing by in a blur, golden rays of light and mounds and mounds of flesh: Titian’s poesie series is wild, dramatic, violent, and very, very sensual. 

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Dante's In Furlough, The Vaults, 2020
Dante's In Furlough, The Vaults, 2020
Photo by The Vaults

‘Dante’s In Furlough’

Theatre Interactive The Vaults, Waterloo

Is it a terrible name? Is it a brilliant name? Is an immersive theatre show based on Dante’s ‘Inferno’, the Shel Silverstein’s epic 1977 poem ‘Billy Markham and the Devil’, and our present, ah, ‘situation’ exactly what we need right now or just too many things to even really contemplate? 

HydePark_©GilesBarnard.jpg
HydePark_©GilesBarnard.jpg
© Giles Barnard, courtesy Royal Parks

The best London autumn walks

Things to do Walks and tours

London is great during the summer, but it’s during the autumn months that the city is at its most beautiful. Get out and about  as the greenery of the summer months starts to turn and the trees take on warm red, orange and yellow hues. These are the most beautiful London parks for a colourful autumn walk.

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Installation view of Bruce Nauman at Tate Modern featuring Anthro/Socio (Rin de Sp inning) 1992 . Photograph by Tate Photography (Matt Greenwood). Artwork (c) Bruce Nauman / ARS, NY and DACS, London 2020
Installation view of Bruce Nauman at Tate Modern featuring Anthro/Socio (Rin de Sp inning) 1992 . Photograph by Tate Photography (Matt Greenwood). Artwork (c) Bruce Nauman / ARS, NY and DACS, London 2020
Installation view of Bruce Nauman at Tate Modern featuring Anthro/Socio (Rin de Sp inning) 1992 . Photograph by Tate Photography (Matt Greenwood). Artwork (c) Bruce Nauman / ARS, NY and DACS, London 2020

Bruce Nauman at Tate Modern

Art Contemporary art Tate Modern, Bankside

One of Bruce Nauman’s works is called ‘Clown Torture’. That’s all you need to know about the pivotal, ultra-influential American artist, who’s finally getting a seriously big Tate show this autumn. Head along for its first weekend to soo neons, installations, films: this show is going to have it all. Plus the aforementioned clown torture.

London Wetland Centre
London Wetland Centre
Photograph: London Wetland Centre

Wetlands Unravelled

Things to do London Wetland Centre, Barnes

Not to be confused with the manicured Walthamstow Wetlands, this outdoor art exhibition is taking place in the reedbeds of the London Wetlands Centre in Barnes. The one with the otters. To mark its twentieth anniversary, the centre is carefully placing sculptures and sound installations among the watery habitat that you can view from a distance. Look out for Alec Stevens’s ‘That Sinking Feeling’, little houses that protrude from the lagoon, reminding us of rising water levels, while the ducks swim around them without a care in the world. 

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The Last Five Years, Southwark Playhouse, 2020
The Last Five Years, Southwark Playhouse, 2020
Photograph: PAMELA RAITH

‘The Last Five Years’

Theatre Musicals Southwark Playhouse, Elephant & Castle

The Last Five Years’ reopens a socially-distanced Southwark Playhouse. Molly Lynch and Oli Higginson will reprise their roles.

Oktoberfest at Bierschenke

Oktoberfest at Bierschenke

5 out of 5 stars
Things to do Festivals Bierschenke, Moorgate

Trying to find a good Oktoberfest is just chasing a luftschloß (that’s German for an unrealistic dream). But if you’re going to go for it, try and find one that at least vaguely resembles a Munich beer hall, like Bierschenke in Liverpool Street. It’s been at it for a decade, serving up traditional Bavarian wurst to thousands of Londoners every year. And unlike a lot of other soulless stein-peddlers, entry for this one is free.

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© Tate photography (Matt Greenwood)

Kara Walker: ‘Fons Americanus’

Art Contemporary art Tate Modern, Bankside

London’s streets are haunted by vile ghosts. Everywhere you walk, there are statues of Britons who conquered the world and pillaged its nations looming over you. And in front of Buckingham Palace stands the Victoria Memorial, an ornate, lavish celebration of Queen Vic and her imperial achievements. Now a version of it haunts the Turbine Hall. But American artist Kara Walker’s bubbling fountain isn’t a celebration of the British Empire, it’s a vicious, angry, fearsome attack on it.

Photograph: Trulee Hall, Golden Corn Entryway with Boob Fountain, 2018. Installation view at Maccarone, Los Angeles. Courtesy the artist, Zabludowicz Collection in collaboration with Tamares Real Estate Holdings, Inc. and Maccarone, Los Angeles. Photo: Co
Photograph: Trulee Hall, Golden Corn Entryway with Boob Fountain, 2018. Installation view at Maccarone, Los Angeles. Courtesy the artist, Zabludowicz Collection in collaboration with Tamares Real Estate Holdings, Inc. and Maccarone, Los Angeles. Photo: Co
Photograph: Trulee Hall, Golden Corn Entryway with Boob Fountain, 2018. Installation view at Maccarone, Los Angeles. Courtesy the artist, Zabludowicz Collection in collaboration with Tamares Real Estate Holdings, Inc. and Maccarone, Los Angeles. Photo: Co

Trulee Hall

Art Installation Zabludowicz Collection, Kentish Town

Care to enter a golden cave flanked by two priapic corncob pillars? Good, that’s exactly how you’ll experience artist Trulee Hall’s fun house of the ‘erotic grotesque’ installation at the Zabludowicz Collection. Here are just a few things you’ll find at Hall’s solo exhibition: glory holes, discordant music, naked bodies, flayed pop culture references, nightmarish serpents and a psychosexual opera exploring gender and sexuality. It’s a mix of video and sculpture and it’s all deeply weird. So you have to go. 

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'Figure (Sarvabuddhadakini). Na-ro-mkhah-spyod-ma' (19th century) © The Trustees of the British Museum

‘Tantra: Enlightenment to Revolution’

Museums British Museum, Bloomsbury

Clear all the images of a naked Sting from your mind, because the British Museum’s new exhibition is all about uncovering the truth behind the beautiful, esoteric Eastern philosophical movement. Expect centuries’ worth of stunning objects, prints and paintings.

Photograph: Crockford Bridge Farm

Pumpkin season in London

Things to do

Autumn is here! Which means plump orange orbs are starting to pop up around London. Yep, pumpkin season is upon us, but these spherical squashes aren’t just for Halloween. Achieve your squash goals this year by spending the weekend picking them at some of our favourite veggie picking spots. 

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Amelia Troubridge, Michael Wojas hoovering at The Colony Rooms, 2008, Giclée digital archival print, 16 x 12 in. © Amelia Troubridge. Courtesy of Dellasposa Gallery - Juliet Martin.jpg
Amelia Troubridge, Michael Wojas hoovering at The Colony Rooms, 2008, Giclée digital archival print, 16 x 12 in. © Amelia Troubridge. Courtesy of Dellasposa Gallery - Juliet Martin.jpg
Photograph: Amelia Troubridge, courtesy of Dellasposa Gallery

‘Tales from The Colony Room: Art and Bohemia’

Missing the days of crowded, unpredictable nights in the pub? Make an appointment at Dellasposa Gallery to see this exhibition of artworks by Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Nina Hamnett and Eduardo Paolozzi, who were all regulars at the infamous Soho drinking den The Colony Rooms. It’s a chance to get a flavour of the Colony Room days, safe from the risk of a punch in the face from a drunken Francis B. Find out more here

 Installation View Kai Althoff goes with Bernard Leach Whitechapel Gallery Photo: Polly Eltes In
 Installation View Kai Althoff goes with Bernard Leach Whitechapel Gallery Photo: Polly Eltes In
Installation View Kai Althoff goes with Bernard Leach Whitechapel Gallery Photo: Polly Eltes In

'Kai Althoff Goes With Bernard Leach'

Art Painting Whitechapel Gallery, Whitechapel

Under a filthy plastic tarp, Kai Althoff tells his impenetrable stories. The German painter has lowered the Whitechapel’s ceiling and littered it with leaves and debris. You walk under this dirty, constricting canopy to pore over his mystical, romantic, violent works. 

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george michael
george michael
Dawn Mellor's Studies of George Michael and Andrew Ridgeley (1984-85) Courtesy of the artist

Brent Biennial

News Art

Plans for a nine-foot mural of George Michael’s face on Kingsbury Road have (understandably) dominated its news coverage, but there’s more to the Brent Biennial than his beautiful bouffant. The borough’s libraries, parks, public spaces and coin-op launderettes are opening up to esoteric installations and anthropolitical art projects that will dissect the history of Brent. Artists David Blandy, Imran Qureshi and Barby Asante will all be taking part. If someone offers you a DVD, don’t turn it down – it might be the work of artist Adam Farah, who has used his commission to burn short films and reflections on to discs he will hand out to the public for free. Or it might be a pirate copy of ‘Mall Cop’. That’s a risk you’ll have to take. Read the full programme here

Atrium of IWM London with the artwork "History of Bombs" by Ai Wei Wei.
Atrium of IWM London with the artwork "History of Bombs" by Ai Wei Wei.
Photograph: © IWM

Ai Weiwei: ‘History of Bombs’

Art Imperial War Museum, Lambeth

The Imperial War Museum has reopened with a startling installation from Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei. The show sees life-size diagrams of explosive devices – from WWI hand grenades to nuclear missiles – cover the IWM’s floor and stairs. It’s cold and implacable, eerie and weirdly beautiful. 

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Brixton Courtyard
Brixton Courtyard
Photograph: Brixton Courtyard

Brixton Courtyard

News Drinking

South London music venue Brixton Jamm has renovated its outdoor space with spaced-out booths and picnic benches. On Saturday, join a Halloween party with Oliver Smith and JVNC Collective. On Sunday, Notting Hill Carnival favourites Channel One are back for another of their Sunday socials. 

 

 

columbia road flower market after covid
columbia road flower market after covid
Photograph: mikecphoto / Shutterstock

The best markets in London

Shopping Markets and fairs

Markets are woven into the fabric of London life and make for the perfect weekend activity. From foodie stands to stalls filled with flowers, these are the ones worth making a beeline for. 

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Introductions: Early Embodiment from A Countervailing Theory, (2019) © Toyin Ojih Odutola. Image courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Toyin Ojih Odutola: ‘A Countervailing Theory’

Art Barbican Centre, Barbican

Drawing, for Toyin Ojih Odutola, is a form of storytelling. These new works, exhibited around the 90-metre sweep of the Barbican Curve, form part of an epic series relaying an imagined ancient myth. The artist uses pencil, pastel, ballpoint pen and charcoal to create the mega-sized portraits that are as delicate as they are beautiful. 

Truman’s Social Club
Truman’s Social Club
Photograph: Truman’s Social Club

Truman’s Social Club

News Drinking

The folk behind east London craft brewery Truman’s have heard our call and have opened what they’re calling ‘the biggest socially distanced pub and garden’ to London. The brewery has transformed a 35,000-square-foot venue in Walthamstow into Truman’s Social Club, which allows plenty of space for social distancing. There’s a catch: you’ll have to pre-book to get a seat. 

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Andy Warhol 'Marilyn Diptych' (1962) Tate © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc / Artists Right Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London

Andy Warhol

3 out of 5 stars
Art Tate Modern, Bankside

This show is full of those celebrities. Stacks of soup cans, piles of boxes of Brillo pads, dozens of Marilyns, repeated Elvises. You already know these works by Andy Warhol: you can’t not, they’re inescapable. But what this show really tries to do is present Warhol as something more than just headlines and bright colours. Tickets are still available for this Sunday. Grab ’em quick. 

Mount Stewart, County Down
Mount Stewart, County Down
Photograph: National Trust

The National Trust Parks

News Transport & Travel

As lockdown eases, the National Trust and its glorious green spaces are springing back to life. Some of the Trust’s outdoor spaces are now open for you to get a healthy dose of the green stuff, but many have a new pre-booking system in place to ensure crowds are restricted and social distancing can be upheld, so do check if spaces are sold out before visiting. 

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