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Mapopo Community Farm
Photograph: Facebook/Mapopo Community Farm

Local farms you can support by buying fresh produce

Go green and help the Hong Kong farming community

Written by
Time Out Hong Kong
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Times are changing. What with the outbreak restricting movement between countries and causing health concerns. Then there’s climate change, making us rethink how we should all be treating our planet. As a result, more Hongkongers have been turning to local farms, not only for fresher produce but also as a way to support local communities while helping the local economy too. So, whether you want to pick up groceries for your next meal, or looking to experience the beauty of rural areas for yourself, here are five local farms to get you going. By Elaine Wong

RECOMMENDED: More of a hiker than a farmer? Here are some of the best hiking trails in Hong Kong to try. For those not looking to go too far, take your pick from the list of city hikes in your area.

Local farms you can support by buying fresh produce

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Mapopo, which stands for ‘the baby of Ma Shi Po Village’ in Chinese, was founded by local villagers in 2010. Passionate about nature conservation, this community farm practices sustainable agriculture and actively hosts markets, guided tours, and workshops to attract urban Hongkongers to their farm. Learn how to DIY compost with your own kitchen waste, or simply enjoy the abundance of freshly harvested veg. To purchase directly from Mapopo Community Farm, pop on over to their Life Market and Farm Market held on most Wednesdays and Sundays. Refer to their official website and Facebook for updates.

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93-year-old Uncle Kun has become the new neighbourhood favourite since his appearance on local television in July, making his fish pond business in Yuen Long’s Tai Sang Wai Village very popular. Not only did his determination as a traditional fish farmer touched the hearts of many, but it is the quality of his freshwater produce that has been bringing customers back, time and time again. Since 1973, Uncle Kun has been providing healthy, steroid-free fish, competing against imports from mainland China and other countries. If you’re a fan of seafood, Uncle Kun has you covered. As a wholesale business, Uncle Kun encourages bulk-buying to reduce excessive labour. Stay tuned to Fairview.com, a small enterprise that sells Uncle Kun’s fish seasonally, or contact district councillor To Ka-lun for more details regarding purchasing, volunteering, or visiting the fish farm.

 

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If you agree that our city is in dire need of more greenery, you’d be pleased to know that rooftop gardens and urban farms, owned by City Farm in Tsuen Wan and Kwun Tong, already exist. To promote a greener lifestyle, City Farm offers organic farming and planting courses for budding green fingers to enjoy an urban agricultural experience that comes with your own little patch of land. They also supply organic soil and fertiliser, as well as professional gardeners on hand to help water and tend to your plants if you need it. City Farm’s products are sold under their brand, Farm Made. Purchase the items online here, or check the farm’s website for more information about courses.

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Established in 2011 in Yuen Long, Fruitful Organic Farm offers fruit-picking activities which are perfect for those looking for family-friendly things to do in the city. If farming is a bit much for your kids, take them out for fruit-picking and collect a colourful variety of fresh fruits and vegetables. This can include strawberries and watermelons, as well as lettuce, tomatoes, and spinach. Alternatively, you can rent a plot of land to grow your own produce, and have the farm deliver their products to your door every Tuesday. Reach out to the farm manager Uncle Paul, or visit their website and Facebook for more details on their services.

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Spanning 200,000sq ft across Kam Tin, AuLaw Organic Commons uses sustainable farming methods to yield fresh melons that are especially sweet, along with beans, and other organic fruits and vegetables. Not only are the crops irrigated with clean water from underground wells, but the varieties are also adjusted seasonally, and the soil is regularly enriched with natural compost. In addition, the farm hosts guided tours every Saturday for visitors to try their hand in farming. Customers can place orders online or through their mobile app. Deliveries are made every day from Monday to Friday.

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