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Toronto Film Festival 2016

Follow this year’s Toronto Film Festival with exclusive coverage, including reviews, ticket info and more

Moonlight

Each September, the Toronto International Film Festival screens more than 300 films from over 60 countries, drawing in an estimated 400,000 attendees. The public film festival features movies from all genres in cinema, including Hollywood blockbusters, homegrown comedies, indie movies and foreign films. Considered to be one of the most esteemed film festivals alongside the revered Cannes Film Festival, TIFF is known for its ability to generate Academy Award buzz.

When is the Toronto Film Festival?

The 41st annual TIFF runs Thursday, September 8, 2016 to Sunday, September 18, 2016.

Where is the Toronto Film Festival?

The festival takes place at various venues in Toronto, Canada.

How do I get tickets?

Buy tickets at the official festival website.

Toronto Film Festival 2016

The Girl with All the Gifts
Movies

The Girl with All the Gifts

Easily the best thing to happen to the undead since 28 Days Later, this unusually thoughtful zombie film peps up tired blood with fresh ideas.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Jackie
Movies

Jackie

Commandingly complex, Natalie Portman triumphs in a real-life story pitched an an unthinkable moment of national tragedy.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Denial
Movies

Denial

Playwright David Hare recalls the true tale of David Irving, the Holocaust-denying historian, in a movie that's duller than its subject.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Deepwater Horizon
Movies

Deepwater Horizon

This meat-and-potatoes real-life disaster movie restages the 2010 oil-rig explosion that killed 11 men.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Blair Witch
Movies

Blair Witch

We're back in those creepy Maryland woods for a poundingly effective update of a horror classic.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Certain Women
Movies

Certain Women

Director Kelly Reichardt brings her delicate touch to a trio of Rocky Mountain stories dominated by complex female characters.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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American Pastoral
Movies

American Pastoral

Actor Ewan McGregor aims high with his directorial debut, taking on a Philip Roth masterwork but only getting so deep.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Moonlight
Movies

Moonlight

The tricky coming of age of a poor Miami kid is the subject of Barry Jenkins finely etched indie portrait of African-American life.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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A Monster Calls
Movies

A Monster Calls

Young actor Lewis MacDougall impresses in this imaginative but overly sentimental fantasy about a child dealing with the horrors of real life.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Queen of Katwe
Movies

Queen of Katwe

The young cast members light up Mira Nair's uplifting, sympathetic story of a Ugandan chess champion.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2015

Evolution
Movies

Evolution

Lucile Hadzihalilovic’s unforgettably unsettling Evolution is set on a rustic island somewhere off the coast of France, perhaps in the stretch of azure sea between the YA dystopia of The Giver and the chilly urban streets of Under the Skin. It's a place where single women with white brows and black pupils raise a generation of young boys without fathers (nowhere to be seen). During the days, the youths go swimming amongst the coral. At night, their mothers feed their kids a mush of curdled squid ink and inject their skinny arms with a vile sleep-inducing goop they refer to as “medicine.” One evening, a curious little boy named Nicolas (Max Brebant) manages to resist his dose, slipping out of the spartan house he shares with his mom (Julie-Marie Parmentier). He follows her to the shore, and that’s when things start to get weird. It’s been a decade since Hadzihalilovic’s only other feature, 2005’s Innocence, and it seems as though the writer-director has been hoarding her nightmares ever since. Tense with terror and told with abstractly beautiful imagery across long stretches of wordless quiet, Evolution watches its dark and mysterious world with the same curiosity that keeps Nicolas awake at night, his primal fears taking root in our own. The movie flirts with the outline of a coherent plot, but the answers to its dramatic questions have all sunk to the ocean floor in a plume of beatific marine footage and Cronenbergian body horror. (Especially when Nicolas is confined to a d

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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10 things we learned at the Toronto International Film Festival
Blog

10 things we learned at the Toronto International Film Festival

Our cinema picture for the coming months is a lot clearer. Here are 10 takeaways we've gleaned from #TIFF15

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The Meddler
Movies

The Meddler

Imagine if Clueless had starred a 68-year-old Susan Sarandon as an overbearing mother and you’ll have the right idea about Lorene Scafaria’s The Meddler, a sweet and sneakily effective portrait of a woman learning how to re-engage with the world after the greatest loss of her life. Sarandon plays Marnie, a recent widow who’s been bequeathed more money than she can spend and more love than she can share. The only way she can cope with no longer being a wife is by doubling down on her activities as a parent, and so the film begins with the thickly accented New Jersey native uprooting herself from the East Coast and moving to downtown Los Angeles in order to be close to her daughter, Lori (the great Rose Byrne). Lori, alas, is too much of a raw nerve for her mom’s smothering displays of affection, so Marnie has no choice but to mother somebody else. Or, in her case, everybody else, beginning with one of the genius-bar technicians at her local Apple Store (Jarod Carmichael), whom she befriends and starts driving to night school. Elsewhere, Marnie tries to chip away at her fortune of guilt by sponsoring a wedding ceremony for one of Lori’s friends (Cecily Strong). The pathos behind these indiscriminate acts of generosity are transparent from the start (making the scenes in which Marnie visits a shrink a bit redundant), but Sarandon’s exuberant performance is delivered with care and conviction. Crucially, it feels like Marnie is beginning to understand herself. Writer-director Scaf

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Hardcore
Movies

Hardcore

A revolution in action cinema that works despite its utter silliness (or because of it), Russia-born filmmaker Ilya Naishuller’s supercharged, wholly first-person coup achieves a near-experimental bliss—you won’t know how it was executed, nor will you care. The idea comes from video games and, before them, horror’s occasional camera-eye sequence, famously extended by Brian de Palma in movies like Blow Out. Hardcore turns this gimmick into a feature-length concept, not without precedent. Yet because it’s a gory nonstop fight movie (unlike, say, 1947’s first-person detective noir Lady in the Lake) the cameraman has to be as agile and fearless as a stuntperson, flinging himself into hand-to-hand combat, out the doors of exploding vehicles, over fences, down stairwells and onto the edge of a dorky dance number.The plot fits on a postage stamp: You're Henry, a mute cyborg suffering from a complete memory wipe. Nursing you back to health is the scientist girlfriend you can’t remember (Haley Bennett). As you make your brutal way through dozens—hundreds?—of unlucky henchmen toward an evil boss (Kozlovsky), you encounter Jimmy (District 9's Sharlto Copley, the movie’s default star), a chatty shape-shifter and helpful presence who sometimes appears as a British gangster, an exuberant brothel regular or a pot-smoking hippie.Hardcore isn't deep. It's not about complex ideas; it's not going to win any awards for female characters; even the CGI effects that supplant its euphoric takedowns

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
Users say
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2014

The Judge
Movies

The Judge

Robert Downey Jr. stars in the sort of legal drama that shouts where it could whisper and stomps where it could tiptoe—not always disagreeably

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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The Drop
Movies

The Drop

European actors (including future Mad Max Tom Hardy) do an uneven job bringing a "hey-yous-guys" Brooklyn crime drama to life.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Nightcrawler
Movies

Nightcrawler

Viciously funny, it twins the frenetic hunt for shocking footage with the career ambitions of a closet psycho, played by Jake Gyllenhaal.

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Tusk
Movies

Tusk

One imagines the scariest thing to Kevin Smith would be the inability to speak—and that's exactly what he explores in this captivatingly weird horror-comedy.

Time Out says
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2013

Don Jon, Blue Is the Warmest Color, Jarmusch and sex
Movies

Don Jon, Blue Is the Warmest Color, Jarmusch and sex

Our first day at the fest has sex on the brain, generously onscreen, and long after the love is gone.

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12 Years a Slave
Movies

12 Years a Slave

We review the festival's first sensation, a triumph from director Steve McQueen.

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Q&A: Enough Said's Julia-Louis Dreyfus
Movies

Q&A: Enough Said's Julia-Louis Dreyfus

The Seinfeld star talks about comic humiliation and working with James Gandolfini.

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Dallas Buyers Club, Supermensch, Prisoners
Movies

Dallas Buyers Club, Supermensch, Prisoners

Hustlers play the odds in three studies of brinkmanship.

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Toronto Film Festival 2012

Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master
Movies

Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master

Read our first impressions after the official North American premiere.

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Stories We Tell, Anna Karenina, Silver Linings Playbook
Movies

Stories We Tell, Anna Karenina, Silver Linings Playbook

David O. Russell and Sarah Polley connect as the fest heats up.

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Cloud Atlas, Passion, Spring Breakers
Movies

Cloud Atlas, Passion, Spring Breakers

The fest yields a cornucopia of crazy from the Wachowskis and Brian De Palma.

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Toronto International Film Festival halftime report
Movies

Toronto International Film Festival halftime report

Ambition and go-for-broke nuttiness mark the 2012 edition.

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Toronto Film Festival 2011

A preamble: the eight films we're most excited about

A preamble: the eight films we're most excited about

From a schedule aching with choices, here's what's unmissable.

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Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg and heaviness

Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg and heaviness

Yes, we're chastising a therapy movie for being too talky.

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Take This Waltz, Damsels in Distress and more

Take This Waltz, Damsels in Distress and more

Director Sarah Polley is still a shaper of fine performances.

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Steve McQueen's Shame, a new NYC classic

Steve McQueen's Shame, a new NYC classic

And then, like that, Toronto offers up a title that makes attendance so rewarding.

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Toronto Film Festival 2010

What we're excited about

What we're excited about

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Toronto halftime report

Toronto halftime report

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Taking a twirl with Black Swan

Taking a twirl with Black Swan

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Let's give a hand to James Franco

Let's give a hand to James Franco

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Toronto Film Festival 2009

The Toronto International Film Festival: A prelude

The Toronto International Film Festival: A prelude

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Megan Fox shows off Body

Megan Fox shows off Body

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Jason Reitman, stepping Up

Jason Reitman, stepping Up

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Kvelling over the Coen brothers

Kvelling over the Coen brothers

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