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22 things we're looking forward to in 2022

Time Out New York editors share what's exciting them most about the year to come in NYC

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It's hard to believe we've almost come to the end of yet another year. While that's always a time to look back on the year that's passed—from the best new restaurants of 2021 to the Best of the City—it's also a time to look forward to January in NYC and beyond. Below, Time Out New York editors share the things they're most looking forward to in the year ahead from brand-new openings to returning faves.

Time Out Market New York

Things we're looking forward to in 2022

Can you believe we've gone two years without our beloved Mermaid Parade? Two years without the whimsical undersea floats, the glittery fins and their majesties King Neptune and Queen Mermaid! We have missed the pure fun and joy that comes with dressing up like a fish just for fun and the positivity that surrounds both marchers and those on the sidelines. The date has been set for its return—June 18, 2022—so start planning your look now!—Shaye Weaver

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Midtown West

Break out the trombones! Hugh Jackman returns to Broadway in a revival of Meredith Willson's brassy 1957 musical about a wily con man who stirs up "Trouble" in small-town Iowa but meets his match at the local library. This production gives him the most deluxe berth imaginable; Sutton Foster is his leading lady, and the extremely tony supporting cast includes Tony winners Jayne Houdyshell, Jefferson Mays, Marie Mullen and Shuler Hensley. The production reassembles nearly the entire creative team of the Bette Midler Hello, Dolly!, including director Jerry Zaks, choreographer Warren Carlyle and set and costume designer Santo Loquasto; EGOT winner Jonathan Tunick provides the orchestrations.—Adam Feldman

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New Yorkers have been flocking to Governors Island—a repurposed Army and Coast Guard base—for years to attend events like the Jazz Age Lawn Party, Brooklyn Music Festival and more. But, starting 2022, peace-seekers will likely ride the five-minute ferry to the island from Manhattan to spend the day at the new QC NY spa set to open on site. Originally scheduled to welcome visitors this past September, the spa isn't quite ready yet but should be in the next few months. In addition to the stunning views of lower Manhattan, guests will get to revel in several outdoor infinity pools, steam rooms, saunas, indoor treatments and more. This will be the first QC Terme Spas and Resorts location to open outside of Europe. Clearly, a big deal.—Anna Rahmanan

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  • Theater
  • Theater & Performance

When visitors head to a Broadway show next summer, they may want to consider getting there a few hours early. That way, they’ll be able to spend some time exploring the brand-new Museum of Broadway, the first-ever institution dedicated to the history of the Great White Way, that’s set to open on 45th St. next year. Described as an interactive and immersive experience, it’s certain to be an informative and entertaining peek behind the curtain!—Will Gleason

Two new openings from chef Melissa Rodriguez
Photograph: Courtesy Natalie Black

6. Two new openings from chef Melissa Rodriguez

In February, Melissa Rodriguez, Del Posto’s former executive chef, will open a new, sourdough-focused pizza place in Chelsea called Mel’s. Crown Shy/Saga’s Jeff Katz and James Kent are attached. Later in the year, she’ll return to the sweeping Del Posto space to open a new Italian fine dining restaurant called Al Coro.—AS

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Pantone Color of the Year at ARTECHOUSE
Photograph: Courtesy ARTECHOUSE

7. Pantone Color of the Year at ARTECHOUSE

This year's Pantone Color of the Year is Very Peri, which is blue with red undertones. The soft, almost purple-y color will show up next year across ad campaigns and in fashion, Pantone predicts. In fact, it'll be the subject of a new digital art show at Chelsea's ARTECHOUSE in the new year. The show will evoke the emotion and feel of the color and offer a customized cocktail menu from the gallery's newly opened XR Bar. We're excited to be awash in this calming color and see a new trippy art show to start our 2022 off right.—SW

The one-and-only Elton John embarked on what he announced to be his final tour back in 2018. Consisting of over 300 shows worldwide and scheduled to last three years, the Farewell Yellow Brick Road tour (a nod to his 1973 album Goodbye Yellow Brick Road) came to a halt first given the COVID-19 pandemic and then following a hip injury sustained by the artist. But, as they say, the show must go on. John is scheduled to return to New York in 2022, heading to Madison Square Garden in Manhattan in February and then taking the stage at the Barclays Center in March. It is truly a once-in-a-lifetime experience to see John live, which makes his final shows that much more important to catch.—AR

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One of New York’s biggest art events, the Whitney Biennial, generally takes place every two years but, after being postponed a year due to Covid, the massive cultural festival hasn’t taken place in the city since 2019. Now, America’s premier survey of contemporary art is coming back in a big way and will be held in the city’s Meatpacking District from April to August. The event also marks the 80th edition of the Biennial.—WG

  • Art
  • Art

One of New York City's most iconic artists is getting their own massive exhibit in the spring. "Jean-Michel Basquiat: King Pleasure" will feature 200 never-before-seen and rarely seen works by Basquiat at the Starrett-Lehigh Building in Chelsea. Even cooler, the exhibit is being put together by artist’s sisters Lisane Basquiat and Jeanine Heriveaux, who run his estate, which means we'll get a more intimate look at the artist and his work than ever before!—SW

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Another Restaurant Week
Photograph: Courtesy Michael Tulipan

11. Another Restaurant Week

Last season’s Restaurant Week cast as wide a net as ever, with more than 500 NYC restaurants offering prix-fixe specials across a few new price tiers. It's always a welcome opportunity to revisit restaurants that might seem a little too expensive at other times, or try new-to-you spots with enticing offerings.—AS

Back in 2018, the Italian American Museum in Little Italy shuttered in order to expand and eventually re-open in a facility six times bigger than its original. Although the renovations were scheduled to last two years, the museum is still closed and set to finally re-open in the spring of 2022. Just as in the past, the space will play host to a number of both permanent and temporary exhibitions, plus educational offerings, cultural programmings and more.—AR

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The citywide festival JanArtsNYC, an annual presentation of amazing performances at various NYC venues, is coming back this year in a live format! Throughout the month of January, you’ll be able to catch new works in theater, dance, opera, music and more. Supported by the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, the festival includes PROTOTYPE, which will contain five world premieres, The Public Theater’s beloved Under the Radar Festival and the 18th Annual NYC Winter Jazzfest. Why says January’s a bad time to be in New York?

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  • Art
  • Midtown West

The pandemic made us wait for the first half of the Costume Institute's "In America: A Lexicon of Fashion" exhibit, which delves specifically into American fashion and the "emotional qualities" within it. It's the first time the Costume Institute exhibition is being divided into two separate parts, so we're looking forward to seeing the full picture once "In America: An Anthology of Fashion" opens in May. We're particularly excited to see fashions featured in "vignettes" across The Met's period rooms rather than in a gallery.—SW

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Midtown West

There's been a lot of rain. Isn't it time for a parade? Beanie Feldstein (Lady Bird) headlines the very first Broadway revival of Funny Girl, the musical biography of stage and radio personality Fanny Brice that launched Barbra Streisand to superstardom in 1964. The score, by Jule Styne and Bob Merrill, features the standards "People" and "Don't Rain on My Parade"; Harvey Fierstein is revising Isobel Lennart's original book, and Michael Mayer (Spring Awakening) directs a cast that also includes Ramin Karimloo as Fanny's love interest, the handsome nogoodnik gambler Nick Arnstein.—AF  

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

This new theme park-style ride coming to Times Square should be a perfect new activity for when you have out-of-towners visiting (or it could make for a very memorable date night). The three-part journey will lift you up and give you the illusion that you’re soaring over New York while you’re suspended 30 feet in the air. The brand-new attraction, which starts previews at the end of this month, also contains some other intriguing bits, including a film by award-winning documentary director Ric Burns and museum galleries exploring New York’s pop culture evolution.—WG

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Fans of Lou Reed will be treated to a free exhibit featuring previously unseen and unheard work from Reed’s archive. Opening March 2, "Lou Reed: Caught Between the Twisted Stars" will show off audio and video of performances and interviews, photographers’ original prints and contact sheets, handwritten lyrics, personal correspondence, studio notes, album proofs, press, tour posters and Reed’s personal book and record collections and even a selection of Reed’s guitars and stage equipment. There hasn't been anything like it in NYC before, so it'll be a must-see!—SW

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It is not every day that one of the greatest American soprano voices joins forces with an A-grade Hollywood actress to retell the mythic story of Penelope, the queen of Ithaca in Homer's Odyssey. Renée Fleming will be performing and Uma Thurman will be narrating the work by playwright Tom Stoppard and composer André Previn at the Carnegie Hall premiere of the show on January 23 (which, for now, seems to be the only date available). The stars will be accompanied by the Emerson string Quartet and pianist Simone Dinnerstein.—AR

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