52 weeks of #ExcitingSG in 2018

We challenge you to get involved in at least one exciting activity happening around town each week for 2018

Singapore Ultra

This year, Time Out Singapore is challenging you to get more involved in your city. If there's one thing that we found out from the Time Out City Index Survey, it's that Singaporeans don't enjoy living here that much and find city life kinda bland.

But no fear – we're here to help you fall back in love with the Lion City one exciting event at a time. We're making a a year-long commitment to get you inspired by what Singapore has to offer every single week – all you have to do is make the time.

Each Monday, a special guest who's 'in' with the scene – think musicians, DJs, artists, chefs and designers – takes over this space to wax lyrical about what they love about Singapore and recommends something to eat, see, do or buy in the city. 

We also want YOU to tell us what's good in the city: share a favourite snapshot of your Singapore life – be it a music festival, foodporn, urban landscape, or even a cute stray cat – with the hashtag #ExcitingSG. Keep your eyes peeled for free treats, tickets and giveaways so you can live out your best Singapore life in 2018.

52 weeks of #ExcitingSG: the countdown

Week 21: Alfian Sa'at
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Week 21: Alfian Sa'at

Playwright Alfian Sa'at who is spearheading this year's Singapore Theatre Festival as Co-Artistic Director talks theatre with us.

Week 22: Furqan Saini
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Week 22: Furqan Saini

Renowned stylist and fashion director Furqan Saini shares his best tips to look stylish in Singapore's heat.

Week 23: Damian D'Silva
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Week 23: Damian D'Silva

We chat with chef and MasterChef Singapore judge, Damian D'Silva of Folklore, a restaurant in Singapore that specialises in heritage food. 

Week 24: The Sam Willows
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Week 24: The Sam Willows

The Sam Willows talks about their sophomore album I Know But Where, and their prep routine before taking the stage at Hyperplay.

Week 25: Ysa Yaneza
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Week 25: Ysa Yaneza

Electronic producer and singer-songwriter Ysa Yaneza talks about her latest single and the inspiration behind it.

Week 26: Angelita Teo
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Week 26: Angelita Teo

The director of the National Museum of Singapore and the festival director of this year’s Singapore Night Festival (SNF) Angelita Teo tells us what she thinks about the state of the arts in Singapore, what she’s inspired by and more on what to expect from this year’s Night Fest. 

Week 27: Nasen Thiagarajan
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Week 27: Nasen Thiagarajan

Nasen Thiagarajan, CEO of Harry's International, tells us what he thinks about the F&B scene in Singapore, where he hangs out and what gets him excited about our city. 

Week 28: DJ Koflow
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Week 28: DJ Koflow

DJ Koflow (real name Wayne Liu) gives us an insider's peek at the nightlife scene in Singapore.

Week 29: Malcolm Lee
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Week 29: Malcolm Lee

The chef-owner of Candlenut, the world's only Michelin-starred Peranakan restaurant tells us his favourite local dishes and how he'd spice them up.

Week 30: Janette Tan
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Week 30: Janette Tan

Janette Tan is a senior manager handling the race operations of the Singapore Grand Prix. Here’s what she thinks about the fast cars, multitasking and this year’s F1 race. 

Week 31: Jahan Loh
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Week 31: Jahan Loh

Contemporary artist Jahan Loh shares with us about his Singapore pop art masterpiece. 

Week 32: Anngee Neo
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Week 32: Anngee Neo

Illustrator Anngee Neo dabbles with editorial, advertorial and publication illustrations and her work appears in more places than you think. 

Week 33: Anmari Van Nieuwenhove
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Week 33: Anmari Van Nieuwenhove

We chat with the curator of the multi-concept space Telok Ayer Arts Club, Anmari Van Nieuwenhove. 

Week 34: Cedric Mendoza
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Week 34: Cedric Mendoza

Welcome to Time Out Singapore's 52 Weeks of #ExcitingSG – our commitment to showing you the best of what's going on in the city this week. Every Monday, a guest writer who's "in" with the scene shares a recommendation on what to see, eat, do or buy in the city. This week we speak to Cedric Mendoza, the head bartender of Manhattan. The bar at the Regent Singapore recently claimed the third spot on this year's World's 50 Best Bars list – making it the top dog in Asia. Here's what he thinks about the win and Singapore's drink scene. Congrats on coming in third on the World's 50 Best Bars list, how does it feel? At times, I still don't know how to respond when someone congratulates us. It is a surreal, humbling and extremely rewarding experience for such a young bar. We are proud of what we've achieved in our four years of operation, but there's still lots to learn from the veterans and big players. We will put our heads down and continue to stay grounded in this highly competitive bar scene in Singapore. Honestly, we are still letting this achievement sink in. It has been really busy at Manhattan since the award and we are focusing on our guests first, a proper celebration can come later! What do you think sets you apart from other bars around the world?Apart from our beverage programme and innovative offerings, at the heart of it all, is a dedicated team that is committed to excellence, consistency and teamwork. Everyone on the team is hungry to learn and goes the extra mile

Week 35: Audra Morrice
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Week 35: Audra Morrice

Welcome to Time Out Singapore's 52 Weeks of #ExcitingSG – our commitment to showing you the best of what's going on in the city this week. Every Monday, a guest writer who's "in" with the scene shares a recommendation on what to see, eat, do or buy in the city. This week we speak to Audra Morrice, a judge on MasterChef Singapore, which crowned its winner yesterday as well as caterer and author of My Kitchen Your Table. We find out what went on behind the scenes at the MasterChef kitchen and learn more about her thoughts on Singapore's culinary scene. What gets you excited about Singapore? The single most unique thing about Singapore is its multiculturalism that’s expressed through its cuisines. Unlike most other countries, Singapore doesn’t just have one cuisine. Traditionally, there are four cuisines based on each culture, even within those groups there are dishes that reflect different subcultures. I grew up in Singapore and was influenced not only by my own heritage but of my friends' as well. What’s even more exciting today is that everyone has been setting up shop in Singapore, resulting in a real melting pot of international flavours. Descend on this small island and you get access to the world.   What is Singapore cuisine to you? Anything from Maxwell Road Hawker Centre's roti prata and Malcolm Lee’s divine Peranakan food at Candlenut to Dave Pynt’s modern Australian barbecue at Burnt Ends and the finely crafted Cantonese cuisine at Wah Lok Cantonese Restaura

Week 36: Russell Lee
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Week 36: Russell Lee

Welcome to Time Out Singapore's 52 Weeks of #ExcitingSG – our commitment to showing you the best of what's going on in the city this week. Every Monday, a guest writer who's "in" with the scene shares a recommendation on what to see, eat, do or buy in the city. In Singapore, buildings almost touch the sky, electric cars are zooming on our expressways, cashless payments are the norm now and you can buy pizzas from a vending machine. But despite being a modern little city, we’re also quite the suckers for ghost stories, and when it comes to that, there’s no one who tells it better than Russell Lee. With 25 books under his popular series, True Singapore Ghost Stories (TSGS) he’s experienced enough to tell us about the spooky things that excite him Singapore. Hi Russell! What gets you excited about Singapore? Singapore's multicultural society is unusual. It has provided a unique canvas like nothing else in the world for my stories. Also, Singapore's rapid development — from kampungs to metropolis — has changed our behaviour, feelings and outlook. There are dislocations, cracks and stresses. But all of this is rich material for the TSGS. I view the tension between the material and the spiritual, the here-and-now and the eternal, as critical for balance in life. Why do you think Singaporeans love ghost stories so much?I have news for you — Singaporeans are discerning readers and are as fussy about their ghost stories as they are about food. They don't read just any "ghost stori

Week 37: Yeow Kai Chai
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Week 37: Yeow Kai Chai

Welcome to Time Out Singapore's 52 Weeks of #ExcitingSG – our commitment to showing you the best of what's going on in the city this week. Every Monday, a guest writer who's "in" with the scene shares a recommendation on what to see, eat, do or buy in the city. This week, we chat with Yeow Kai Chai, the Festival Director of the Singapore Writers Festival. Besides helming the literary festival for four years now, he is also a published poet, a music reviewer and a journalist. Here, he talks about his inspiration, the city's literary scene and how everyone – even non-bookworms – can enjoy the Singapore Writers Festival. Hi Kai Chai! What gets you excited about Singapore?What excites me about Singapore is the thriving literary scene, despite the contrarian factors. For one, I’m dismayed by the Singaporean sense of pragmatism when it comes to literature in schools -- fewer and fewer students are taking it as a GCE O-Level subject because it is comparatively more difficult to get As (than, say, in maths or science). Yet, at the same time, I’m more heartened by the sudden proliferation of exciting poets, fiction writers, spoken-word artists and creative non-fiction writers who have sprung up in the last few years. A certain bookseller in Tiong Bahru, in fact, told me he could sell more copies of a poetry collection than his counterpart in the UK! After all, country’s soul is articulated not just by hard, economic figures, but also by the eloquence of its creative wordsmiths. Tell

Week 38: Michael Chiang
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Week 38: Michael Chiang

Welcome to Time Out Singapore's 52 Weeks of #ExcitingSG – our commitment to showing you the best of what's going on in the city this week. Every Monday, a guest writer who's "in" with the scene shares a recommendation on what to see, eat, do or buy in the city. This week, we go backstage with Michael Chiang, the veteran playwright behind side-splitting comedies Army Daze, Beauty World and Mortal Sins, who’s reviving a past production from his playbook, Private Parts. The radical 1992 hit follows a talk-show host and his unexpected rendezvous with three transsexuals. But before you catch it from November 2 to 18 at the Drama Centre, let the stage maestro tell you what he loves about Singapore and its theatre scene. What gets you excited about Singapore?Too many things! The food, the familiarity, the pace and how accessible everything is. Honestly, I never get bored. A lot of things excite me. What inspired you to pursue playwriting? I’ve always enjoyed going to the theatre, but it wasn’t until the opportunity came up that I actually entertained the idea of writing a play. It didn’t seem that formidable – I was young and smug – so I fearlessly took the plunge. Thoughts on the performing arts scene here?Compared to when I first started out over 30 years ago, the scene is in a different stratosphere now. There’s almost too much to choose from. It’s terrific that we can boast of a constant stream of original Singapore productions as well as a strong pool of onstage and backstage

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