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J.Boroski
Photograph: Courtesy J.Boroski

Hong Kong bar reviews

The newest bars, pubs and drinking spots, reviewed anonymously by our critics

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Sake Bar Ginn
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Lan Kwai Fong

Fact: sakes are for cool people. Yakuzas drink it, James Bond drinks it, and if you’ve been meaning to get in on this too, then head no further than Sake Bar Ginn – a shiny enclave dedicated to the best nihonshu from Japan. Tucked away in a small commercial building in the middle of LKF, this homey, terraced bar stocks more than 70 bottles, close to 40 of which are available in single-glass tasting pours. Don’t worry if you don’t recognise most of the names listed in the menu – Sake Bar Ginn’s founder Ayuchi Momose (a Sake Service Institute certified sommelier and instructor who also used to work at the famed Sakagura sake bar in New York) has gone to extra lengths to source lesser-known sakes from small, boutique breweries around Japan. It can be a dizzying list for first-timers, which is why the first two pages of the menu are designed like a crash course on sakes, breaking down the difference between the junmai and honjozo families (the former has no added alcohol while the latter does) before going on to categorise them by grade (determined by the percentage of sakamai rice husk that’s polished off before processing) and basic flavour profiles. But the best way to learn is by drinking (of course) and at Ginn, a sake tasting flight is the best place to begin (starts at $500 and up). The staff will happily talk guests through each drink, explaining the back stories (including how one brewery came to be named after otters) and they’ll do the ritualistic steps to help draw ou

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Sai Ying Pun

This funky little Sai Ying Pun corner spot, the latest culinary concept from the founders of Sheung Wan’s Common Ground café – twin brothers Caleb and Joshua Ng – dishes up sweet and savoury pancake ‘tapas’, paired with original cocktails. The menu is simple and creative: eight pancakes matched with cocktails, plus a handful of sides. We start with the 12H78C ($98) – that’s code for short ribs, slow-cooked for 12 hours at 78°C. While the barbecue ribs themselves are tasty, we’re disappointed by the buckwheat pancakes on which the ribs are perched. They’re measly, bland rounds – certainly not the stars of this small plate. The dish pairs well with Alcoholic’s Breakfast ($108), a vodka-based tipple with a jolt of caffeine. We fare similarly with the other savoury pancakes that we sample, like Pearl ($128) and Chu ($128) – enjoying certain aspects apart from the pancakes themselves. Our final sweet pancake selection – Running Honey ($58) – is the saviour. These golden brown, fluffy hotcakes are a honey-coated delight, from the silky honey butter to the crunchy honeycomb shards. Stack’s pancake-and-cocktail spin is definitely cool, but until the savoury pancakes improve, we’d recommend stopping by post-dinner for a drink and a sweet pancake or two. Stephanie Pliakas Verdict: Pancakes and cocktails for the hipster crowd Stack 1 Third St, Sai Ying Pun, 2549 9787; stackconcepts.com. Dinner for two: $600.

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  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Sheung Wan

Spilling out into the street for a tipple after clocking off for the day is a staple pastime for many a Hongkonger. Every now and then, however, a bar comes along that invites you to step away from the hustle and bustle into a much needed sanctuary. Down a narrow staircase on Bridges Street, Lof 10 Distillery seeks to do just that.  There’s an impressive terrace, but much like its namesake café – Lof 10 on U Lam Terrace – the whisky bar is nestled out of sight. However, while the former is open and welcoming, the Distillery sports a slightly cold, minimalist interior. Nonetheless, it’s muggy and mid-June, so we step inside. Cool interiors and low-lighting make this a comfortable space, albeit disjointed as the main seating area is disconnected from the bar. We order a Woo cocktail ($120) to start the evening – a refreshing drink made with Campari and limoncello, though the addition of lemon rind adds a sharp edge to an already tart drink. While the cocktail menu is impressive, it pales in comparison to the whiskies. Lof 10 Distillery considers itself to have the finest selection in town, and a glance along the wall adorned with bottles shows they’re definite contenders. With an impressive array of Japanese whiskies, on recommendation, we opt for the Iwai wine cask finish ($190). The smooth undertones of this blended whisky are perfectly matched with a subtle, smoky flavour, and it goes down a treat. While best served neat, a glass of ice and water with a pipette are on hand t

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Tsim Sha Tsui

Blinding incidents in Hong Kong bars have probably increased significantly in recent times. Such has been the exponential rise in the popularity of darts. No longer cast to the darkest, dankest corner of a pub to rot away in cobweb-ridden wooden cabinets, darts are now common place in bars across the city. Seizing upon this, the Japanese phenomenon i Darts has added to its hundreds of darts-dedicated bars and expanded beyond its homeland for the first time by opening in Tsim Sha Tsui’s vertical drinking centre, Katherine House. On exiting the elevators, darts bombard you from every direction. To the left of the dim, open space, a massive, illuminated purple, red, and white bulls-eye hangs above the lustrous bar. Directly in front, there’s a cabinet filled with darts memorabilia, and beyond, a series of ten buzzing, chiming, flashing machines called Darts Live 2, the latest Sega-designed, state-of-the-art electronic darts gizmos, stretching across the ebony and charcoal bar. The i-stage, an elevated, spot-lit machine, takes centre stage, with a long couch providing a comfortable stadium-like viewing spot. Lots of darts in a room might sound like a rather timid affair, but i Darts Club is surprisingly lively. The bar has adopted the slogan “Fun and communication”, promoting a friendly atmosphere, best manifested at the regular, raucous darts parties where the R&B, J-Rock, and 15-minute versions of Eye of the Tiger are overshadowed by the deafening collision of inflatable stick

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  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Central

Updated October 15, 2020 There’s a time and place for everything. Sometimes it simply calls to have a decadently fancy night out on the town and Caprice Bar offers a place to do it. Award-winning fine French dining kingpin Caprice, housed in the suave Four Seasons hotel, has transformed the small private waiting area, adjacent to the dining room, into Caprice Bar – a tasteful, intimate and comforting fine wine and cheese room, with Persian and European flair, designed by Spin Design Studio and the Alan Chan Design Company.Bold prints and textiles in deep earthy, purple tones frame a mesmerising lounge-like atmosphere – perfect for winding down after a busy day at the office. Drop by at the bar and be dressed-to-impress as the establishment has a firm dress code. You’re going to want to make an effort anyway, as you’ll most likely be sitting snugly away on the same lush and expansive sofas together with Hong Kong’s elite, who are sure to stop in and lounge around for some demure pre-dinner sips or a sophisticated nightcap. The menu includes an extension of Caprice’s far-ranging wine list, spotlighting an array of unique wines and Champagnes – by the glass or by the bottle – that change regularly. We suggest those who want the ultimate Caprice Bar experience to order the wine and cheese pairings or get A Bit Of Everything sample cheese platter ($450) that includes Caprice's signature aged comté, matured for at least 36 months. For those who aren’t big fans of cheese or wine, Ca

Woobar
  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • West Kowloon

W Hong Kong’s sixth-floor bar is an entertainment destination in its own right. Head here for casual drinks or indulge in an afternoon tea.

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Central

Hong Kong is a city that is never short on places to explore a dram of whisky, but there has never been a bar that solely serves the spirit in its pure form. At House Welley Whisky Bar, there are no bartenders in sight stirring up an Old Fashioned or highballs, only three convivial whisky enthusiasts and a few servers going to and from the shelves serving up drams upon drams of liquid gold.  Created by three whisky enthusiasts Vincent Leung, Eric Ho, Jason Ngai, the trio aims to give whisky the attention it deserves. They have been long time whisky collectors and decided to open a bar to make their whisky hobby sustainable. Since they like to taste, and discover various expressions, and move on to the next bottle, by having a bar, they can buy bottles that they like and share it with the guests.   The place is located on the second floor of the Welley Building, and if you are not 'in the know', it's likely that you will not have even seen the place on your usual bar crawl. Veering away from the typical gentleman's leather den, House Welley Bar exudes a modern vibe that appeals to a young crowd, including both whisky noobs and enthusiasts. The atmosphere is easy going and chilled, with plenty of areas to sit down and relax. Behind the bar is a backdrop of over 200 whiskies served here, divided by style and region offering selections from Islay, Speyside, Japan, America, among others. Expect to find single cask, limited edition, hard to find independent bottlings (IB), and dist

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Cocktail bars
  • Central

What is a bar? The answer seems straightforward – until you experience something that turns all preconceived notions on their proverbial head. Welcome to Hong Kong, J.Boroski. Named after owner Joseph Boroski, this new Central bar is, well, not really a bar. It technically is, of course – inasmuch as drinks are ordered and consumed on-site – but this ‘creative cocktail space’ goes above and beyond what a bar, however superlative, offers. For starters, this invitation-only space has no listed address and also no menu. It’s a formula that’s already seen success at J.Boroski Bangkok, which, upon opening in 2014, quickly became one of the most sought-after seats in town. As with the Thonglor original, the local incarnation has been designed by Boroski’s long-time collaborator Ashley Sutton, of Ophelia fame. Dark, dramatic and spacious, the room’s focal point is the curved ceiling, half of which is tastefully adorned with large rhinoceros beetles forming a mesmerising display over the spotlit bar. Providing a ‘concierge service’ to guests means that drinks are tailored to your tastebuds – to order is to answer a series of questions about your unique preferences. Strong or mild? Sweet or sour? Floral? Herbal? Spicy? Plus, you pay for the liquor and the rest is added for free. A tequila-based tipple ($150) uses clove and leather-imbued Excellia Blanco – we order ours floral and spicy, and get the perfect balance. We then request a herbal, smoky, whisky-based number and find that thi

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  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Cocktail bars
  • Soho

Recently there appeared a curious-looking door on Staunton Street with a small window that betrays only darkness behind it. Put an ear to the door, and nothing can be heard. There’s an innocuous chrome light switch to the right that upon first glance may be taken as a stylised doorbell – flick this and prepare to enter Central’s newest speakeasy. The opening of this place was almost as mysterious as the venue itself, the news spreading predominantly via word of mouth. Despite this, we know that the bar is new and that, for now, making an appointment by phone or the bar’s Facebook page is the only way to enjoy the experience. The interior has the look and feel of a classic cocktail bar with backlit mirrors on cerulean walls, marble tables, gold finishes and cosy corners. A narrow space flanked by seats opens up to the bar counter. Behind the bar stands shelf after shelf packed with various bottles of spirits rising toward the tall ceiling. Old-timey jazz and rock ‘n’ roll numbers play softly in the background, providing an atmosphere conducive to thoughtful conversation. The menu is extensive, with selections of whiskies and gins (averaging around $118 per serving), champagne, red and whites – mostly by the bottle. The cocktail menu is a great introduction to what the bar is all about as it offers classics and house signature classic twists. The It Girl ($128) is a tasty and creative lead-in to the menu. Made with lime infused bourbon, Campari, and rouge vermouth, this Bouleva

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Cocktail bars
  • Central

Updated October 15, 2020 One of the recent additions to Soho's hip and happening high rise, H Code, The Diplomat has since become a watering hole for people hankering for after-work drinks. The bar is the brainchild of award-winning mixologist John Nugent (formerly of Lily & Bloom) who is known for his innovative twists on old classics. True to the nature of a diplomat, you’ll see Nugent being friendly to his customers, helping them decide on orders, and chatting with them at every opportunity.  At first glance, the exterior of the bar looks stiff and corporate; this all changes as you enter the premises and become immersed in the bar’s light and welcoming atmosphere. The interior is replete with leather seats and brass finishings, and while taking these in, it’s easy to miss the intricately detailed ceiling tiles that bear the bar’s logo. Should your inner diplomat have important business to attend to, a lavish hallway with shades of pink and copper will lead you to the posh washroom. Behind the bar hides a secret pink VIP room that you can only enter through a referral from regular patrons.  The bar’s menu is easy to navigate and reasonably priced compared to neighbouring bars. We started with the signature Diplo Daiquiri; house rum blend, pineapple, anise, and salt ($95) followed by Pearl, made with vodka, Campari, French herbs, Mr Black Coffee Amaro, pineapple, and almonds ($95). The two drinks are okay to whet your appetite, made for easy drinking but aren’t standouts. T

Sake Bar Ginn
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Lan Kwai Fong

Fact: sakes are for cool people. Yakuzas drink it, James Bond drinks it, and if you’ve been meaning to get in on this too, then head no further than Sake Bar Ginn – a shiny enclave dedicated to the best nihonshu from Japan. Tucked away in a small commercial building in the middle of LKF, this homey, terraced bar stocks more than 70 bottles, close to 40 of which are available in single-glass tasting pours. Don’t worry if you don’t recognise most of the names listed in the menu – Sake Bar Ginn’s founder Ayuchi Momose (a Sake Service Institute certified sommelier and instructor who also used to work at the famed Sakagura sake bar in New York) has gone to extra lengths to source lesser-known sakes from small, boutique breweries around Japan. It can be a dizzying list for first-timers, which is why the first two pages of the menu are designed like a crash course on sakes, breaking down the difference between the junmai and honjozo families (the former has no added alcohol while the latter does) before going on to categorise them by grade (determined by the percentage of sakamai rice husk that’s polished off before processing) and basic flavour profiles. But the best way to learn is by drinking (of course) and at Ginn, a sake tasting flight is the best place to begin (starts at $500 and up). The staff will happily talk guests through each drink, explaining the back stories (including how one brewery came to be named after otters) and they’ll do the ritualistic steps to help draw ou

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Tsim Sha Tsui

Blinding incidents in Hong Kong bars have probably increased significantly in recent times. Such has been the exponential rise in the popularity of darts. No longer cast to the darkest, dankest corner of a pub to rot away in cobweb-ridden wooden cabinets, darts are now common place in bars across the city. Seizing upon this, the Japanese phenomenon i Darts has added to its hundreds of darts-dedicated bars and expanded beyond its homeland for the first time by opening in Tsim Sha Tsui’s vertical drinking centre, Katherine House. On exiting the elevators, darts bombard you from every direction. To the left of the dim, open space, a massive, illuminated purple, red, and white bulls-eye hangs above the lustrous bar. Directly in front, there’s a cabinet filled with darts memorabilia, and beyond, a series of ten buzzing, chiming, flashing machines called Darts Live 2, the latest Sega-designed, state-of-the-art electronic darts gizmos, stretching across the ebony and charcoal bar. The i-stage, an elevated, spot-lit machine, takes centre stage, with a long couch providing a comfortable stadium-like viewing spot. Lots of darts in a room might sound like a rather timid affair, but i Darts Club is surprisingly lively. The bar has adopted the slogan “Fun and communication”, promoting a friendly atmosphere, best manifested at the regular, raucous darts parties where the R&B, J-Rock, and 15-minute versions of Eye of the Tiger are overshadowed by the deafening collision of inflatable stick

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  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Central

Updated October 15, 2020 There’s a time and place for everything. Sometimes it simply calls to have a decadently fancy night out on the town and Caprice Bar offers a place to do it. Award-winning fine French dining kingpin Caprice, housed in the suave Four Seasons hotel, has transformed the small private waiting area, adjacent to the dining room, into Caprice Bar – a tasteful, intimate and comforting fine wine and cheese room, with Persian and European flair, designed by Spin Design Studio and the Alan Chan Design Company.Bold prints and textiles in deep earthy, purple tones frame a mesmerising lounge-like atmosphere – perfect for winding down after a busy day at the office. Drop by at the bar and be dressed-to-impress as the establishment has a firm dress code. You’re going to want to make an effort anyway, as you’ll most likely be sitting snugly away on the same lush and expansive sofas together with Hong Kong’s elite, who are sure to stop in and lounge around for some demure pre-dinner sips or a sophisticated nightcap. The menu includes an extension of Caprice’s far-ranging wine list, spotlighting an array of unique wines and Champagnes – by the glass or by the bottle – that change regularly. We suggest those who want the ultimate Caprice Bar experience to order the wine and cheese pairings or get A Bit Of Everything sample cheese platter ($450) that includes Caprice's signature aged comté, matured for at least 36 months. For those who aren’t big fans of cheese or wine, Ca

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Central

Hong Kong is a city that is never short on places to explore a dram of whisky, but there has never been a bar that solely serves the spirit in its pure form. At House Welley Whisky Bar, there are no bartenders in sight stirring up an Old Fashioned or highballs, only three convivial whisky enthusiasts and a few servers going to and from the shelves serving up drams upon drams of liquid gold.  Created by three whisky enthusiasts Vincent Leung, Eric Ho, Jason Ngai, the trio aims to give whisky the attention it deserves. They have been long time whisky collectors and decided to open a bar to make their whisky hobby sustainable. Since they like to taste, and discover various expressions, and move on to the next bottle, by having a bar, they can buy bottles that they like and share it with the guests.   The place is located on the second floor of the Welley Building, and if you are not 'in the know', it's likely that you will not have even seen the place on your usual bar crawl. Veering away from the typical gentleman's leather den, House Welley Bar exudes a modern vibe that appeals to a young crowd, including both whisky noobs and enthusiasts. The atmosphere is easy going and chilled, with plenty of areas to sit down and relax. Behind the bar is a backdrop of over 200 whiskies served here, divided by style and region offering selections from Islay, Speyside, Japan, America, among others. Expect to find single cask, limited edition, hard to find independent bottlings (IB), and dist

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Cocktail bars
  • Central

Updated October 15, 2020 One of the recent additions to Soho's hip and happening high rise, H Code, The Diplomat has since become a watering hole for people hankering for after-work drinks. The bar is the brainchild of award-winning mixologist John Nugent (formerly of Lily & Bloom) who is known for his innovative twists on old classics. True to the nature of a diplomat, you’ll see Nugent being friendly to his customers, helping them decide on orders, and chatting with them at every opportunity.  At first glance, the exterior of the bar looks stiff and corporate; this all changes as you enter the premises and become immersed in the bar’s light and welcoming atmosphere. The interior is replete with leather seats and brass finishings, and while taking these in, it’s easy to miss the intricately detailed ceiling tiles that bear the bar’s logo. Should your inner diplomat have important business to attend to, a lavish hallway with shades of pink and copper will lead you to the posh washroom. Behind the bar hides a secret pink VIP room that you can only enter through a referral from regular patrons.  The bar’s menu is easy to navigate and reasonably priced compared to neighbouring bars. We started with the signature Diplo Daiquiri; house rum blend, pineapple, anise, and salt ($95) followed by Pearl, made with vodka, Campari, French herbs, Mr Black Coffee Amaro, pineapple, and almonds ($95). The two drinks are okay to whet your appetite, made for easy drinking but aren’t standouts. T

Trafalgar
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Wan Chai

The past decade has been all about wine, wine, wine. The abolition of taxes last year, as well as the momentum behind wine has seen it creep up on the brown spirits as a leader in our local industry. But while vino has been dominating, beer has been left behind. With the boutique and luxury beer market worldwide burgeoning, Hong Kong has largely been left drinking San Miguel, Heineken, and Carlsberg by the bucket, with the occasional Sol for those feeling exotic. What’s been lacking is a real beer culture and a widely accessible range of decent brews. So, when a new bar like Trafalgar opens with a palpable dedication to the lager, ale and stout cause, it’s a little bit exciting. The guys behind Trafalgar take their beer seriously, demonstrated by the 11 varieties available on tap. Indeed, few – if any – beer dens in Hong Kong can boast a greater selection. The creamy, hoppy Spitfire Smooth is arguably the highlight of the draught beers ($54/pint) – a beer that Trafalgar management claims isn’t available on draft anywhere else in Wan Chai. Of the near 50 beers offered at Trafalgar, the wonderfully dark and potent Thomas Hardy Vintage Ale is one of the standouts, both because of its rareness and its $118 price tag. The Trashy Blond, Punk IPA, and RIP Tide ($50), a trio of beers from Scottish microbrewer Brewdog, are also a welcome surprise, providing a more artisan, boutique twist to the traditional ale-dominated list. Despite its clear enthusiasm for the amber liquid, there’

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TED's Lookout
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Wan Chai

But as a bar that seeks to be a new hotspot catering to those looking for a place to ‘Tai-hang’ after work, our eyes are on the drinks. Zanzo’s selection is fairly extensive and well-priced. There are hard-to-find Japanese beers including bottles of Hitachino Nest Extra High ($70) and Suntory Premium Malts ($70) on the list and bottled wines for those seeking something a little light. For those hoping to knock back a few hard ones, Zanzo’s Japanese whiskies selection includes Nikka Taketsuru Pure Malt ($80) and the superb Yoichi Single Malt ($190) – either should do the trick. For something a little fancier, try the special cocktails. The Yuzu ($75) and the Lemon & Lime Chuhai ($75) are both spritzy rays of sunshine locked in a glass. The citric fruitiness of the drinks are blended well and delightfully refreshing.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Tsim Sha Tsui

Head through the grand double doors, up the elevators and down a dim corridor somewhere within the walls of the newly-opened Rosewood hotel, and you will find an inconspicuous knob. Flip the panel up, enter the password, and with a resounding whoosh, the wall will open inwards, leading you into Hong Kong’s first ladies-only speakeasy – XX. Named after the chromosomal combination only females possess, the sultry cocktail bar is a haven for girls. Sorry, gents, it’s no man’s land from here! Much like the hotel, XX is furnished luxuriously without an ounce of pretentiousness or contrivance. With the birds-and-bees patterned wallpaper, plush, emerald green couches, and sensual lighting from ornate chandeliers, the hidden bar is an ethereal oasis specifically tailored to ladies’ likings. Among their signature cocktails, we were feeling Sexy. A champagne-based cocktail, the Sexy ($160) is an intoxicating concoction of jasmine, bergamot orange, fizz and London No. 3 Gin. Citrusy and sweet and velvety smooth when it hits the tongue, the fruity bergamot proves a perfect foil for the sharpness of the gin and the effervescence of the champagne. Topped off with a dainty jasmine flower in its tall, slender glass, Sexy is the quintessence of femininity. The BFF ($130), in contrast, is a refreshing, light, easy-on-the-throat highball that pairs Fair vodka with cucumber juice, pine needles, and yuzu vinegar. Combined with a decorative, rolled-up slice of cucumber containing pine needles and

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  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Wine bars
  • Soho

Opening its doors this autumn in LL Tower just off Hollywood Road, Think Wine is the labour of love of renowned French sommeliers Romain Loriot and Jean-Benoît ‘JB’ Issele. The two are no strangers to Hong Kong’s food and beverage scene, previously holding head sommelier positions at Le Comptoir (the group behind popular restaurants Ecriture and Bibo) and Michelin-starred Belon, respectively. This new venture sees these two forces of the wine world come together in an intensely personal venture that reflects the pair’s extensive knowledge, impressive attention to detail, and passion for vino. The bar boasts almost 600 wines from across the globe, with particular emphasis – at least 250 varieties – from the Burgundy and Languedoc-Roussilon regions of France. All well and good for the amateur oenologists amongst us, however such a varied menu is potentially grape-ly bewildering for the average customer. To ease the picking process there are friendly and knowledgeable staff on hand to educate in an un-patronising way about the tipples, and guide the appropriate drink to the lips of even the most winey of philistines. In terms of volume, wines are offered here by the bottle and by glass, with prices ranging from as low as $60 per glass to as high as $15,000 per bottle. A good place to begin is at the cheap end of the spectrum, but for those looking to really explore Romain and JB’s collection, a cool glass of the Italian Maso Cantanghel ($120) proves a nice white to start on, wit

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bars and pubs
  • Cocktail bars
  • Central

There’s been a veritable whirlwind of hype in recent months surrounding the new brainchild of accolade-heavy bar team Sandeep Hathiramani and Gagan Gurung. After a litany of unfortunate setbacks delayed the bar’s opening, the swell of anticipant whispers from thirsty patrons has now given way to bums on seats, as Tell Camellia finally opened within Central’s stylish H Code complex in late July.  The mission of the bar is to fuse tea and cocktail culture in a way that challenges all who drink here to abandon preconceived cocktail notions, and to steep themselves in the unknown. Of course, challenging staid notions with something seldom seen (or indeed drank) before is never going to be an easy task, especially considering the perennial popularity in Hong Kong of more traditional cocktail styles. However, true to form, the duo seems to be succeeding in their quest here, purveying a delicious selection of cocktails (or Teatails, if you will) that pair well with the bar’s inviting ambience and very personable customer service. Let’s start with the menu which, much like the bar’s interior, is outwardly simple yet impressively attentive to detail. The lineup is split between signature Teatails, all of which are infused with exotic teas and local spices from particular world regions, and house gins that have been lovingly redistilled with different flavoured, you guessed it, tea. The entire experience here has been designed to be gratifyingly thematic, so expect some extra touches l

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