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Toronto International Film Festival 2019

Follow this year’s TIFF with exclusive coverage, including reviews, news and more

Jojo Rabbit
Photograph:Kimberly French/Twentieth Century FoxJojo Rabbit

Each September, the Toronto International Film Festival screens more than 300 films from over 60 countries, drawing in an estimated 400,000 attendees. Open to the public, the annual showcase features movies from all genres in cinema, including Hollywood blockbusters, indies, documentaries and foreign films. Considered to be one of the most esteemed film festivals alongside the revered Cannes Film Festival, TIFF is known for its ability to generate Academy Award buzz.

When is the Toronto Film Festival?

The 44th annual TIFF runs September 5–15, 2019.

Where is the Toronto Film Festival?

The festival takes place at various venues in Toronto, Canada.

How do I get tickets?

Buy tickets at the official festival website.

Toronto Film Festival 2019

The Personal History of David Copperfield
Movies

The Personal History of David Copperfield

Charles Dickens comes to life in a vigorous, zany adaptation that feels like a vacation for Veep creator Armando Iannucci

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Waves
Movies

Waves

A golden boy loses his footing—and a younger sister gains hers—in Trey Edward Shults’s radiant family tragedy

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Knives Out
Movies

Knives Out

Murder, skulduggery and an avalanche of plotting makes Rian Johnson's latest a pleasure for those who enjoy being dizzied

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood
Movies

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

Tom Hanks is a beaming, slightly cryptic Fred Rogers in a movie that's more about a journalist in need of a hug

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Jojo Rabbit
Movies

Jojo Rabbit

A Nazi boy befriends a fantasy Führer in Taika Waititi's audacious WWII comedy, charting its way into a tough subject

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Ford v Ferrari
Movies

Ford v Ferrari

Sponsored racecar drivers feel the need for speed in a drama goosed by star power but slackened by corporate intrigue

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
The Goldfinch
Movies

The Goldfinch

Slavishly faithful to the book's subplots but stuck in a two-and-a-half-hour brood, the film version never takes wing

Time Out says
2 out of 5 stars
Uncut Gems
Movies

Uncut Gems

Adam Sandler juggles a gambling addiction, a jewelry shop and a potential windfall in an intense high-stakes triumph

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars

Toronto Film Festival 2018

Can You Ever Forgive Me?
Movies

Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Two struggling souls come together to pull off a hoax on a world that's rejected them, in this powerhouse showcase for Melissa McCarthy and Richard E. Grant.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Widows
Movies

Widows

Oscar-winning director Steve McQueen swerves into the fast lane with an expertly plotted crime movie that’s a showcase for scrappiness.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
First Man
Movies

First Man

La La Land's Damien Chazelle turns the epochal 1969 lunar landing into a piece of breathtaking visual poetry.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Vox Lux
Movies

Vox Lux

The flip side to A Star Is Born, director Brady Corbet’s indie rise of a pop icon—played by a fearless Natalie Portman—is an uneven but fascinating spectacle.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2017

Our 10 favorite films from this year’s Toronto International Film Festival
Movies

Our 10 favorite films from this year’s Toronto International Film Festival

Sparkling indies, future Oscar contenders and midnight fun machines jockeyed for our attention at TIFF

Molly's Game
Movies

Molly's Game

Aaron Sorkin and Jessica Chastain pool their formidable talents to tackle a larger-than-life story that bubbles with smarts.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Lady Bird
Movies

Lady Bird

Saoirse Ronan stars in writer-director Greta Gerwig’s semi-autobiographical drama, a film filled with the wry wisdom of distance.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
The Disaster Artist
Movies

The Disaster Artist

The world's worst film gets an affectionate making-of dramatization that's half as weird as the real thing.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2016

The Girl with All the Gifts
Movies

The Girl with All the Gifts

Easily the best thing to happen to the undead since 28 Days Later, this unusually thoughtful zombie film peps up tired blood with fresh ideas.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Jackie
Movies

Jackie

Commandingly complex, Natalie Portman triumphs in a real-life story pitched an an unthinkable moment of national tragedy.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Denial
Movies

Denial

Playwright David Hare recalls the true tale of David Irving, the Holocaust-denying historian, in a movie that's duller than its subject.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Deepwater Horizon
Movies

Deepwater Horizon

This meat-and-potatoes real-life disaster movie restages the 2010 oil-rig explosion that killed 11 men.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2015

The Lady in the Van
Movies

The Lady in the Van

Imagine Maggie Smith’s cantankerous dowager in Downton Abbey as a bag lady—she's still lording it over everyone, but now she's dressed in a filthy men’s coat from a thrift store, with tape patching up the rips and unsightly brown smears down the back. Meet Miss Shepherd, an elderly homeless woman who lived in a camper van in playwright Alan Bennett’s front garden in London for 15 years. Smith played Miss Shepherd in Bennett’s hit 1989 play and takes on the role again in this hugely entertaining, big-hearted and funny film adaptation directed by his long-standing collaborator Nicholas Hytner (The History Boys). The film was shot in the actual house on the street where the real events took place. Alex Jennings plays Bennett, who buys his house in the late 1960s. His neighbors are writers and intellectuals—guilty liberals who put up with Miss Shepherd’s van parked outside their book-lined homes to prove how tolerant they are. When the local authorities threaten to shoo her, Bennett offers Miss S. the use of his front garden for a couple of weeks. She never leaves. His mother, visiting from Yorkshire, wonders what she does for a toilet. The film offers glimpses of Bennett’s private life, like his crush on a cocky young actor starring in one of his plays. But the focus is on the gloriously rude Miss Shepherd. Any whiff of charity ruffles her ego, so when a neighbor knocks on her window with a creme brulee, she accepts it with haughty contempt. Her delusions of grandeur are hila

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
The Martian and four more knockouts from the Toronto International Film Festival
News

The Martian and four more knockouts from the Toronto International Film Festival

At the midpoint, here are the 5 films that have made us sit up and take notice

Eye in the Sky
Movies

Eye in the Sky

This drone drama arrives so steeped in the clichés of the Hollywood terror-plot actioner—barking generals, truckloads of jihadis, a faintly exotic soundtrack—that it initially almost feels comical. Writer Guy Hibbert and director Gavin Hood then spend the next 102 minutes conscientiously subverting those overused tropes, with varying degrees of success.Helen Mirren is all business and shoulder pads as General Katherine Powell, a British officer overseeing antiterror operations in Kenya. When two of her most wanted targets appear at a safe house in Nairobi, she lobbies for an immediate American drone strike. But operating pilot Steve Watts (Aaron Paul) isn’t so sure—especially when he realizes that the shack next door is home to a little girl so adorable she may as well have the words "innocent victim" tattoed on her forehead. The stage is set for a battle of wills and shifting legalities, as Powell’s higher-ups all attempt to hand off the hot potato, refusing responsibility either for the child’s life or for the many others at risk if the terrorists are allowed to escape.The strongest element here is a rich seam of murky Dr Strangelove humor—the buck-passing antics of cunning army liaison Alan Rickman and his cronies are theatrically hilarious. There are moments of well-judged tension, too, particularly after we meet a Kenyan operative on the ground: As he proved in Captain Philips, Barkhad Abdi is a master of out-of-his-depth-but-holding-it-together bluster.But when it targe

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Cemetery of Splendor
Movies

Cemetery of Splendor

Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s latest film may not resound with the same cosmic heft of his mythical love story Tropical Malady (2004) or his Cannes-winning Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall his Past Lives (2010), but this profoundly quiet sigh of regret is nevertheless the work of a master artist who’s become fluent with his muse. Shot in the months before Thailand’s most recent military coup and set in a remote clinic that was supposedly built atop a burial ground for the country’s ancient kings, Cemetery of Splendor occupies the sad limbo between imminent strife and past trauma.The story, such as it is, concerns a group of soldiers who’ve been felled by a strange outbreak of sleeping sickness, and the mystic bond that forms between an openhearted volunteer nurse named Jenjira (Weerasethakul veteran Jenjira Pongpas Widner) and Itt (Banlop Lomnoi), the patient who’s roused into the waking world by her tender care. Their relationship is strictly platonic—Weerasethakul’s films are less interested in romance than spiritual communion—but it opens the door for both of them to connect with the ghosts that so gently leave their fingerprints on the present.Viewers expecting the mythical pleasures of Weerasethakul’s previous work might be disappointed (there are no red-eyed jungle monsters, nor men turning into tigers), but that just makes the film’s detours into the surreal all the more organic and delightful. This is a movie in which the phantoms of history have been unloosed into the air

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2014

The Judge
Movies

The Judge

Robert Downey Jr. stars in the sort of legal drama that shouts where it could whisper and stomps where it could tiptoe—not always disagreeably

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
The Drop
Movies

The Drop

European actors (including future Mad Max Tom Hardy) do an uneven job bringing a "hey-yous-guys" Brooklyn crime drama to life.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Nightcrawler
Movies

Nightcrawler

Viciously funny, it twins the frenetic hunt for shocking footage with the career ambitions of a closet psycho, played by Jake Gyllenhaal.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Tusk
Movies

Tusk

One imagines the scariest thing to Kevin Smith would be the inability to speak—and that's exactly what he explores in this captivatingly weird horror-comedy.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2013

Don Jon, Blue Is the Warmest Color, Jarmusch and sex
Movies

Don Jon, Blue Is the Warmest Color, Jarmusch and sex

Our first day at the fest has sex on the brain, generously onscreen, and long after the love is gone.

12 Years a Slave
Movies

12 Years a Slave

We review the festival's first sensation, a triumph from director Steve McQueen.

Q&A: Enough Said's Julia-Louis Dreyfus
Movies

Q&A: Enough Said's Julia-Louis Dreyfus

The Seinfeld star talks about comic humiliation and working with James Gandolfini.

Dallas Buyers Club, Supermensch, Prisoners
Movies

Dallas Buyers Club, Supermensch, Prisoners

Hustlers play the odds in three studies of brinkmanship.

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Toronto Film Festival 2012

Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master
Movies

Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master

Read our first impressions after the official North American premiere.

Stories We Tell, Anna Karenina, Silver Linings Playbook
Movies

Stories We Tell, Anna Karenina, Silver Linings Playbook

David O. Russell and Sarah Polley connect as the fest heats up.

Cloud Atlas, Passion, Spring Breakers
Movies

Cloud Atlas, Passion, Spring Breakers

The fest yields a cornucopia of crazy from the Wachowskis and Brian De Palma.

Toronto International Film Festival halftime report
Movies

Toronto International Film Festival halftime report

Ambition and go-for-broke nuttiness mark the 2012 edition.

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Toronto Film Festival 2011

A preamble: the eight films we're most excited about

A preamble: the eight films we're most excited about

From a schedule aching with choices, here's what's unmissable.

Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg and heaviness

Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg and heaviness

Yes, we're chastising a therapy movie for being too talky.

Take This Waltz, Damsels in Distress and more

Take This Waltz, Damsels in Distress and more

Director Sarah Polley is still a shaper of fine performances.

Steve McQueen's Shame, a new NYC classic

Steve McQueen's Shame, a new NYC classic

And then, like that, Toronto offers up a title that makes attendance so rewarding.

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Toronto Film Festival 2010

What we're excited about

What we're excited about

Toronto halftime report

Toronto halftime report

Taking a twirl with Black Swan

Taking a twirl with Black Swan

Let's give a hand to James Franco

Let's give a hand to James Franco

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Toronto Film Festival 2009

The Toronto International Film Festival: A prelude

The Toronto International Film Festival: A prelude

Megan Fox shows off Body

Megan Fox shows off Body

Jason Reitman, stepping Up

Jason Reitman, stepping Up

Kvelling over the Coen brothers

Kvelling over the Coen brothers

Show more