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Photograph: Courtesy Kintaro Lab

Best udon in Hong Kong

Forget ramen, we find the best udon restaurants in the city

Written by
Time Out Hong Kong
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When thinking of Japanese noodles, the first thing that comes to mind for many is ramen, the salty, soupy concoction in a bowl, often adorned with thick slices of pork and an egg for good measure. There is another noodle dish that is equally popular in Japan, but is much less greasy and generally makes for a healthier meal, udon. We feel that this wheat flour noodle, which is usually served in a light broth, deserves more attention. Luckily there are more than a few restaurants around the city that do this easy-on-the-stomach noodle dish very well. Here are some of the best of them. By Hoi Man Yau

RECOMMENDED: Can’t get enough of Japanese food? Check out our list of the best Japanese restaurants in Hong Kong.

Best udon in Hong Kong

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Quarry Bay

Udon noodles themselves are largely flavourless, which is why the broth they come in is vital to the success of the dish. Snapper serves a lusciously sweet sea bream broth, boiled for ten hours before it is brought to the table. It’s so delicious that you might just find yourself downing the bowl of soup even before you finish the noods. Those looking to kick the seafood flavour up a notch should try the boiled king crab with soup udon noodles ($138) – a grand experience with up a whole king crab for your enjoyment drizzling the crab’s sweetness.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Tai Kok Tsui

This udon restaurant is unique in Hong Kong, as it is the only place that serves Himokawa udon, a 10cm-wide specialty noodle – think something akin to a wheaty cloth – traditionally served as a hot dish for winter in the Gunma prefecture of Japan. 

Kintaro prepares their Himokawa à la minute, and patrons can choose from a range of toppings, and serving types. Slurp on the noodles cold or hot with a rich bonito and soy based broth, or curry broth that the noodle absorbs thanks to its unique shape and size. 

The best part of all this is that the udon selection starts at the wallet-friendly price of $58, increasing as you add different toppings. Prepare to stand in line for a while during peak hours though, as this place is popular and small.

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Kwun Tong

This local udon place tucked into a commercial building in Kwun Tong serves Sanuki udon, one of the most iconic types of udon, carrying the former name for Kagawa Prefecture, where it comes from. The noodles here are freshly made by hand every day, and this keeps the noodles springy and a joy to slurp both hot or chilled.

We recommend the salmon roe soy sauce udon ($77) for a refreshing summer treat which is a simple but nevertheless delicious udon, with flavourful salmon roe that pops in your mouth as you slurp away. If the udon itself isn’t quite satiating that Japanese food craving, try the juicy and thin battered shrimp tempura ($51) and the savoury enoki beef roll ($42) as an add-on.

If you enjoyed your meal, Katsuo Udon also sells packaged udon (from $28), which allows you to take the enjoyment of udon back home. For the udon fanatics, Katsuo Udon also offers an udon class ($530) where you can make your very own udon.

  • Restaurants
  • Tsim Sha Tsui

Those who have been to Japan have probably come across Marugame Seimen. The well-known noodle chain is a welcome guest in Hong Kong, because it serves up Sanuki udon and a wide selection of soup bases along with an add-on bar where patrons can freely enjoy a range of tempura at the self service bar. Try the Tomato Beef Udon ($49) for a hearty bowl of udon presented in hot, rich and thick tomato broth which balances the beef’s high fat content.

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  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Quarry Bay

Run by a husband and wife from Kawasaki, Camper’s is a Japanese restaurant which believes in healthy eating, claiming their food has no MSG and food additives, the sauce and dressing are all homemade and natural so you can be sure you’re taking care of your body while eating here.

Tastewise, our favourite is the slow-cooked pork cartilage udon ($69). Stewed for seven hours in a homemade sauce, the pork cartilage is cooked to a tender and soft state that melts in your mouth, releasing the sweetness of the sauce and the heavenly flavour of the pork.

How about other dishes from across Asia?

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