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Great Alpine Road
Photograph: Visit Victoria

The best scenic drives in Victoria

Hit the road and explore some of the most beautiful roads to drive on in Victoria

By Nicola Dowse
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Victoria is home to snowy mountains, centuries-old forests and pristine coastline – all of which are connected by a network of roads and highways just waiting for you to drive. Hey, your rego partly pays for these tarmac trails so you might as well enjoy them. Here’s our top pick of the best scenic drives in Victoria.

Feel like a walk? Check out one of Victoria's best hiking trails. Or stay at home and enjoy a picnic at one of the city's nicest picnic spots.

According to advice from the Department of Health, overnight stays are allowed across regional Victoria, cultural venues are permitted to reopen and restaurants and cafés can offer dine-in service. Some restrictions apply and physical distancing measures remain in place. Check with individual venues for specific opening details.

Victoria's best scenic drives

Road surrounded by trees in Warburton Victoria
Road surrounded by trees in Warburton Victoria
Photograph: Mitch Green

Black Spur Drive

Distance: 56km

Get ready to meet some dinosaurs. Or at least that’s what it feels like what’s about to happen when you drive the Black Spur. As you tootle underneath pole-straight gums and past verdant ferns on a foggy morning (and it does not take much to make it foggy up there), it’s not hard to imagine a velociraptor darting across your path. The road is best started at Lilydale and then followed through to Marysville. Drive carefully and keep an eye out for wildlife, fallen trees and hairpin turns on the way.

The Great Ocean Road
The Great Ocean Road
Photograph: Visit Victoria

Great Ocean Road

Distance: 243km

We cannot stress this enough: it is not called the okay ocean road or the pretty good ocean road. It is called the Great Ocean Road because it is truly great, especially to drive. The winding 243km stretch takes you through fern-laden eucalypt forests and past sheer cliffs that peer out over an endless blue sea. There are plenty of small hamlets to stop in for coffee on the way as well as beaches aplenty. Keep an eye out for wildlife and blind corners.

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Great Alpine Road
Great Alpine Road
Photograph: Visit Victoria

Great Alpine Road

Distance: 303km

You’ve met the Great Ocean Road. Now meet its colder, aloof, but just as magnificent sibling. This road stretches from Wangaratta in the west to Bairnsdale in the east, all the while traversing forested mountains and (in winter) snowy peaks. The B500 takes you through picturesque towns like Bright and Omeo and gives you the chance to meander off and explore regions like Beechworth. During winter, as the name suggests, the Great Alpine Road is also your ticket to ski resorts like Mount Hotham and Falls Creek.

Goorambat Silos painted by Jimmy Dvate
Goorambat Silos painted by Jimmy Dvate
Photograph: Benalla Rural City Council

North East Victoria Silo Art Trail

Distance: 132 km

Driving and art: together at last. The Silo Art Trail features a chain of silos and other large regional buildings that have been upcycled into massive artworks by street artists. The North East trail starts at Benalla (home of the Wall to Wall street art festival) then continues to Goorambat where there is a trio of grain silos featuring works from Jimmy Dvate. The trail then takes you to Devenish, St James, Tungamah and Winton Wetlands, showcasing monolithic street art along the way.

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Half Moon Bay
Half Moon Bay
Photograph: Flickr / Ian Cochrane

Beach Road Melbourne

Distance: 18km

Melbourne might not be known for its beaches in a way that Sydney is, but no one told Beach Road. This suburban roadway between Mordialloc and Brighton is a great option for those wanting a good drive, not a long drive. On the way, you can stop at some of Melbourne’s best beaches if you so desire, as well as rubberneck at the monolithic beachfront homes of the city’s one per cent. 

Grampians
Grampians
Photograph: Visit Victoria

Grampians Road

Distance: 64km

The Grampians is arguably one of Victoria’s best national parks, with dramatic sandstone mountains and views that will make you say, “Kosciusko who?”. If you’d prefer to enjoy the region from the comfort of your car, the Grampians Road drive from Halls Gap to Dunkeld is a wonderful way to do so. On one side you’ll see mountains, on the other, you’ll pass by the beautiful Lake Bellfield and seemingly endless craggy plains. 

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Searoads Ferry
Searoads Ferry
Photograph: Visit Victoria

Port Phillip Bay loop

Distance: Approximately 230km

Thanks to the magic of ferries, you can drive a full loop around Port Phillip Bay. Starting from Melbourne, head west to Geelong and then down to Queenscliff. From there, book you and your vehicle passage on Searoad Ferries to Sorrento where you can follow the Nepean Highway back to Melbourne. You’ll get the best ocean views from Queenscliff onwards, but there’s definitely a certain windswept charm to the scrubby, straw-coloured fields of the Bellarine.

View from Arthurs Seat
View from Arthurs Seat
Photograph: Visit Victoria

Arthurs Seat

Distance: 20km

Arthurs Seat is the highest point on the Mornington Peninsula and unsurprisingly has some pretty neat views of the bay. Heading up the hill makes for a perfect Sunday drive. Be warned though – this is one of the windiest roads in the state with plenty of hairpins. Once you’ve made it up the hill, you can do a loop by travelling on Purves then Main Creek Road, or you can head further north and explore Red Hill (known for its wineries).

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