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Since 2008 Time Out Hong Kong has been inspiring people to discover the best of the world’s greatest city. In spite of the recent challenges Hong Kong has faced, the city remains a place we call home and what makes it home are the restaurants, cafés, bars, traditional shops, boutiques, barbershops, music venues and art galleries. These are the places where we come together to eat, drink, laugh, think and have a good time. Unfortunately, for many of these businesses the last few months have made it hard to survive. If we don’t take action right now, countless venues may close forever. Many places, already struggling to pay their bills, are having to struggle on with greatly reduced incomes whilst they wait for their customers to return.

  • Shopping
Summer has officially arrived and apart from changing up your wardrobe, your skincare routine needs a seasonal change too. But instead of scoping out international brand names and getting distracted by glamorous, glitzy packaging, consider turning to local businesses instead. Here are some of our favs! RECOMMENDED: Head to Hong Kong's best beaches and make a stylish statement with the help of these swimwear shops in town.
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  • Restaurants

The mercury is rising in Hong Kong, and while there's ample reason to get excited about beaches, and new drinks to quench your thirst this summer, there are also a host of exciting new restaurants in our city opening their doors this month. From new pizza joints, to modern Vietnamese food, to French cuisine, a steakhouse, and much more, these are the best new restaurants for you to try this month. RECOMMENDED: If you want the low-down on more recent openings, check out our list of new restaurants for June.

  • Things to do
While many of us enjoy a good strenuous hike, sometimes there's nothing better than enjoying a good trek in nature without the need to exert ourselves to the absolute fullest. Considering that the Hong Kong summer is well and truly upon us, short wanders out in nature – in which sweating is kept to reasonable rather than torrential levels – can prove especially prudent, especially for those who are tired of staying in all day watching Netflix with the AC on full blast. Here are some of the best hikes in Hong Kong that take less than one hour. By Hoi Man YauRECOMMENDED: What better way to avoid the heat than avoiding the sun? Check out the Best Night Hikes in Hong Kong.
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  • Things to do
Directly translated from its Chinese counterpart, ‘Kong girl’ is a local slang often used to describe Hong Kong women who may be demanding, materialistic, slightly narcissistic, and yet somewhat adorable in their own way. As strange as it may sound, there’s no shame in being a Kong girl. In fact, it’s beyond important to embrace these perfectly imperfect individuals that make up our wonderfully diverse city. And frankly speaking, we all have a little Kong girl inside of us (don’t deny it). So, are you qualified to be a true Kong girl? Read on and see how many of these peculiar quirks and habits you can tick off. By Natalie Lam RECOMMENDED: Anyone can call themselves a Hongkonger, but these 11 signs of a real Hongkonger will separate the fakes from the real deal. 
  • Restaurants
Fries usually play second fiddle to the main feature of the meal, whether it be burgers, fried chicken, or steak. However, there are some fries in Hong Kong that transcend their supporting role to become as, if not more, tasty than the food they're meant to complement. We're talking the height of crispy, fried perfection that leaves us foodies always wanting more of these scrumptious snacks. Whether you like yours skinny or chunky, light or fat-fried and decadent, here are some of the very best fries that our city has to offer.  RECOMMENDED: We all love fries, but if you want more food options for the weekend, check out our list of the best pizza restaurants, or even the best omurice in Hong Kong.
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  • Film
The new wave cinema movement emerged around the world from the 50s to the 80s as a rejection of conventional cinematic production techniques and narratives, which many young filmmakers saw as formulaic and played out. New wave films often eschewed conventional narrative patterns in favour of non-linear storytelling focused on feelings rather than a plot, used non-professional actors, and experimented heavily with the way that shots were framed and filmed.  However, Hong Kong's new wave cinema movement was arguably more restrained by financial considerations than its regional contemporaries, as the production of many films were financed primarily by pre-sales. This resulted in several key stylistic differences – a tendency to stay within traditional genres, the casting of celebrity actors, and a lack of the 'stillness' that made other new wave titles from abroad conceptually interesting yet challenging to watch. As such, films from Hong Kong new wave are more down-to-earth and accessible than one might expect; it's more than likely that you've watched many new wave films without even knowing it. But despite restrictions, these directors still produced progressive films that ultimately pushed the envelope for cinema forward. By Ethan Lam RECOMMENDED: If you’re in the mood for – no pun intended – something else to watch, check out our lists of best rom-coms, comedies, horror films, wuxias, and even x-rated flicks. 
  • Sex and dating
FIRST IMPRESSION Tiffany: “Nice person, very polite, and a bit shy.” Ben: “She came off as very mature and professional, the exact opposite of me. This made me a little nervous, but I tried to stay open to the possibilities.” CHEMISTRY Tiffany “We both kept an open attitude to get to know each other. It was overall a good conversation. However, I didn’t feel any romantic chemistry between us.” Ben “I’d say the entire date was a little uncomfortable. We didn’t really have too much in common. I found it difficult to keep the conversation going. AWKWARD MOMENT Tiffany “One or two, which was understandable, considering we both had a long day from work and we had literally zero knowledge of the other person before the date.” Ben “There was a lot of awkward silence. We were asked if we wanted more food, but I got the sense that she really wanted to wrap things up, so we just turned them down.” AFTERWARDS Tiffany “We just politely said goodbye to each other.” Ben “After a little extra small talk with the restaurant owner in the elevator, we just said goodbye to eachother and went home, very alone.” THE VERDICT ♥♥ Tiffany  “He was really nice and friendly, and the restaurant was really nice, but I think we were just too different.” ♥♥ Ben “She seemed like a nice person, but there wasn’t much of a connection. Didn’t think we had a similar sense of humour so it was tough to open up.
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  • Restaurants
Omurice may not be the first thing that comes to mind when one thinks of Japanese cuisine, but this simple delicacy is definitely an egg-cellent dish that’ll satisfy you at any time of the day. Sure, you can cook up some rice, wrap it in an egg omelette and customise your very own omurice at home. But why bother when we’ve already scoped out some of the city’s best omelette rice offerings for you? So, read on, take your pick and get your eggy fix. By Natalie Lam RECOMMENDED: Let’s face it, Hongkongers are suckers for the humble egg – good thing we’ve put together a list of the best egg dishes in town.
  • Music
  • Dance and electronic
Hong Kong’s bright neon lights, endless skyscrapers, and bustling roads have all cemented it as one of the biggest and busiest cities in the world. It’s also this sleepless image that has inspired the electronic, cyberpunk aesthetic adopted by films like Blade Runner and Ghost in the Shell. It should be no surprise then that there’s a strong wave of individuals that are putting headphones on, bringing laptops out, and spinning turntables, all in an effort to nurture and maintain an electronic music scene in Hong Kong.  Hong Kong’s history with electronic music is a deep and complex one. The mid 20th century saw a cultural boom in cities everywhere, and Hong Kong – being the crossroads for East and West – was no different. Everyone remembers the Golden Age of pop culture and Cantopop in the 70s and 80s. Artists like Leslie Cheung, Anita Mui, and Beyond dominated local radio stations, and forged a new identity for Hongkongers from a fusion of international musical influences. Similarly, disco fever in the West had seeped into the bloodstream of energetic, young creatives here in Hong Kong. Venues like Disco Disco and Canton Disco dared to challenge the norm of only posh, swanky hotels such as the Peninsula having electronic parties. These new clubs ushered in a new, carefree attitude where anyone was welcome, and everyone knew how to have a good time. Secret underground raves were also often held on the outlying islands. Sadly for some, as we approached the new millennium, Hong
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