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Angela Hui

Angela Hui

Food & Drink Writer, Time Out London

Angela Hui is the Food & Drink writer at Time Out London and has been with the company since 2018 (on-and-off). She’s an award-winning journalist reporting on the intersection of food and culture, hospitality industry and food justice.

Bylines include the BBC, Eater, gal-dem, HuffPost, Lonely Planet, Independent, National Geographic Traveller Food, MetroRefinery29Vice, and among other publications. She’s also the associate editor of Sandwich Magazine and you can find her documenting Chinese takeaways in the UK.

Email: angela.hui@timeout.com or find out what she’s eating on Twitter and Instagram.

Articles (49)

London’s best rooftop bars

London’s best rooftop bars

From swanky City skyscrapers to informal warehouse hangouts, Londoners have always really, really loved rooftop bars. Even in the colder months, that blessed combination of wicked city views and lovely drinks ticks our collective boxes, whether it's in hippest Shoreditch or buzzing Soho and Covent Garden. Time to soak up some sunsets (perhaps while wearing a very big coat).  A lot of these places are always in high demand, so we recommend booking tables as early as you can, although some of these bars are walk-in only. Fancy a square meal high up in the air? Check out London's best rooftop restaurants. Prefer to keep your feet on the ground? Here are London’s best beer gardens.   

The best cocktail bars in London

The best cocktail bars in London

What’s the best cocktail you’ve had in London? And where did you drink it? In the capital you can find cocktails for every taste, but knowing where to look can be daunting, as there’s so much choice. This is where our ranked list of London’s best cocktail bars comes in. Here you’ll find everything from fancy hotel spots to dark and dirty speakeasies, party places to secret basements. What they all have in common is mixed drinks that will tingle your taste buds and blow your mind.  Some of these joints stick loyally to the classics – visit Dukes for a Martini you’ll never forget or Bar Termini for a Negroni as good as they come – while others experiment to create the most wildly original cocktails around. You’re guaranteed top-notch tipples whichever bar you choose from our curated list of London’s best places to drink cocktails. Sip on!

The best rooftop restaurants in London

The best rooftop restaurants in London

Want views with your food? Eat at altitude. London’s best rooftop restaurants offer the elevation you need to gaze upon our beautiful city, and top grub to enjoy while you do. Our list includes swish spots, gastropubs and even a thriving herb garden. Although dining in the clouds is best in the summer, most of these places have terraces that are open year-round, so you can catch a sunset whenever you like. Or, if you’re thirsty for the high life try London’s best rooftop bars.  RECOMMENDED: London’s best rooftop bars.

London’s best bakeries

London’s best bakeries

Whittling down the best dough in the city is no mean feat. From Asian patisseries to cronut auteurs and sourdough specialists, when it comes to bakeries, London is a goldmine. We’ve risen to the challenge and eaten our way through the lot to round up London’s yeasty royalty. Why not pair your pastry goodies with a hot drink at one of the best cafĂ©s and coffee shops in London?

The best bottomless brunches in London

The best bottomless brunches in London

Drinking before noon is generally seen as ‘a bad thing’. But what if said boozing is done inside a fashionable London restaurant and accompanied by eggs, sourdough loaves and artisan coffee? In that case we call it a bottomless brunch and it’s entirely acceptable.  In London, you’ll find bottomless bubbles and Bloody Marys, obviously, but you can also go beyond the tried-and-tested and experiment with infinite beer or endless streams of rosĂ©. The food doesn’t have to be straightforward breakfast stuff either. Brunch can be anything from bao to barbecue, Turkish to Japanese. What’s more, the majority of these bottomless brunches go on well into the pm, so you don’t need to get up early to get involved. Time to go hard then go home! Or, you could just stick to regular old brunch. Video: Check out this list of five fab bottomless brunches in London RECOMMENDED: Find more great breakfasts in London. Into bargains? Check out these bottomless offers.

The best restaurants in London you should be booking

The best restaurants in London you should be booking

You can’t get bored of eating out in London. This city’s restaurant scene is a rich tapestry of different cuisines and flavours. From the family-run neighbourhood Thai joint that’s been around for years to the Michelin-starred grandee where you can sit at a counter and watch genius chefs at work, London’s restaurants are diverse, creative and always exciting.  Being taken care of at a restaurant is a real privilege, and as we tuck into our freshly made pasta with a glass of natural wine or fiery curry with a cold beer, it’s easy to forget about the people who cook for and serve us. That’s why we want to celebrate and shine a light on the capital’s hospitality industry with our 2022 Best Restaurants list.  On it are the places that we go back to again and again. There are old favourites like St John, with its always-excellent roast bone marrow and parsley salad, and Mandarin Kitchen, whose signature lobster egg noodles never get old. Also included are the new haunts that we’ve fallen in love with at first bite, such as Planque, a haven for wine lovers with an ever-changing menu of French food, and our surprise Number One, a certain modern West African restaurant.  Whether it’s a place with communal outdoor tables where you wolf down a taco, salsa dribbling down your arm, or a swanky fine-dining joint for a four-course dinner, everywhere on our list serves up incredible food that you won’t forget. This is your guide to eating out in the capital in 2022. Now tuck in.

London’s best restaurants for outdoor dining

London’s best restaurants for outdoor dining

Spring has finally sprung and outdoor dining in the city is officially back on the cards. Soak up that all-important vitamin D while you eat at London’s best restaurants that have some of the best rooftops views and terraces that will make you feel like you’re on holiday. Whether you’re in the mood to take bottomless brunches outside or have spaghetti in the sun and snack on schnitzel by starlight, our list has you covered. 

London’s best Irish bars and pubs

London’s best Irish bars and pubs

In theory, if not in practice, anyone can pour a pint of Guinness. But if you're looking for a London pub that's evangelical about how it serves the black stuff, especially ahead of upcoming St Patrick's Day, check out one that’s Irish-owned. We've put together a selection of other Irish pubs; from old-fashioned boozers honouring Gaelic traditions and young, cool London bars stocking Irish ales and whiskies. At some, you’ll find the country’s music, food and even dancing; at others, you’ll get served Thai food with your Irish booze. So get stuck into the craic: here’s a round-up the 20 best Irish pubs and bars in London.

The best new restaurants in London

The best new restaurants in London

Every week, a frankly stupid amount of brilliant new restaurants, cafés and street food joints arrive in London. Which makes whittling a shortlist of best newbies down to manageable size a serious challenge. But here it is. The very best new restaurants in the capital. Go forth and eat. RECOMMENDED: The 100 best restaurants in London

Michelin-starred restaurants in London

Michelin-starred restaurants in London

The yearly unveiling of the Michelin Guide’s ‘Great Britain and Ireland’ edition is always big news in the food-nerd world. For very good reason, too – London’s one of the top-ranked cities in the world for fine dining. And it’s got plenty of those coveted stars. While Michelin’s expertise on expensive, upmarket restaurants is well known, the Michelin Guide has also been criticised for its lack of relevance to ordinary diners. Conspicuous by their absence are London’s more affordable places to eat. The 2022 list saw restaurants led by IrĂ© Hassan-Odukale and Jeremy Chan at Ikoyi and The Clove Club, but no new full three stars. The canny eater, it should be said, should consider aiming at the board’s Bib Gourmand list – a kind of ‘highly commended’ round-up that doesn’t require the formal fripperies of the star system. Really, it’s where the most exciting stuff lies – newcomers on the list this year include Time Out faves Evelyn’s Table and Trivet, and plenty more places that also appear in our meticulously compiled list of the best restaurants in London. Still, if you’re feeling flush, read on to find all London restaurants with a Michelin star (or three). RECOMMENDED: The 100 best restaurants in London. 

London’s best restaurants for pancakes

London’s best restaurants for pancakes

Pancakes are a Shrove Tuesday standard, but what if you can’t be bothered to FIY (flip it yourself)? Eat out, of course! We’ve rounded up the best places for pancakes in town. In London, there’s more to these carb-tastic delights than sugar and lemon. From meaty, cheese-oozing galettes to American-style delights at brunch and decadent crĂȘpes for dessert, these are the best pancakes in London – for the big day (March 1) and beyond. 

Pancake Day in London

Pancake Day in London

Have your frying pans at the ready because Pancake Day is just around the corner. In 2022, Shrove Tuesday falls on Tuesday March 1. While you can stick to your own trad recipe, London's best restaurants will be going flipping mad for Pancake Day this year. Here's how to have a blast with these memorable ways to spend Pancake Day in London – from specialist restaurants to Time Out’s foolproof pancake recipe and of course all the kits you can have delivered to make the day even more delicious. What is Pancake Day? Shrove Tuesday marks the last day before Lent, traditionally a period of abstinence, associated with clearing your cupboards of things like sugar, fat and eggs. It's known as Pancake Day because it represents a good opportunity to use up such ingredients. Easy peasy lemon squeezy.  When is Pancake Day? Pancake Day takes place 47 days before Easter Sunday. Because the date of Easter Sunday is dictated by the cycles of the moon, Pancake Day can occur anytime between February 3 and March 9. This year's batter action takes place on Tuesday March 1 2022. RECOMMENDED: More great things to do in London this February

Listings and reviews (23)

Apricity

Apricity

3 out of 5 stars

On my Friday evening visit, I went looking for Apricity, a new socially conscious restaurant in Mayfair. Instead, Citymapper failed me and I ended up at a fertility clinic also called Apricity five minutes down the road.  The two share the same name and they also share the beginnings of parenthood. Chef-owner Chantelle Nicholson’s new restaurant baby has been years in the making (after being delayed thanks to something or other). She’s known for her zero-waste approach to cooking and has previously received a Green Michelin Star (an honour for sustainability) for her work at her former restaurant Tredwells.  When I finally find the right Apricity, I discover that this emphasis on sustainability is also promoted in the interior. The walls are bare plastered; chairs are made from old Coca-Cola bottles; oyster shells are crafted into moon-like light pendants; pothos and ivy plants hang down from the ceiling, giving the airy space a distressed-chic (or late ’00s Dalston squat party) look.  The menu Nicholson has put together with head chef Eve Seemann follows the seasons and naturally changes a lot. Things kicked off with a plate of cuttlefish with chilli cherry tomatoes and smoked emulsion, and aubergine with zhoug and roasted almond butter. Both were punchy, crunchy and creamy – texturally triumphant and moreish. The move is to make sure you order Flor sourdough to mop up the saucy remains. A lettuce head followed, with dainty pieces of dehydrated tomatoes, blobs of aioli and s

Goddard & Gibbs

Goddard & Gibbs

3 out of 5 stars

Locally sourced and sustainable British seafood is the hot ticket at Goddard & Gibbs at the 100 Shoreditch Hotel, a new seafood restaurant that’s headed by chef Thomas Moore (formerly of Ormer in Mayfair) replacing the old Hoi Polloi restaurant inside Ace Hotel.  On my Friday evening visit, the place was packed with fashion types in shredded Balenciaga hoodies wearing sunglasses indoors, families and first dates all enthusiastically digging into gigantic sharing seafood platters and towering piles of oysters. A good sign.  We’re in Shoreditch, so the interiors are fancy. Think: terrazzo tables, big paper lamps, dark wood panelling and leather banquettes. Plus a massive yellow wooden sculptural showpiece in the centre of the dining room that wouldn’t look out of place in the town of Bedrock. We started with a cracking plate of fried calamari rings that were light, bronzed and crunchy, tinged with the flavour of lemon and paired with a creamy aioli dip that didn’t hold back on the garlic. I could’ve easily eaten another plate of this holiday-inducing squid all by myself.  Sadly, the same couldn’t be said for the rustic seafood stew with mussels and chorizo. It had a nice kick to it, but it was one-note and forgettable. As for the emblematic dish? Enter the hefty roasted skate wing. It was a proper whopper that barely fitted my plate and was definitely made for sharing (or for one very hungry person). The delicately sweet flesh was perfectly seasoned with salt and pepper and do

Lisboeta

Lisboeta

4 out of 5 stars

Recently, it seems that everyone wants to either a) go on holiday to Lisbon or b) move to Lisbon. But while we’re making those grand plans, we can get a slice of sweet Portuguese life right here in London. Enter: Lisboeta.  Portuguese chef Nuno Mendes, best known for his work at Michelin-starred Chiltern Firehouse, has returned to the kitchen with a swanky new restaurant that celebrates his homeland’s cuisine. On the ground floor, there’s a long counter bar with warm wooden accents and a big open-plan kitchen where all the fire action happens. We were sat on the more relaxed upper floor. There was a frame wall with teal wood panelling and a shelf just for plants. Basically, it was a Pinterest interiors board come to life. We kicked off the meal with some snacks and charcuterie: a board of beautifully marbled, melt-in-the-mouth copita slices that belonged in the Tate; two dainty, delectable pieces of morcela blood sausage and razor clam on toast; and a Goan-spiced pork pie that was a flaky, crumbly beauty, but could’ve done with more heat. But so far so good.  I’m told that the petiscos – seasonal Portuguese-style small sharing plates – are created from produce brought straight from the seas and shores of Portugal. The bacalhau (salt cod) was adorned with a comical number of shoestring fries, which made me giddy like a schoolchild. The fish was mixed with hunks of slowly braised caramelised onion that contributed to the hearty and warming nature of the dish, with the mountain

CĂ©dric Grolet at The Berkeley

CĂ©dric Grolet at The Berkeley

3 out of 5 stars

Frenchman CĂ©dric Grolet is a big deal. He’s one of the world’s best pĂątissiers (he won the title of Best Pastry Chef in 2018). He has more than 2 million Instagram followers and is famous for creating trompe l’oeil-style desserts that look like fruit (sometimes nuts and flowers, too). Now, he’s hopped across the Channel to open his first pĂątisserie outside France with this ambitious cafĂ© and high-end ‘pastry lab’ at The Berkeley Hotel. Since it opened in February, there have been endless queues and people going mad over it on social media.  On my Monday-morning visit, I was greeted by five pastries that looked like works of art displayed in their own glass cloche. It reminded me of the enchanted rose from ‘Beauty and the Beast’, but with less wilted flower and more buttery, flaky goodness. I took a seat on one of the eight pink stools at the clinically white polished steel counter for my two-hour, seven-course pastry tasting menu. It's direct from the oven and straight to you. Sadly, there was no sign of Grolet himself in action, but his team of pastry chefs were on hand to explain ingredients and techniques. ‘We’re proud of the fact that there’s no fridge here,’ my pastry chef said, handing me my first plate. ‘It's direct from the oven and straight to you.’  The menu started with a bang: a delicate and intricate web-like croissant cracker with a luxurious Peruvian dark-chocolate swirl that felt properly decadent, both bitter and sweet. It was swiftly followed by a transcend

Chuan Royal China

Chuan Royal China

3 out of 5 stars

While we have plenty of affordable options for Chinese food in Chinatown, the playing field for higher-end versions of the cuisine is wide open. Enter the Royal China Group. Its original Baker Street branch is an institution, and it has other successful restaurants across the city. This new Chinatown site quietly opened at the tail-end of last year, when London was in the grip of Omicron. After that rocky start, things seemed to have picked up by my February Wednesday evening visit: the restaurant’s vibrant red dining room, divided up by expensive-looking lotus-and-crane screens and displaying antique Chinese porcelain, was bustling. We kicked things off with a quarter portion of crispy aromatic roast duck. A glossy ruby-coloured fowl glistened under the light on our table and, just from picking up a piece with chopsticks, I could tell how amazingly juicy it was: the glorious dripping oozed out. To accompany, gai lan (Chinese broccoli) covered in crispy garlic bits, which provided a healthy, crunchy counterpoint to the fatty, succulent meat. Happily, the dessert mochi, liberally smothered with peanut powder, was in a different league. The mains, however, were not so good. The fried king prawns and vegetables could have been fresher and the fried tapioca bird’s nest they were served in was hard and inedible. I was equally disappointed with the gigantic portion of Fukien egg-fried rice because it tasted like it was boiled and had never seen any stir-fry wok action. Its diced

Zahter

Zahter

4 out of 5 stars

Zahter is a properly gorgeous restaurant. It’s full of artistic touches, like exposed brick, industrial beams, brass lamps and a blue-tiled, marble-topped chef’s counter that surrounds a central, flickering charcoal oven. When I visited with a friend, all of this chicness and elegance was shown to us but then cruelly snatched away as we were ushered past the main dining area on the ground floor and taken upstairs to a basic-looking mezzanine level. I peered over the glass fence next to our table to look down on the diners below. I longed to be closer to the flames, the smoke and the action. Putting aside the seating envy, we focused on the torrent of hot and cold mezze plates, adorned with wood-fired Turkish goodies, that quickly arrived at our table. The kofte kibbeh (stuffed meatball) served with toasted pine nuts, tahini and labneh, was a robust, comforting and texturally smart dish, but it was a bit small to justify its hefty £18 price tag. The tomato-and-cucumber salad with walnuts and urfa chilli was remarkably punchy and zingy. And an ovenware dish of charred tiger prawns swimming in a sizzling crimson pool of aleppo pepper garlic butter was begging for a side order of freshly grilled pide bread to mop up all the sauce. The acidic, sweet and tangy pomegranate sauce was striking, and electrified the charred chicken Next, we were presented with a plate of greens, and initially thought we had been given the wrong main sharing platter. ‘Where’s the chicken?’ my pal asked,

Sucre

Sucre

4 out of 5 stars

‘This is a terrible restaurant! Don’t bother!’  Two women pushed me out of the way and slammed the front door behind them.  Awkwardness filled the air; everyone in the queue shot each other a look and the woman manning the cloakroom apologised profusely.  ‘I’m so sorry about that, we’re extremely busy and very understaffed for a Thursday evening.’   It only made me more determined to stick around and try the food for myself. Surely, it couldn’t be that bad? I was led through a small bar and into the dining room and my jaw hit the floor.  This new Soho Latin American bar and restaurant is the brainchild of Argentina’s hottest duo. Bartender Renato ‘Tato’ Giovannoni of Florería Atlántico (currently ranked number seven in the World’s 50 Best Bars) is in charge of the basement live-music bar Abajo directly beneath Sucre and executive chef Fernando Trocca oversees all things food. Together, they’ve taken over the London College of Music’s former home and this revamped ex-concert hall is truly a sight to behold. On one end, an open kitchen is flanked by opulent floor-to-ceiling marble columns, booths line the right-hand wall while gorgeous chandeliers dominate the ceiling. On closer inspection, I found they were made from loads of cut-glass decanters so you feel like you’re inside one of Yayoi Kasuma’s infinity mirror rooms. This stunning fairytale-esque dining room looked straight out of a film set and it could make other dining rooms pale in comparison from now on.  My friend and

Din Tai Fung Selfridges

Din Tai Fung Selfridges

3 out of 5 stars

The celebrated Taiwanese restaurant chain Din Tai Fung, which has more than 170 restaurants worldwide, opened its first European venture in Covent Garden in December 2018 and has now landed in Selfridges. A word of warning: don’t get lost meandering through the maze of designer bags and shoes in the department store, desperately looking for the restaurant, on an empty stomach because you will curse and you will get hangry.  Eventually, I found my way to the fourth-floor dining room and was welcomed by a mesmerising view of the kitchen through a giant glass window. I watched the team of dumpling-makers roll and pleat the restaurant’s signature 18-fold xiao long bao (steamed pork-soup dumplings) with speed and precision. My navigation and hunger woes immediately melted away. The restaurant is a sleek, minimal and modern space with a terrazzo floor, rattan walls and a big, wooden tree centrepiece with red pockets hanging off it ready for Chinese New Year. But it’s part of Selfridges’ shiny new ‘dining complex’, which means we could see other outlets – Pizza Pilgrims, EL&N CafĂ© – from our table. It felt like we were sitting in a soulless food court.  The menu here is a cut-down version of the Covent Garden branch’s offering. We started with a trio of cold appetisers: crunchy wood ear mushrooms swimming in a sharp ginger-and-vinegar dressing; vibrant, fresh green beans with diced pork and prawn; and a poached Shanghainese drunken chicken that tasted as silky as satin sheets. Bliss

Warehouse

Warehouse

3 out of 5 stars

‘We’ve tried to make it cosy, but sexy,’ says Paul van Zyl, chief creative officer of The Conduit members’ club, as he spots me looking round from my seat trying to take in the busy interiors of its new public restaurant Warehouse.  But nothing about this place screams sexy at all. Cosy? Yes, but it felt a bit too try-hard. There’s a tapestry from Swaziland, the tiles that frame the kitchen hatch are from South Africa and the bright turquoise-blue walls on your way to the toilets are adorned with a Durban dish collection. The room’s a loud and lively mix of colours and textures, with hanging woven lampshades, mismatched wooden chairs, gigantic plants and stone floors. I understand they’re trying to support craftspeople and use repurposed and vintage materials, but there’s a lot going on. It felt very jarring and incongruous to what was being served. As for the food, ex-head chef of zero-waste restaurant Silo Brendan Eades brings his environmental credentials to the table. The seasonally fluctuating menu has a focus on locally sourced ingredients from artisan suppliers and producers. I started with a refreshing, clean-tasting, luminous green Gimlet cocktail made with foraged sea herbs. With every sip I was reminded of the breezy, salty, sea air with hints of floral juniper botanics. My pal tried a pink drink made with whisky, foraged and fermented sloe berries and spent coffee grounds: a warming, fruity and punchy concoction. Seriously sublime tipples that were great for whett

The Barbary Next Door

The Barbary Next Door

4 out of 5 stars

‘Is this The Barbary?’  Two customers were standing at the front of Neal’s Yard’s freshest restaurant, looking puzzled.  ‘No, this is the new place, The Barbary Next Door,’ said general manager James Steel. He pointed to his left. ‘The Barbary is next door.’  I must have watched this same moment play out at least six times over the course of my dinner there. The Barbary Next Door has opened in the space where the Palomar-owned Jacob the Angel coffee shop used to call home. (RIP one of my favourite workspaces in central London.) Sitting adjacent to its sibling restaurant, it shares the same bar-counter dining concept as the original, but with half the space and a tiny open kitchen. Its simple pared-back interior, with white exposed-brick walls and a big mirror opposite the counter, gives the illusion of a bigger space. Wine bottles and glasses hang from the ceiling. For such a small sliver of a restaurant, the space is utilised in a very smart way. The place had barely been open for a week when I visited and it was already booked out. At one point during our Tuesday-evening trip, a horde of people all arrived at once and it felt very claustrophobic, so it might not be the best place for the Covid-wary. (There is one table outside in the courtyard for those who still prefer outdoor dining.) The candlelit ambience was a little too dark and, on the playlist, upbeat jazz instrumentals flowed into a rather interesting and creepingly loud version of Richard Strauss’s ‘Also Sprach Z

Rita’s

Rita’s

3 out of 5 stars

Chances are you’ve probably heard of Rita’s: co-owners Gabriel Pryce and Missy Flynn have been around the block for a decade. We’ve seen Rita’s here, there and everywhere in various guises, from a neighbourhood pop-up in Dalston to the sandwich-centred Bodega Rita’s in Coal Drops Yard. And now? They’ve made themselves at home on a plot of prime real estate in Soho bang opposite Andrew Edmunds.  On our Thursday evening visit, the place had barely been open for a week and it was already packed out with fashion types, after-work suits and late-night Soho revellers. We could see it all unfold from our counter window seats up-front: it’s a place to see and be seen. Interiors-wise it’s all super-cosy with diner-style red leather booths, wood furnishings, a rustic Mexican tiled bar and even a much-coveted central London enclosed garden space out back. Things started with a trio of nostalgic starters that transported us back to happier, simpler times. The deliberately messy tear-and-share garlic bread that looked like a puffy mushroom pillow was a tad on the doughy side, but all was forgiven thanks to the oozing herb-butter topping, which contained so much garlic that you’re guaranteed no vampires will come within a five-mile radius of you. So brilliant, we immediately wanted another round, but I’ve learnt not to get too excited and fill up on bread. It was swiftly followed by a plate of crackly potato explosions, essentially chunky loaded potato skins, but far, far superior to the d

Ekstedt at the Yard

Ekstedt at the Yard

4 out of 5 stars

Men are here! We make fire! Cook meat! That’s the general vibe of the place. Not in a literal caveman sense, but chef Niklas Ekstedt is a big name in Sweden for his signature ‘old Nordic’ analogue cooking techniques at his Michelin-starred restaurant in Stockholm. His long-awaited and much-hyped UK outpost plans to do the same and relies entirely on wood-fired cooking, with no electricity or gas. It’s housed in one of London’s most famous landmarks, Great Scotland Yard, which is neither in Scotland nor a yard, but has been recently renovated as a luxury hotel, part of the Hyatt collection. When you enter the former police headquarters you have to walk through an opulent white hallway that doubles up as a mini-exhibition showcasing police records and memorabilia preserved in glass boxes, complete with a rogues gallery. I have to admit, it’s a beautiful space with a lot of complex history, but let’s focus on the food here. The long corridor eventually leads through to Ekstedt’s lair – a very masculine Scandi dining room featuring a big exposed brick wall, lots of black hardware and bouquets of dried sage dangling from the vaulted ceiling.  For indecisive types (me), who panic when it’s their turn to order and they still haven’t made their mind up yet, you’re in luck. There are only two options here. Either the seven-course tasting menu for £135 or the three-course one for £75, with the option to add a wine pairing or a kombucha pairing (a somm-bucha, if you will), which is a re

News (123)

Your three-step guide to going alcohol-free in London

Your three-step guide to going alcohol-free in London

Alcohol has long been seen as an essential wingman for a good night out, but what if we told you that really didn’t need to be the case anymore? Non-drinkers have come a long way from only being able to wet their whistle with a sticky J2O, a glass of Coke or an overly-sweet spirit imitation. London’s innovative restaurateurs and bartenders are now gladly catering for booze-avoiders all year round and it’s not just a faddy trend, it’s here to stay. In fact, there are now so many low and no booze options that it’s hard to know where to start. Whether you’re laying off the booze for good, cutting down with mindful drinking, or dipping your toes into the sober curious lifestyle – we’ve pulled together a guide to getting to know the drinks scene.  Photograph: Haydon Perrior Beginner: get to know cool craft low-ABV brews If you’re new to not-drinking your first port of call should be Fugitive Motel bar in Bethnal Green. The all-day bar and kitchen thoughtfully incorporates progressive brews into its drinks menu rather than making them an afterthought. It dedicates at least one draught craft beer line to showcasing different new low-ABV and no alcohol beers, as well as selling takeaway cans and doing delivery around the city.  ‘Alcohol-free craft beer sales have really grown over the summer. Londoners are living at 100-miles per hour in both work and play. I honestly think drinkers weigh up their options – asking themselves ‘have I got time for a hangover?’’ David Burgess co-fou

Where to drink the best cocktails in London for World Cocktail Day

Where to drink the best cocktails in London for World Cocktail Day

Are you a half glass empty or a half glass full type person? Either way, you should have something delicious in your hand, at some point this evening. It is, after all, World Cocktail Day. Whatever your drinking desires, London will have a cocktail for you. From mood-boosting super drinks to classic vodka martinis, we think this lot of cracking concoctions are top-notch and perfect for sipping.  Photograph: Anton Rodriguez The Frothy Boi at Sweeties  Happy Hour? Happy days. The new 10th-floor bar Sweeties at the Standard Hotel in King’s Cross offers two drinks for £20 available everyday from 5pm-7pm (including Fridays and Saturdays). Try a range of natural mood-boosting cocktails (think: Goop, but less spenny) created in collaboration with award-winning mixologists Jack Sotti and Todd Austin. Try the pink Frothy Boi (pictured above) that’s made with lacto-rhubarb, gin, raspberry, pink pepper and gut-friendly fermented amazake oats against the backdrop of the bar's floor-to-ceiling views of the London skyline. 10th Floor, 10 Argyle St, WC1H 8EG View this post on Instagram A post shared by Bar + RTD Cocktails (@tayer_elementary) Frozen Yuzu Margarita at Tāyer + Elementary We’re going to call it. This frozen yuzu margarita from Tāyer + Elementary is going to be the drink of the summer. It might look like an adult slush puppy, but it tastes nothing like the hopped-up sickly-sweet stuff we grew up drinking. It’s a refreshing, citrusy and electrifying

Ultra-viral snack-seller Bubblewrap is doing a buy-one-get-one-free this weekend

Ultra-viral snack-seller Bubblewrap is doing a buy-one-get-one-free this weekend

Remember that waffle dessert that broke the internet and caused crazy queues in Chinatown? Well, Bubblewrap is still going strong and it’s opening a new location inside Spitalfields Market. To celebrate, it’s offering a buy-one-get-one-free offer from now until the end of this weekend (May 5-8).  The indulgent Insta-famous dessert known for its Hong Kong-style bobbly, spherical homemade egg waffle, which you can top with fresh gelato, mochi, fruit, cream, chocolate, sauce and biscuits, will be joining the likes of other well-known street food offerings such as Dumpling Shack, Yum Bun and Bleecker Burger. This kiosk will be takeaway-only and hungry Londoners can choose from three waffle types, six homemade gelato flavours, 14 toppings and nine sauces. This site will be the first pilot franchise as Bubblewrap has plans to expand across the UK and ramp up expansion with 25 new stores opening over the next five years. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Bubblewrap Waffle (@bubblewraplondon) Bring your well-manicured friends, get ‘gramming and stuff your face with melt-in-the-mouth crisp and fluffy homemade egg waffles. London’s dessert obsession is still going strong and this place is set to be a wrapper’s delight. Bubblewrap, Spitalfields Market, Brushfield St, E1 6AA Discover more things to do in Spitalfields with our area guide Sugar fix not quite sated? Check out our list of London’s best bakeries.

Meet the chef behind Time Out’s best London restaurant of 2022

Meet the chef behind Time Out’s best London restaurant of 2022

For Time Out’s 2022 best restaurants issue, our Food & Drink Editor Angela Hui meets JokĂ© Bakare, chef-owner of Brixton Market’s Chishuru  What’s your most popular dish?‘Mimri oku, which is a spicy broth that reminds me of my grandad. I grew up in Nigeria and we’d travel across the country to see him. We’d always be greeted with a pot of murky-looking stock bubbling away on an open fire with chopped up vegetables, yams, plantains and fermented fish. This dish packs a punch – it’s layered with complex flavours.’ Best thing you’ve cooked this year?‘Omoebe, which translates as “black soup” and is native to the Edo state in south Nigeria. We blacken ground leafy vegetables and alliums on the grill and cook it down. We use a range of herbs: scent leaves, thai basil, uziza leaves and utazi leaves. You get aromatics from the basil, pepperiness from the uziza and a slight bitterness from the utazi.’ Who is London’s most exciting chef?‘I love the inventiveness of Seb Myers’s food at Planque. I’m not sure if it’s still on the menu because it changes all the time, but the calf’s brain with braised pine nuts dish stuck with me – it reminded me of the braised nuts of Nigerian soups. It’s something different to what I’m used to eating, but it speaks to my heart.’ What’s the most unexpected thing that’s happened since you opened Chishuru?‘To be honest, it’s the way we’ve been accepted. I never thought we’d be here this long. People have embraced our cuisine. It’s emotional for me, because f

The mystery of London’s ‘dark kitchens’

The mystery of London’s ‘dark kitchens’

When I went to collect my order from a Chinese takeaway in east London, I wasn’t expecting to find a pristine production line and speakers blasting noughties dance tunes. And I definitely wasn’t expecting to get lost in a maze of industrial units, hidden under the railway arches near a Zone 2 tube station.  Google Maps told me: ‘You’ve arrived at your destination’, but all I saw was a commercial wheelie bin overflowing with flattened cardboard boxes and a stream of bright orange Just Eat drivers going in and out of a door with no signage.  I followed suit and sheepishly entered: volcanic heat smacked me in the face. The stench of deep fryer oil and sweet and sour assured me it was the right place, but it was a long way from any takeaway I’d ever seen. Everything felt so calm, serene and ordered. Where was the shouting in the kitchen? Where was the chaos dealing with drunken late-night customers? A member of staff nodded at me and got out his phone to play DJ Sammy’s ‘Heaven’ through the speakers, followed by an intense Chinese opera dance mix. A machine was endlessly churning out receipts for online orders and brown paper bags were lined up under heat lamps, ready to go. Within minutes, I was handed my order of ribs, sweet and sour pork, prawn toast and spring rolls, ready to take home.  This was a ‘dark kitchen’, a faceless, unacknowledged space catering only for the takeaway and delivery crowd. Dark kitchens, ghost kitchens, cloud kitchens, virtual kitchens: whatever you li

Brixton Market’s Chishuru named Time Out’s best restaurant of 2022

Brixton Market’s Chishuru named Time Out’s best restaurant of 2022

The last time we published our annual Best Restaurants list was in November 2019. Since then, London’s hospitality venues have been through a lot. That’s why we're pleased to announce that our top 50 rundown is back for 2022 – and better than ever. This year’s number one spot has gone to Chishuru, a West African neighbourhood restaurant in Brixton that’s unique, exciting and, most importantly, serves up really delicious food.   Nigerian-born chef-owner AdejokĂ© ‘Joké’ Bakare opened the space in September 2020 in the midst of the pandemic’s dreaded tier system. Before that she was hosting dinner parties and supper clubs – it was only after winning the Brixton Kitchen competition in 2019 that she was able to start her own restaurant. It’s not been an easy ride since opening, but Bakare and her team have developed a loyal following. Chishuru has become a local favourite, known for its peach-coloured intimate dining room and welcoming atmosphere. A large part of what makes this place so great is down to Bakare herself. Diners can watch her at work in the open-plan kitchen and she’ll happily bring out dishes to tables, give customers insight into the stories behind her food and discuss cooking techniques. Photograph: Jess Hand Speaking about being Time Out’s Best Restaurant of 2022, Bakare said: ‘The recognition makes us feel so special. We opened at a time of great uncertainty, thus we’ve never known “normal”. This makes it worthwhile.’ She added: ‘My restaurant is a very perso

Hoko to open a Hong Kong french-toast and milk-tea café kiosk in Hackney

Hoko to open a Hong Kong french-toast and milk-tea café kiosk in Hackney

Those of you who love to start the day with a cuppa and slice of toast are in luck because a new tea-and-toast cafĂ©-kiosk is coming to town. But this isn’t your regular cup of tea or toast, oh no. Hoko got known for selling silky, sweet Hong Kong milk tea pouches online during lockdown and has been quietly making a name for itself since. Now it’s launching a proper bricks-and-mortar venue at Westgate Street Market opposite London Fields on March 26, which will be open every Saturday.  Photograph: Hoko The menu will include six types of Hong Kong-style french toast made with deep-fried milk bread, including the Golden Yolk (salted egg yolk, cream cheese and shredded ‘pork floss’); soy mochi (rice mochi, soy sauce, mirin sake and nori); the 3.15pm (ham, cheese and honey); the Hong Kong Classic (peanut butter, maple syrup and butter); the Matcha (uji matcha lava and powder with whipped mascarpone); and the Yuen Yeung (a Hong Kong speciality made from half milk tea and half espresso, with condensed milk).  They’ll be joining other traders including the likes of Bun House, Wingnut Wines and Calamari Canteen. This is certainly the place to be if you want to switch up your weekend brunch game.  London Fields Primary School, Westgate St, E8 3RU. Discover more things to do in east London. Find more street food markets and food halls.

Shrimp boil experts Decatur are opening a prep kitchen in Leyton

Shrimp boil experts Decatur are opening a prep kitchen in Leyton

Shrimp! Boil! IRL! That’s right, you heard correctly. The meal kit kings Decatur, famous for their shrimp boils that single-handedly kept us all going throughout lockdown, has finally found a permanent home. To celebrate they’re throwing a moving in party this Saturday on March 26 from noon until 5pm.  Founder Tom Browne says it’s not going to be a fully-functioning restaurant (watch this space) but their new railway arch prep kitchen will give them the space to focus on doing other Louisiana and Cajun dishes, as well as upping production on meal kits and spice blends for retail.  View this post on Instagram A post shared by Decatur (@decaturlondon) The party itself is going to be low-key and it’s a rock up if you feel like it basis. While there won’t actually be any shrimp boil there will be plenty of other southern delights such as duck and Andouille sausage gumbo, veggie and fried chicken biscuits, as well as, beers from nearby local brewery Gravity Well. Come bask in the sun and come hungry. Arch 144 Tillbury Road, Leyton, E10 6RE Find out how Decatur makes their fragrant and spicy shrimp boil. Discover more in Leyton through the eyes of a clued up local.

Honey and Co. are opening a new restaurant in Bloomsbury

Honey and Co. are opening a new restaurant in Bloomsbury

Still sad about the news of the beloved Middle Eastern restaurant Honey and Co. closing its original site after ten years? Well, turn that frown upside down as founders Itamar Srulovich and Sarit Packer have just announced they’re moving to Bloomsbury soon (the exact opening date is yet to be confirmed). They are taking over number 54, which formerly housed Spanish restaurant Cigala (ex-Moro co-founder Jake Hodges’ old place), next to cheese shop La Fromagerie. The new location promises to be bigger, with the husband-and-wife chef duo saying it will be an opportunity to do things ‘bigger and better’. The full menu hasn’t been released yet, but we can expect familiar seasonal star dishes such as falafel, slow-cooked lamb and barbecued aubergine with tahini and, of course, its famous feta and honey cheesecake for dessert.  Photograph: Patricia Niven ‘We’re bringing everything we can with us: our staff, our famous tiles, our signature dishes; plus everything we’ve learned over the last ten years,’ Packer says. ‘We’re adding more space, wine by Keeling Andrew & Co, the wine company from the guys behind Noble Rot, our new neighbours, better extraction – which our team are very excited about – and we might even put tablecloths on this time.’ Lamb’s Conduit Street is already well-known as being a go-to place for eating out in town. Honey and Co. will be joining the likes of Noble Rot, the aforementioned cheese palace La Fromagerie and legendary Italian Ciao Bella. ‘The street fee

This is what women think of the hospitality industry and how to change it for a better future

This is what women think of the hospitality industry and how to change it for a better future

Female chefs are not uncommon, but there’s still a certain fascination with what it means to be a woman in such a male-dominated landscape and hierarchical environment.  According to data gathered between 2009-17 by the Office for National Statistics, only 17 percent of chef positions in the UK are held by women. They’ve been cooking professionally for millennia and in the restaurant industry, but the metrics by which restaurants are judged still don’t reflect that. In honour of this year’s International Women’s Day on March 8, we asked some of the most influential women in food and drink to weigh in on what change they’d like to see, re the industry’s gender imbalance, how they’ve learned to overcome challenges and what they would change to bring about a better future.  Photograph: Adriana Cavita Adriana Cavita, chef-patron at the soon-to-be-opened Cavita in Marylebone ‘As time goes on, it becomes more and more common to have female chefs leading kitchens and creating beautiful food, but you definitely have to work harder than a male chef to prove yourself. [Having a] private life can be very challenging and the job demands a lot of compromise. But it is very important to have confidence and keep cooking, keep making mistakes and learning from them, for ourselves and for the passion and love we feel for restaurants.’  Photograph: Esra Muslu Esra Muslu, chef and founder at Zahter in Soho ‘Even in this day and age there are still barriers in gender equity in many sectors.

Big Mamma Group is coming to Kensington

Big Mamma Group is coming to Kensington

Big Mamma Group is going west. They’re the brains behind those fabulously OTT and kitschy restaurants Gloria in Shoreditch, Fitzrovia’s Circolo Popolare, and most recently Ave Mario in Covent Garden. They’re the guys who believe more is more and have tried to capture the Sicilian coast sunshine to the heart of Fitzrovia by lining their walls with 20,000 liquor bottles and brought the Amalfi Coast to east London with their flower-covered ceilings. Yeah, those guys. Hot Dinners reported that the potential fourth site is taking over an old bank on west London’s High Street Kensington. Their new branch will have room for 180 diners, making it a slightly smaller site and will be a similar size to the first London opening, Gloria.  In terms of food and drink, what can we expect? Well, details are currently scant, but it’s no doubt that the people who brought you the ten-layer lasagne, an epic lemon meringue pie the size of a baby and a carbonara made before your eyes within a giant wheel of pecorino cheese will go above and beyond. The maximalism restaurant is set to open sometime in 2022 and we’ll update you all when we know more details. Find London’s best pasta restaurants and slurp up the good stuff. See our picks of the best Italian restaurants in London.

Why we’re celebrating London’s takeaways this week

Why we’re celebrating London’s takeaways this week

My first job was at my parents’ Chinese takeaway in my Welsh hometown. I was eight years old and I hated it. I stank of prawns and I had to stand on a plastic stool to reach the counter to be able to serve customers. Fast forward 15 years, I moved to London and eventually, after 30 years in business, we sold the shop. Looking back, growing up above a takeaway taught me so many life lessons and it helped shape my identity. Since living in the city, I find myself going to my local Chinese takeaway every other week to support it. The Chinese woman behind the counter sneaks in a bag of free prawn crackers with my order (shout out to Wendy at Wing Wah in Leytonstone).  The world of the takeaway has been a huge part of my life, so much so that I’ve written a book about my experience growing up above one in the rural Welsh valleys. Over the years, I’ve seen a change in people’s eating habits. Gone are the days when your options for takeout were limited to just pizza or fish and chips. Now, the choices are endless, from vegan chik’n to Nepalese curries and even Michelin-starred meals. In the not-so-distant past, takeaways operated on a cash-only basis, had no digital presence and handled food delivery directly. These days, an entire ecosystem of players is involved. There are takeaway-only dark kitchens, new technology by Slerp that gives restaurants the ability run their own online ordering systems, and alternative third-party delivery services like Dishpatch and Supper have sprung