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Per Se
Photograph: Deborah Jones

The best fine dining restaurants in NYC

Whether for a special occasion or a regular treat-yourself Tuesday, splurge at the best fine dining restaurants in NYC

By Christina Izzo and Jake Cohen
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Many assume that the best fine dining restaurants in New York are of the stuffy French sort—that can’t be further from the truth. There are plenty of Gallic classics, sure, but there are also bright Indian restaurants, cocktail-loving American dining rooms and big-ticket Italian restaurants. Whether you’re looking for some of the best Japanese food in NYC or simply a high-class spot to celebrate a special occasion, the best fine dining restaurants in New York have got you covered.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

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A fine dining spot we love so much that we welcomed them into Time Out Market

Eggplant carpaccio at Nur
Photograph: Cayla Zahoran

Nur

Restaurants Israeli Flatiron

Nur is a leader among New York's best restaurants offering cuisine inspired by Israel and the Levant, so, naturally, we invited it to hold court at Time Out Market New York. 

Best fine dining restaurants in NYC

1
Eleven Madsion Park
Photograph: Noah Fecks + Paul Wagtouicz

Eleven Madison Park

Restaurants American creative Flatiron

Swiss chef Daniel Humm mans the kitchen at this vast Art Deco jewel, which began life as a brasserie before evolving into one of the city’s most rarefied and progressive eateries. The service is famously mannered, and the room among the city’s most grand. But the heady, epic tasting menus are the true heart of Eleven Madison Park, a format that spotlights Humm’s auteur instincts. 

2
Le Bernardin
Photograph: Courtesy Le Bernardin/Daniel Krieger

Le Bernardin

Restaurants French Midtown West

Le Bernardin is the city’s original temple of haute French seafood. Siblings Gilbert and Maguy Le Coze brought their Parisian eatery to Gotham in 1986, and the restaurant has maintained its reputation in the decades since. It is still a formal place, with white tablecloths, decorous service and a jackets-required policy in the main dining room. But a recent overhaul modernized the room with leather banquettes and a 24-foot mural of a tempestuous sea.

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3
Nomad

The NoMad

Restaurants French Flatiron

Five glorious, luxurious rooms. Positively elegant service. Enough foie gras and truffles to make the biggest Francophile blush. A see-and-be-scene crowd. Daniel Humm and William Guidara’s haute-cuisine titan has perfected French-inflected fare. There’s the roasted chicken you’ve read so much about, as well as slow-cooked suckling pig and dry-aged jalapeño-accented duck. The food, like the space, exudes unbuttoned decadence.

4
Atomix
Photograph: Teddy Wolff

Atomix

Restaurants Korean Midtown

In an age when people lose their minds over speakeasies hidden in hot-dog shops and ice cream parlors, Atomix tops them all with the most New York way of hiding a fine-dining Korean restaurant: It’s tucked inside the foyer of a walk-up apartment building on the border of Nomad and Murray Hill. Atomix has no menus; instead, you collect a series of cards throughout the 10-course, $175-per-person tasting menu of modern Korean fare.

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5
Per Se
Roxana Marroquin

Per Se

Restaurants Contemporary American Upper West Side

Expectations are high at Per Se—and that goes both ways. You are expected to come when they’ll have you—you might be put on standby for four nights, only to win a 10pm Tuesday spot. You’re expected to wear the right clothes, pay a non-negotiable service charge and pretend you aren’t eating in a shopping mall. The restaurant, in turn, is expected to deliver one hell of a tasting menu. And it does. 

6
Momofuku Ko
Photograph: Courtesy Momofuku Ko

Momofuku Ko

Restaurants Contemporary American East Village

You’ve got to make it through the reservations ringer to gain access to chef David Chang’s slim tasting menu. The ever-evolving 12 to 15 courses feature dishes like raw fluke in a coating of tangy, mellow buttermilk, poppy seeds and house-made chili sauce or a frozen foie-gras torchon, shaved over lychee puree and pine-nut brittle. It’s all brilliantly executed and further proof that Chang is the kind of pioneer the city needs right now. 

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7
Daniel
Photograph: Roxana Marroquin

Daniel

Restaurants French Lenox Hill

A vibrant redesign by Adam Tihany has brought Daniel Boulud’s classically opulent restaurant into the 21st century. The food is as fresh as the decor, including unusually generous entrees like tender halibut, roasted on a slab of Himalayan sea salt and served with Thai basil, hearts of palm and a mellow yogurt-curry sauce. Sure, Daniel is still a big-ticket commitment, but Boulud and his team make a powerful case for keeping the high-end genre alive.

8
Teddy Wolff
Teddy Wolff

The Grill

Restaurants American Midtown East

Five glorious, luxurious rooms. Positively elegant service. Enough foie gras and truffles to make the biggest Francophile blush. A see-and-be-scene crowd. Daniel Humm and William Guidara’s haute-cuisine titan has perfected French-inflected fare. There’s the roasted chicken you’ve read so much about, as well as slow-cooked suckling pig and dry-aged jalapeño-accented duck. The food, like the space, exudes unbuttoned decadence.

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9
The Modern
Nathan Rawlinson

The Modern

Restaurants Contemporary American Midtown West

Good looks aren’t everything, but they’re serious business here, where tables overlook the MoMA’s sculpture garden and diners carve their meat with Porsche steak knives. The pre-fixe menus are as carefully curated as any museum show, from vibrant opening bites to hearty mains. 

10
Jean Georges
Photograph: Melissa Sinclair

Jean Georges

Restaurants French Upper West Side

Unlike so many of its vaunted peers, Jean Georges has not become a shadow of itself: The top-rated food is still breathtaking. A velvety foie gras terrine with spiced fig jam is coated in a thin brûlée shell; a more ascetic dish of green asparagus with rich morels showcases the vegetables’ essence.

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