Things to do in New York today

The day's best things to do in New York—including free and cheap activities, concerts, screenings, shows, parties and more. It's your social emergency savior.

Photograph: Robert McKeever
Takashi Murakami, courtesy Gagosian Gallery
1

Antiheroes: A Panel Discussion

Critics' pick

To celebrate the release of author and journalist Adam Sternbergh’s new thriller, Near Enemy, a few of his colleagues and friends gather to chat about the role of the antihero in fictional narratives. Joining Sternbergh are The New Yorker's Emily Nussbaum, New York Times film critic A.O. Scott and author Megan Abbott.

Read more
McNally Jackson Books Tuesday January 27 2015 Free
2

Eat, Drink & Be Literary

Critics' pick

This series of casual literary evenings features a buffet dinner, including wine and dessert, and a reading from a noteworthy writer, followed by a moderated Q&A about the author's creative process. The 2015 season kicks off with Dinaw Mengestu, journalist, MacArthur "Genius" grant recipient and author of, most recently, All Our Names. Editor Deborah Treisman moderates.

Read more
BAMcafé Tuesday January 27 2015
3

Ne-Yo

Critics' pick

Slick pop crooner Ne-Yo celebrates a new album, Non-Fiction, his sixth, out today. Though the new disc will be the first order of business, we can't imagine classics like "Miss Independent" won't get an airing as well.

Read more
Stage 48 Tuesday January 27 2015
4

Uptown Showdown

Critics' pick

Two teams of comics and comic writers face off in a debate competition meant to settle age-old arguments, such as whether pirates or ninjas would win in a brawl. As the performers take shots at each other and do untested material, the room gets charged (in the silliest way possible).

Read more
Symphony Space Tuesday January 27 2015
5

John Waters, "Beverly Hills John"

Since pursuing his career as an artist, Waters hasn't made many movies, but he returns to form in his third show at Boesky with a 74-minute video “sequel” of Pink Flamingos. Tilted Kiddie Flamingos, the film depicts child actors doing a table read of the original script—only with sanitized dialog. But as with all things Waters, the self-censorship is meant to be tongue in cheek.

Read more
Marianne Boesky Gallery Until Saturday February 14 2015 Free

Pop-Up Concerts

Critics' pick

Miller Theatre continues its popular series of informal, free new-music primers with "Trios by Zorn," a quick hit of chamber works by magpie New York composer John Zorn, as played by a handpicked group that includes pianist Vicky Chow.

Read more
Miller Theatre (at Columbia University), Morningside Heights Tuesday January 27 2015 Free

Focus! 2015

Critics' pick

The Juilliard School devotes its annual winter new-music festival to Japanese music written after 1945. Composer names familiar to new-music fans—such as Takemitsu, Toshio Hosokawa and Dai Fujikura—figure into many of the sets. Though one of the main conceptual draws of this free festival is the chance to discover lesser-known names. See events.juilliard.edu for details.

Read more
Peter Jay Sharp Theater (at the Juilliard School), Upper West Side Until Friday January 30 2015 Free

Antiheroes: A Panel Discussion

Critics' pick

To celebrate the release of author and journalist Adam Sternbergh’s new thriller, Near Enemy, a few of his colleagues and friends gather to chat about the role of the antihero in fictional narratives. Joining Sternbergh are The New Yorker's Emily Nussbaum, New York Times film critic A.O. Scott and author Megan Abbott.

Read more
McNally Jackson Books, Soho Tuesday January 27 2015 Free

Mouth Party

Enjoy stand-up, $2 beers and free pizza at the seventh edition of this monthly show, coproduced by Jimmy LeChase and MC Dan Fisher.

Read more
Brit Pack, Soho Tuesday January 27 2015 Free

David Shields with Richard Nash

Two men spend four days in a cabin in the woods. It may sound like the start to a joke, but it’s actually the inspiration for Shields’s new book, which chronicles the time he spent discussing art and life with his friend Caleb Powell. The author shares his provocative, two-sided story alongside publisher Richard Nash.

Read more
Community Bookstore, Park Slope Tuesday January 27 2015 Free

Vivian Apple at the End of the World Launch Party

This event has been postponed due to inclement weather. Katie Coyle fetes her new YA book with a festive event for all ages, including free drinks, snacks and music. Fellow writers Julie Buntin and Ashley C. Ford join Coyle for readings and merriment.

Read more
Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, Soho Tuesday January 27 2015 Free

Anne Waldman and Devin Brahja Waldman

A legendary poet and former director of the Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church, Waldman reads and performs work from her latest books, Gossamurmur and Jaguar Harmonics. Her nephew Devin accompanies the presentation on the saxophone.

Read more
St. Mark’s Bookshop, East Village Tuesday January 27 2015 Free

Whiplash

Critics' pick

This wildly popular show is known for its surprise special guests—comics like Chris Rock, David Cross and others have appeared.

Read more
Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, Chelsea Until Tuesday December 29 2015 Free

Hot Soup!

Critics' pick

From what we can tell, maybe the only thing missing from this tasty stand-up show curated by Matt Ruby, Mark Normand and Gary Vider is actual soup.

Read more
The Irish Exit, Midtown East Until Tuesday December 29 2015 Free

Bad Drag Queen

Critics' pick

The hilarious Bob the Drag Queen glams up audience members for this aggressively amateur weekly contest.

Read more
Tuesday January 27 2015 Free
See more free things to do today

Bridget Everett: Rock Bottom

Critics' pick

Bridget Everett: Rock Bottom. Joe’s Pub (see Off Broadway). By Bridget Everett. Music and lyrics by Everett, Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman. Directed by Wittman. With Everett. Running time: 1hr 40mins. No intermission. Rock Bottom: In brief The astonishing, totally fearless Amazon of alt cabaret and raunchy comedy (Inside Amy Schumer) returns to Joe's with a new show commissioned for the venue. Cocreated with Broadway's Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman (Hairspray) and Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz, this is full-contact New York magic, and not to be missed. Rock Bottom: Theater review by David Cote I was a Bridget Everett virgin before Rock Bottom, so yes, there was some blood. There was also lots of spilled chardonnay, sweat and a few other fluids I’d rather not name. In other words, it was all flavors of crazy, and I loved every second. How is it possible that for years I’ve missed Everett’s vaginacentric shock comedy and rafter-splitting rock belt? Fear, if we’re being truthful. I’d seen the pictures, heard the titles and assumed she was too much woman to handle. Still, her latest cabaret act—with songs cowritten by Broadway vets Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman (Hairspray), as well as with Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz and Matt Ray­—is a nice way to ease, semi-lubed, into the Everett aesthetic. Between a ditty about sampling international dong, “Tell Me (Does This Dick Make My Ass Look Big?),” and a nearly scatological dalliance with a British film star, “A Man So Fine,” Everett works

Read more
Joe's Pub at the Public Theater, Greenwich Village Until Friday February 20 2015

Slavic Soul Party!

Critics' pick

Of all the NYC dance bands that draw on Eastern European music, Slavic Soul Party!—in residency at Barbès for more than a decade—is the coolest. And the group isn’t preoccupied with rebelling against the Old World. Live, the band’s members prove they're acutely aware of the common principle that unites the traditions they borrow from: Music ought to move you.

Read more
Barbès, Park Slope Until Tuesday February 24 2015

Ne-Yo

Critics' pick

Slick pop crooner Ne-Yo celebrates a new album, Non-Fiction, his sixth, out today. Though the new disc will be the first order of business, we can't imagine classics like "Miss Independent" won't get an airing as well.

Read more
Stage 48, Hell's Kitchen Tuesday January 27 2015

Vanguard Jazz Orchestra

Critics' pick

Monday night big bands are a Gotham staple, but this is the one that started it all. Celebrating its 49th year at the club, the orchestra created by late greats Thad Jones and Mel Lewis purrs and roars all week.

Read more
Village Vanguard, West Village Until Sunday February 1 2015

London Grammar + Until the Ribbon Breaks

Critics' pick

Fast-rising British indie-pop trio London Grammar hits NYC with support from soulful electro-R&B songster Pete Lawrie Winfield, a.k.a. Until the Ribbon Breaks.

Read more
Terminal 5, Midtown West Tuesday January 27 2015

Years & Years

Critics' pick

This London electro-pop trio got quite the bump a month ago when the BBC announced them as the winner of its Sound of 2015 award (a distinction earned the previous two years by Sam Smith and Haim). If you like your pop music shimmery and cleanly produced with a thudding electronic pulse, we’d advise you have a listen sooner than later.

Read more
Rough Trade NYC, Williamsburg Tuesday January 27 2015

Bettye LaVette

Critics' pick

In her riveting previous sets at the Carlyle, loved and lauded veteran soulstress Bettye LaVette has let her soul voice soar like a phoenix shaking its ash. Now she returns to wrap her gloriously ravaged tonsils around songs by Bob Dylan, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and more.

Read more
Café Carlyle (in the Carlyle Hotel), Upper East Side Until Saturday February 7 2015

Nathan Lee Graham: Berlin Ballyhoo

Critics' pick

The sassy Nathan Lee Graham (Priscilla Queen of the Desert) takes a tour of Irving Berlin in a celebration of one of the Great American Songbook's most prolific and successful writers.

Read more
Metropolitan Room, Chelsea Tuesday January 27 2015

Jim Campilongo

Critics' pick

Every Tuesday, versatile twang-rock guitarist Jim Campilongo, a regular at the Living Room's old LES location, furnishes soulful grooves, stinging licks and friendly vibes with help from a revolving cast of collaborators in the club's new Williamsburg digs.

Read more
Tuesday January 27 2015

"Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs"

Critics' pick

The explanatory text on the wall at the beginning of MoMA’s blockbuster of around one hundred of Henri Matisse’s cut-outs notes that these well-known works attempted to resolve the “eternal conflict of drawing and color.” Epic though that reconciliation may have been, it feels faraway and quaint these days. Despite his immense popularity, Matisse’s emphasis on formal innovation and aesthetic pleasure may make him the modern master most alien to the dry, over-intellectualized “conceptual” maneuvers that fill so many New York galleries. Thus, this rather glorious exhibition feels tonic. Matisse first took scissors to paper in the 1930s to work out figural compositions for murals and theater curtains, representing dancers with schematic forms alternately sinuous and angular, and counterintuitively achieving a remarkable feeling of movement and gravity with ostensibly unwieldy materials. During World War II, he used the technique to create the great artist book Jazz (1947). The book’s circus theme, bright hues, and delightfully recognizable flat shapes evoke picture books for children, masking its suggestions of wartime violence: Starbursts in red and yellow on and around bodies evoke open wounds and exploding shells. The 20 maquettes, all of which are on view, appear wonderfully handmade compared to the final stenciled pages, a fact noted by the artist himself, which led him to consider the possibilities of the cut-outs as independent works of art. During the decade before his d

Read more
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Midtown East Until Tuesday February 10 2015

"El Greco in New York"

Critics' pick

Romantics and Modernists alike treasured the old master El Greco (1541–1614) for the skewed perspectives and strangely distorted figures that fill his paintings—that is, when they weren’t blaming those aesthetic quirks on drugs, madness, or astigmatism. For the 400th anniversary of his death, three New York institutions have gathered their substantial holdings of the painter’s works—at 19 paintings, more than anywhere outside of the Prado in Madrid!—in two concise exhibitions. While “El Greco at the Frick Collection” comprises three canvases, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “El Greco in New York” features contributions from the Hispanic Society of America, as well as its own collection. The larger Met show allows us to trace the artist’s trajectory. Born Domenikos Theotokopoulos in Crete, then a Venetian possession, El Greco painted Byzantine icons before leaving to study in Italy. The early Christ Healing the Blind, ca. 1570, a fairly typical late-Renaissance religious scene, shows the influence of his artistic training in Venice in its impressive if imperfect approximation of the modes of artists such as Veronese. In 1577, El Greco moved permanently to Spain. Subsequent devotional pictures show the artist’s increasing mastery of Renaissance idiom. Christ Carrying the Cross, ca. 1580–85 (watery-eyed, but with a perfect manicure), and The Holy Family, ca. 1585 (the Madonna charming, with an up-do and a gauzy mantilla; the nursing baby Jesus beady-eyed, with an oddly shaped h

Read more
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Upper East Side Until Sunday February 1 2015

Sam Falls, "Light Over Time"

Critics' pick

A process-oriented Los Angeles artist who works in a variety of media, Sam Falls has transformed Downtown Brooklyn’s MetroTech Commons into a playground for his interactive art. Exploring the passage of time through light and color, Falls displays several sculptural works that are activated by the viewer and will physically alter over time. His Untitled (Thermochromic bench), for example, changes color due to heat generated by sitters or the intensity of sunlight. A maze has been painted with multicolored layers of powder-coated aluminum; one side has protective UV coating while the other doesn’t, so that the piece will partially fade from exposure. But as it does, another layer of paint will eventually emerge and regenerate the original color. A set of teeter-totters feature geometric forms that collect rainwater, thus changing the distribution of weight. A giant wind chime is too big for an ordinary breeze to move it, so visitors do the job instead by pushing the chimes around. A more solitary experience is provided by a pair of white, aluminum shelters with tiny entrances and stained-glass skylights. The ambience within each of these “light rooms,” as the artist calls them, will change with the weather. Playful and thought-provoking, these laboratories of fun seek to engage the curious child inside all of us.—Paul Laster

Read more
Public Art Fund at MetroTech Center Commons, Downtown Until Friday May 29 2015 Free

"The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World"

Critics' pick

A dispiriting show that doesn't do its participants any favors, “The Forever Now” brings together 17 painters, the youngest born in 1986 and the oldest in 1955. All are current market favorites. Commendably, over half of them are women. Organized by MoMA’s Laura Hoptman, the exhibition is premised on the notion that our culture is characterized by the reprise and the mash-up and that contemporary painting follows suit (The show’s catalog essay quotes science fiction writer William Gibson and media theorist Douglas Rushkoff, among others, on the end of progress and the atemporality of modern cultural artifacts in the digital age.) In support of this contention, Hoptman subjects some very good artworks to reductive readings while including too many mediocre examples. Which isn’t to say that there aren’t any terrific pieces on view. German artist Michaela Eichwald’s newly scaled-up abstractions—particularly a long horizontal work in which fetus-like forms and painterly passages in dirty whites, yellows, pinks and reds march across a matte black ground—are some of the best things in the show. Hoptman suggests that Eichwald is referencing Abstract Expressionism, completely missing the artist’s origins in the 1980s Cologne art scene, where doubts about historical relevance mixed with deliberately awkward painting—a approach that was also employed by Martin Kippenberger, Albert Oehlen, Michael Krebber and other members of that milieu. Elsewhere, a wall is given over to Joe Bradl

Read more
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Midtown East Until Thursday March 5 2015

"Jean Dubuffet: Soul of the Underground"

Critics' pick

Assembled from MoMA’s holdings of work by Jean Dubuffet (1901–1985), this beautifully realized exhibition illustrates how Dubuffet’s rebellion against conventional good taste and artistic hierarchies was enacted through his materials and techniques. Comprising pieces from the 1940s to the mid-1960s, “Jean Dubuffet: Soul of the Underground” includes wonderful figurative sculptures assembled from slag and tree roots, as well as paintings and drawings depicting people—wandering through deserts, packed into subway cars—crudely scratched into thickly impastoed canvases or inked paper. But its primary focus is on Dubuffet the printmaker, using the medium as “an incomparable laboratory and an efficacious means of invention.” Central to the show is a selection of lithographs from Dubuffet’s series “Phenomena” (1958–1962), a compendium of 362 allover compositions, created by scuffing, scratching and staining lithographic stones, sometimes with stuff like fruit peels and tapioca. Often, he would cut up the finished results to produce new works. For the most part, Dubuffet’s recycled prints are representational. In the collage Black Earth (1955), the three figures occupying a nocturnal patch of gray and black landscape are fashioned from the same white-spattered paper as the starry sky above. Elsewhere, characters such as The Sleepwalker and Carrot Nose (both from 1961) sport hats and clothes seemingly made out of cosmic dust. But other pieces are more confounding: paintings with phra

Read more
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Midtown East Until Thursday March 5 2015

Mike Nelson, Gang of Seven

Critics' pick

Ambitious installations underpinned by narrative conceits are the stock-in-trade of this British artist, a two-time short-lister for the Turner Prize who was also Britain's representative at the 2011 Venice Biennale. His mix of storytelling and elaborately crafted interior settings owe more than a small debt to the work Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, though he adds a bit of dour British stoicism to their dour Russian resignation. His current installation consists of assemblages created out of driftwood and washed-up detritus; in Nelson's backstory, they were collected along the shores of British Columbia by a fictional beachcomber who imagines the ocean as an inchoate yet sentient being.

Read more
303 Gallery, Chelsea Until Saturday February 21 2015 Free

Yael Bartana

Critics' pick

Inspired by the replica of Solomon’s Temple built by evangelical Christians in Brazil, Yael Bartana’s video Inferno opens with a menorah and the Ark of the Covenant being helicoptered over São Paulo, followed by a multiracial rainbow of men, women and children flocking to the temple to receive priestly benediction. Suddenly, for no apparent reason, an earthquake shatters the proceedings, and the temple bursts into flames. Is it divine retribution for monumental hubris? For the blasphemy of a high priest in drag? Or it is for the truly unforgivable sin of white-robed congregants wearing Carmen Miranda headpieces made of fake fruit and flowers? Regardless, a denouement shows the temple reduced to an ersatz Wailing Wall, complete with souvenir vendors and worshippers happily praying and dancing. We might expect something meaty in an Israeli artist’s riff on cross-cultural translations of religious faith, as well as the tenacity of an ancient Semitic cult in the face of millennial catastrophes. But Inferno just seems silly, its medium-budget production generating little heat, especially after Eve Sussman’s The Rape of the Sabine Women and Francesco Vezzoli’s Trailer for a Remake of Gore Vidal’s Caligula have essayed sword-and-sandal reenactments to much greater effect. A second video, True Finn, finds a group of immigrants gathered in a snowy retreat to debate questions of national authenticity. The earnest documentary draws too-obvious analogies with other multicultural societie

Read more
Petzel Gallery, Chelsea Until Saturday February 14 2015 Free

Joe Fyfe, "make me one with everything"

Critics' pick

Fyfe's pieces are both formal and throwaway, made of fabrics and found objects ranging from felt and flags to broken umbrellas and cracked automobile bumpers. Some of his materials, including vividly graphic ads in Korean, were rescued from markets in Asia, where he spent some time on a Fulbright scholarship. Hints of Rauschenberg and Tuttle can be seen in Fyfe's work, but it's uniquely and magnetically his own.

Read more
Longhouse Projects, Soho Until Saturday February 7 2015 Free

Tal R, "Altstadt Girl"

Critics' pick

This Danish artist born in Israel has described his work a boiling pot into which he throws all kinds of materials, and as with many contemporary painters today, materials in the case means assorted references to 20th-century modernism couched in a naive or folkloric style. His work is often based on his personal experiences and Jewish identity, unfolding as dreamscapes (picture a cross between Chagall and Picasso). This show focuses on portraits of women in confined compositions.

Read more
Cheim & Read, Chelsea Until Saturday February 14 2015 Free

Helmut Lang

Critics' pick

Back in 2005, the famed Vienna born designer of minimalist fashion announced that he was hanging up his scissors to pursue his dream of being an artist. People in the fashion industry were understandably skeptical, as were some in the art world. However, he's stuck to his guns, and now he's having his first solo show in New York with a presentation of sculptures made of resin and pigment. Taut pillar-shaped forms are exhibited along with flat, sheetlike pieces resembling plankton. According to Lang, it's all about exploring materials "with a certain history, elements with irreplaceable presence and with scars and memories of a former purpose."

Read more
Sperone Westwater, Lower East Side Until Saturday February 21 2015 Free

Whiplash

Critics' pick

This wildly popular show is known for its surprise special guests—comics like Chris Rock, David Cross and others have appeared.

Read more
Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, Chelsea Until Tuesday December 29 2015 Free

Bridget Everett: Rock Bottom

Critics' pick

Bridget Everett: Rock Bottom. Joe’s Pub (see Off Broadway). By Bridget Everett. Music and lyrics by Everett, Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman. Directed by Wittman. With Everett. Running time: 1hr 40mins. No intermission. Rock Bottom: In brief The astonishing, totally fearless Amazon of alt cabaret and raunchy comedy (Inside Amy Schumer) returns to Joe's with a new show commissioned for the venue. Cocreated with Broadway's Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman (Hairspray) and Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz, this is full-contact New York magic, and not to be missed. Rock Bottom: Theater review by David Cote I was a Bridget Everett virgin before Rock Bottom, so yes, there was some blood. There was also lots of spilled chardonnay, sweat and a few other fluids I’d rather not name. In other words, it was all flavors of crazy, and I loved every second. How is it possible that for years I’ve missed Everett’s vaginacentric shock comedy and rafter-splitting rock belt? Fear, if we’re being truthful. I’d seen the pictures, heard the titles and assumed she was too much woman to handle. Still, her latest cabaret act—with songs cowritten by Broadway vets Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman (Hairspray), as well as with Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz and Matt Ray­—is a nice way to ease, semi-lubed, into the Everett aesthetic. Between a ditty about sampling international dong, “Tell Me (Does This Dick Make My Ass Look Big?),” and a nearly scatological dalliance with a British film star, “A Man So Fine,” Everett works

Read more
Joe's Pub at the Public Theater, Greenwich Village Until Friday February 20 2015

Hot Soup!

Critics' pick

From what we can tell, maybe the only thing missing from this tasty stand-up show curated by Matt Ruby, Mark Normand and Gary Vider is actual soup.

Read more
The Irish Exit, Midtown East Until Tuesday December 29 2015 Free

ComedyJuice

Critics' pick

This revered weekly show features lots of worthy local stand-ups and often one or two big names, thanks to the draw of the top comedy giant.

Read more
Tuesday January 27 2015

Sweet

Critics' pick

Seth Herzog's weekly mainstay, which has settled back in its longtime home at the Slipper Room, still features scads of downtown stand-ups and, quite often, Herzog's mother.

Read more
Tuesday January 27 2015
See more of tonight's best comedy

Nutcracker Rouge

Critics' pick

[Note: The review below is from a previous run of Nutcracker Rouge. The revived production is at XIV, Company XIV's new home in the East Village, and the current cast does not include Marisol Cabrera and Jeff Takacs.) Nutcracker Rouge. Minetta Lane Theatre (see Off Broadway). Directed and choreographed by Austin McCormick. With ensemble cast. Running time: 1hr 50mins. One intermission. Nutcracker Rouge: In brief Austin McCormick and his risqué neobaroque dance theater Company XIV present a lavish erotic reimagining of a classic holiday tale (adapted by Jeff Takacs), complete with circus performers, operatic singers and partial nudity. Nutcracker Rouge: Theater review by David Cote Around this time of year, the word nutcracker conjures so much innocent wonder: Tchaikovsky’s beloved score, the dance of the sugarplum fairy, glitter pasties, stripper poles, comically large stuffed penises.… Oh, did I lose you there? Director-choreographer Austin McCormick has taken the Christmas staple and given it a NSFW spin. Nutcracker Rouge is the perfect hot date: a rated-R riff on the tale of Clara and an enchanted appliance—which may require batteries. Our wide-eyed heroine is now an adult named Marie Claire (Laura Careless, agog and breathing heavily), and the world she discovers is a wintry realm of half-naked dancers and acrobats, gyrating and performing physical stunts that send her into ecstasies of arousal. They get the audience riled up, too. Decked out in Zane Pihlstrom’s eye-po

Read more
XIV, East Village Until Saturday January 31 2015

Bad Drag Queen

Critics' pick

The hilarious Bob the Drag Queen glams up audience members for this aggressively amateur weekly contest.

Read more
Tuesday January 27 2015 Free

Touch

Critics' pick

The Hot Rabbit gang invites you to ruin your Wednesday morning at this weekly gipster wingding with a different headlining DJ each week.

Read more
Tuesday January 27 2015 Free

Release: DJ Disciple and Friends

Critics' pick

The Grammy-nominated DJ Disciple, a fixture of the NYC scene for years, takes control of the Lower East Side's intimate Sapphire every Tuesday for a night of house rhythms.

Read more
Tuesday January 27 2015
See more of tonight's best nightlife

Comments

7 comments
Briana P
Briana P

Do TimeOut's 'undateables' include any senior citizens?   I haven't seen any, but maybe I missed something.    If you haven't featured any yet, it would be great to see some soon.   There are plenty of us around, and many of us are single.  And please - by senior citizens, I mean those of us who have actually passed our 65th birthdays.  Far too often, those in their 20's think of anyone over 40 as a senior.

As someone who is the same age as your guest editor, Susan Sarandon, I see a distinct lack of attention paid to the social needs of those in my decade of life who are not celebrities.   It would be great to see that change. Thanks!

Kerry A
Kerry A

I have a complaint: I'm an avid reader of the "Undateable" section in Time Out, where Time Out sets up two strangers on a date. Well, last week's article featured a boy who wrote extremely cruel things about his date. I understand you want people to be honest, but I can hardly support someone ripping their date to shreds publicly.

Melodie D
Melodie D

Calle 13 is doing a signing today at 6pm at El Barrio Music Center in Harlem!

Arlene
Arlene

So many different kinds of events. Not your usual touristy stuff , and free. Love this site.