Get us in your inbox

Search
Brunch
Photograph: Teddy Wolff

The 10 best brunch spots in Manhattan

From classic diners to fine dining, here are our favorite breakfast and brunch restaurants in Manhattan.

Edited by
Will Gleason
Written by
Victoria Marin
&
Time Out New York contributors
Advertising

When it comes to the weekender’s favorite meal, it can be especially hard to choose from Manhattan’s plethora of options. Worry not! Let our definitive guide to Gotham’s best brunch picks lead the way (if you decide to venture out off the island, don't worry, we have strong thoughts on the best brunch in Brooklyn, too). From classic diners to upscale fine dining at some of the best restaurants in NYC, we’ve picked our favorite brunches to satisfy your weekend cravings in the city’s busiest borough.

RECOMMENDED: See more restaurants for the best brunch in NYC

Time Out Market New York
Clinton St. Baking Company
  • Restaurants
  • American
  • Lower East Side
  • price 2 of 4

New Yorkers crave a comforting breakfast and Clinton Street Baking Company is the ideal spot to satisfy even the most discerning New Yorker. The beloved Lower East Side hotspot co-owned by Chef Neil Kleinberg and DeDe Lahman offers eclectic takes on classic American food and melt-in-your-mouth pancakes well worth the two-hour weekend waits.

Best brunch in Manhattan

  • Restaurants
  • French
  • Noho
  • price 2 of 4

From the leather booths you'll sink into to the blue and white tile motif, everything in this Noho café is well thought out to creat the ultimate bistrot from Andrew Carmellini—the man behind perpetually crowded downtown spots the Dutch and Locanda Verde. The brunch menu offers everything from more indulgent classics like their croque madame or a brisket burger comté (translation: drenched in rich melty cheese), to a lighter niçoise salad or lemon ricotta pancakes. Pro tip: save room for their pastries.

  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary American
  • Union Square
  • price 2 of 4

If you're looking for the brunch spot where you can enjoy yourself, without overindulging, this is the place. Though the extensive brunch menu does include a hefty cheeseburger and buttermilk pancakes, more calorie-conscious diners have ample choice in sections such as market-table small plates, like the peekytoe crab toast with lemon aioli and baked eggs with broccolini, smoked bacon, fontina and dill. And if you can't get a table, luckily you have ABC Cocina and ABCV as backups.

Advertising
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Noho
  • price 2 of 4

Roughly translating to “home away from home,” Bessou is possibly the best Japanese-style brunch available in NYC. Every dish on the menu is both vaguely familiar, yet pleasantly unique, from a shakshuka of eggs nestled in a Japanese curry and packed with blistered eggplant is served with thick-cut milk toast for ample dipping, to the banana hotcakes Foster, prepared with black sesame, black sugar syrup, and salted miso caramel ice cream.

  • Restaurants
  • Mexican
  • West Village
  • price 1 of 4

This popular West Village eatery serves a 90 minute $30 bottomless brunch (with the purchase of a entrée – think huevos rancheros and lobster Benedict) until 4pm on Sundays. Although they take reservations, be sure to book at least a week in advance as tables fill up quickly. Not that tables sitting down after 2pm will have their drinks cut off promptly at 4pm.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Soul and southern American
  • Harlem
  • price 2 of 4

Harlem staple Amy Ruth's is a true soul-food institution and a fried chicken-and-waffle paradise. The cheery, laid-back eatery serves dishes named for famous figures, many of whom have stopped by over the years. Traditionalists will love the Rev. Al Sharpton—crunchy fried chicken and waffles.

  • Restaurants
  • American
  • Chelsea
  • price 2 of 4

Nestled next to the High Line, Cookshop is perfect for seasonal, locally sourced dishes and an array of fresh cocktails. For an especially decadent brunch, order the beignets (made with ricotta from the storied DiPalo’s) AND the egg sandwich (don’t skip the pancetta if you eat meat.) If you’re imbibing, the cocktail menu is a divine mix of traditional brunch favorites like bloody Marys and seasonal specialties like the Harvest Moon, ​​made with pumpkin vodka, fall spice-infused agave, lime and ginger beer.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary American
  • Flatiron
  • price 2 of 4

A “California-inspired” ethos is behind the menu at Upland, which includes rich and decadent yet homey and simple dishes like ricotta toast with figs and salmon Benedict. Bonus: if you’re hosting or just would rather indulge at home, you can order ahead for pick up and the entire menu travels well.

  • Restaurants
  • Californian
  • Chinatown
  • price 2 of 4

At this bright Lower East Side shop, Instagram-ready, SoCal-inspired fare stays true to the healthcentric ethos from which it was born. Eat clean with frozen bowls of acai blended with nature’s sweet and creamy treats: berries, dates, and nut butter. Veggie-focused savory dishes are similarly guilt-free, like the power bowl, which is made with kale, avocado, pepitas, alfalfa and salsa over a bed of beans and rice.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Caribbean
  • East Village
  • price 2 of 4

This downtown Caribbean corner joint playing a reggae-and-dancehall soundtrack offers a brunch power hour for a mere $45 per person. Guzzle island cocktails like the Bob Marley–nodding One Love bellini (champagne, passion-fruit puree) or a boisterous, soju-based Hotstepper (spicy Bloody Mary, Scotch bonnet pepper) while feasting on West Indian–inspired platters such as breakfast roti with soft-scrambled eggs and jerk pork sausage.

  • Restaurants
  • Contemporary European
  • East Village
  • price 1 of 4

The brunch fare at this classic Ukrainian diner is worth waking up (relatively) early for. Pillow-light blintzes are a refreshing alternative to standard-issue pancakes. Those seeking something more savory can tuck into the eggs Benedict served on potato pancakes instead of English muffins. No matter what, just be sure to order a side of kielbasa with your breakfast food. You’ll never want to return to plain old sausage or bacon.

Looking for more amazing food in Manhattan?

Recommended
    You may also like
      Advertising