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Sichuan Alley
Photograph: Sichuan Alley

The best restaurants and cafés to dine alone in Singapore

Table for one, please

Fabian Loo
Written by
Fabian Loo
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No one knows you quite like… you. And that’s precisely why solo dining is great: it allows you to satisfy your cravings without dissent, save yourself from awkward mealtime conversations, and simply dine at your own pace. So for days when you just want to tune in and dine out, here’s a handy guide for restaurants and cafés to visit when you feel like taking yourself out for a meal.

RECOMMENDED: Hot new restaurants and cafés to dine at this month and the best cheap eats in Singapore

  • Restaurants
  • City Hall

If you think hotpot is supposed to be a communal dining thing, think again. Fufu Pot is rethinking the way we should be enjoying hotpot dining. At Fufu, you only need one spoon to rule them all. Serving one-set individual pots, each set comes with the ingredients picked out for you that best complements the broth. Have any allergies? Just let the staff know and they'll be happy to substitute out anything. The best part is you get the whole pot to yourself and don't have to deal with pesky double-dippers or fussy eaters. The broth comes in many different flavours like Sichuan mala, collagen, tomato, stinky tofu, Korean Army Stew and Thai-inspired white curry. 

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Geylang

It’s now possible to enjoy a barbecue party for one. Settle down at one of Yakiniku Like’s solo-dining booth, which offers individual grills to char choices cuts of meats. Hectic day ahead? The special, smokeless grill ensures that you won’t smell after lunch, and the quick service from the fast-food chain promises to deliver the food from kitchen to table within three minutes. Fill up, get out and be on your way.

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  • Restaurants
  • Marine Parade

Adjoining the largest outlet of Little Farms at Katong is a new, all-day eatery. This is also Little Farms' biggest dine-in venue to date, complete with a full-service bistro, coffee kiosk, and impressive bar counter. Grab a seat by the bar, settle down at a table for one, or snuggle up at a cosy alcove. Then, chow down on a selection of healthy mains, made using the same fresh produce found at its supermarket shelves. 

  • Restaurants
  • Sandwich shop
  • Raffles Place

This tiny, hole-in-the-wall sandwich joint by Park Bench Deli focuses on just one thing: Cubano ($16.50). It is meant as a takeaway-only concept, but solo diners can enjoy the perk of tucking into a freshly constructed sub by the table at the side eatery – all while sipping some sweetened iced Cuban coffee ($7). 

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Tiong Bahru

Japan’s highest-earning conveyor belt restaurant is now available in Singapore. Three sushi-making robots help create parcels of vineyard rice, with air pumped within each morsel to make it less dense. Over 200 varieties of sushi and side dishes are available here – including tuna ($2.20), yellowtail ($3.20), and the special roasted pork with green onion ($2.20). You won’t even need to interact with the waitstaff when ordering. Grab what you want from the lower rotating belt, or order from the iPad and have it delivered straight to your table via the top conveyor belt.

  • Restaurants
  • Raffles Place

Sichuan Alley is a wood-washed noodle bar in the CBD that serves up spicy bowls of Sichuan-style noodles. The abundance of counter seats makes it convenient to get a table for one; settle in, and slurp down handmade noodles, paired with a colourful array of spices and broth. Try dan dan noodles ($9), a classic treat of the cuisine, or get Korean-inspired shredded chicken kimchi cold noodles ($9). 

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  • Restaurants
  • Tanjong Pagar

Park Bench Deli is no longer just a tiny sandwich shop. What was previously a tiny takeaway-focused joint has since grown into a sleek all-day diner, complete with proper fixtures for a comfortable sit-down meal. We like grabbing a seat on a high stools facing the open kitchen, and chow down on a signature, hearty sandwich, such as the porchetta ($18), with hearty slices of pork and crackling stuffed between ciabatta; and spicy-smoky Italian Hero ($18) with smoked duck ham, mortadella, pepperoni, and fennel. 

 

  • Restaurants
  • Israeli
  • Tanjong Pagar

Around the world, people flock to celebrity chef Eyal Shani’s casual Israeli eatery to sample his fluffy pita, stuffed with a whole slew of ingredients. While the dine-in tables are limited, Miznon has an informal tiered seating eating area which is great for those solo or in pairs. We like the popular steak and egg ($21), with seared striploin and fried egg; juicy lamb and beef meatballs ($24) drizzled with green chilli; and ratatouille ($17) that has been cooked down to a jam-like consistency, leaving a concentrated pack of flavour.

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Sengkang

Play chef and enjoy a smokeless barbecue meal at Yakiniku-GO. This casual heartland eatery utilises an electric grill to cook up cuts of beef and chicken – all without the lingering odour. And having a personal grill means you won't need to share. Most of the sets come priced under $20, and comes with rice, soup, and a choice of salad or kimchi. Sample a wide range of affordably priced sets; the Yakiniku-GO set ($15.80) offers a sampling of beef short plate, ribeye steak, and even slices of beef tongue. 

  • Restaurants
  • Raffles Place
  • price 1 of 4

The good thing about dining in the CBD – the lunch crowd is predictable, and you can plan your mealtime accordingly. Drop by after 1.30pm – that’s when most would have returned to office – and enjoy a wholesome grain bowl filled with tasty veggies and premium meats. Customise your own bowl ($16) with choices that range from salad greens to bulgur wheat, and freshly cooked choices of toppings to go with. It’ll give you the fuel you need, without any of the food coma that comes after.

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Geylang

Most ramen places are usually solo dining-friendly, and Niku King is no exception. The bar counter is typically reserved for those dining alone, where you get to watch the kitchen staff ladle up spoonfuls of hearty broth. Choose from the regular Keisuke Ramen line-up, or order from its meat-heavy Niku King concept where fattier Tontoro pork is boiled for hours to yield a creamier, more umami soup base.

 

  • Restaurants
  • Burgers
  • Raffles Place

With just 30-seats in the restaurant, dining at Bao Boy might be challenging if you have more than one person in your dining party. When alone, grabbing a seat at the bar counter is much easier. Opened by Andrew Walsh of Cure and Butcher Boy fame, dig into the famed fried chicken and cheese Bao ($14), chased with a cocktail or two. And instead of dinner conversations, past the time by watching the chefs work their magic in the open kitchen.

Other solo dining-friendly options

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