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Things to do in Melbourne this week

The week's best events in one place – it's your social emergency saviour for fun things to do in Melbourne this week

Whisky Wine and Fire event
Photograph: Supplied
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Wondering what to do in Melbourne this week? We can help. Check out our curated guide to all the fun things to do in Melbourneincluding free attractionsart exhibitionstheatre showsactivities for kids and so much more. 

Things to do in Melbourne this week

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Whisky, Wine and Fire event
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do, Fairs and festivals

Whisky, Wine and Fire

icon-location-pin Caulfield Racecourse, Caulfield East
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The name says it all, really. Whisky. Wine. Fire. There can be no better way to stay warm and celebrate winter.  Whisky, Wine and Fire takes over Caufield Racecourse for the second year running, this time on the weekend of July 18-21. Over the four nights, guests will be able to imbibe in whisky from a bunch of local and international distillers and wine from both boutique and popular wine growers from Victoria and South Australia.  Lucky for you, your $16.50 ticket gets you entry, a souvenir glass to take home and a wine tasting. You can buy additional tastings and full glasses, and boy, you'll want to, with whisky from the likes of Timboon Distillery, Starward, Chief's Son, Maker's Mark and Woodford Reserve, and wine from Innocent Bystander, Barossa Valley Estate and Tahbilk.  And don't forget the food – you'll want to match that wine and whisky with saucy, barbecue and smoky delights from Pastuso's Alejandro Saravia, Milk the Cow, Tokyo Tina and Charlie Carrington from Atlas Dining.  There will be heaps of awe-inspiring fire displays in the fire garden, masterclasses and live music throughout the night. 

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Woman pouring tea to another woman
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do, Fairs and festivals

Melbourne Tea Festival

icon-location-pin Meat Market, North Melbourne
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Pinky ready? The Melbourne Tea Festival is back for another round. On Sunday, July 21 this enormous tea party will feature tea purveyors from Melbourne and beyond, showcasing new blends, rare teas, brewing equipment and techniques. Now, about those specialist teas: this year you can get your mitts on anything from locally made loose-leaf blends to chai concentrate and cold brew tea. Four Pillars will be providing tea-inspired cocktails, while a series of ticketed workshops will teach you how to blend your own tea and the basics of baking with matcha. Festival-goers can also browse and shop ceramics and tea-wares if you're in the market for a new tea set. If you’re after something a little bite to go with your cuppa, there will also be a range of food stalls offering treats both savoury and sweet. LuxBite will even be baking a custom menu of tea-infused macarons, croissants and cakes. Attendees will receive a signature porcelain cup (valued at $5) with your entry ticket so you can taste your way through blends throughout the day. Keep in mind that you have to choose between a morning and afternoon festival session when buying tickets. If there was ever a day to fight for your right to pour-tea, this would be it.

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Photo: Francois Duhamel
Film, Comedy

Booksmart

The story follows Dever and Feldstein's characters, two academic superstars and best friends who, on the eve of their high school graduation, suddenly realize that they should have worked less and played more. Determined never to fall short of their peers, the girls set out on a mission to cram four years of fun into one night.

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Things to do, Markets

Madame Brussels Lane European Night Market

icon-location-pin Madame Brussels Lane, Melbourne
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Rug up and head to the Madame Brussels Lane European Night Market this winter, where food stalls, lots of mulled wine and entertainment are warming up your night. Every Friday in July, Madame Brussels Lane, located just off Lonsdale Street, transforms into a European winter hotspot.  Drawing inspiration from Christmas markets in countries like Switzerland and Germany as well as European discos, the European Night Market includes food and drink stalls to bring on the good times for the after-work crowds. Expect delicious food like Turkish gozleme from Göz City, piping hot mugs of spiced rum, German sausages from Bavarian Bangers and sticky, candied nuts from Chooh La La. Need more drool-worthy reasons to visit? Think Nutella-stuffed doughnuts from Café Babbo, pastries from Eat Cannoli, panzerotti (savoury pastry) from Il Panzerotto and treats from Pop Up Crepe, the Brulee Cart and Degani. You want to know about the gooey, oozy cheese, right? Well, Frencheese will be on hand to serve you melted raclette, perfect for cold winter nights. If you underestimated the wind chill you'll also be able to pick up scarves, beanies and gloves from Spoilt, as well as update your 'do with a discounted cut at Men's Barber Shop.  Feeling thirsty? Little Lon Distilling Co, which occupies the CBD's only single-story house, has created a bespoke cocktail for the occasion, called A Lon Winter's Night. It's the distillery's own Ginger Mick Gin, Le Birlou apple and chestnut liqueur, lemon, cloudy

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Dingo encounters
Photograph: Cass Knowlton
Things to do

Dingo Puppy Encounters

icon-location-pin Dingo Discovery Sanctuary, Research and Education Centre, Melbourne
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Every weekend until September 22, the Dingo Discovery Sanctuary and Research Centre is offering visitors the chance to cuddle, pat, feed, play and take photos with their adorable dingo cubs and friendly dingo adults. Every Saturday and Sunday at 11am and 2pm, guests will have the chance to spend some quality time with these little fuzz-balls, and also learn about what makes the dingos so special from the sanctuary’s team of keepers. Tickets are $49 for adults and $35 for children. Children must be seven or older, and seven to 12-year-olds must be accompanied by a paying adult.

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Cinema in the Cellar
Photograph: Supplied
Film, Special screenings

Cinema in the Cellar

icon-location-pin Rob Dolan Wines, Warrandyte South
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Rob Dolan Wines is teaming up with the crew at the Farm Yarra Valley for a film screening with a twist – you can now see a film inside a working wine cellar. On Friday, July 19, you’ll be able to see Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper in A Star is Born in the cosy barrel room of Rob Dolan Wines. This Yarra Valley winery will be offering meals from the Farm Yarra Valley, wine, beer, and cheese from local Yarra Valley producers. Doors open at 5.30pm with the screening starting at 7.30pm. Bookings are essential, and tickets are $35.

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Come from Away 2018 Broadway cast photo credit: Matthew Murphy
Photograph: Matthew Murphy
Theatre, Musicals

Come from Away

icon-location-pin The Comedy Theatre, Melbourne
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Melbourne's theatre scene might look to be totally dominated by a certain boy wizard in 2019, but there's another big show headed our way from Broadway.  Come from Away is set to open at the Comedy Theatre in July. The historic theatre will get major refurbishment and new seats (anybody's who's sat through long show at the theatre knows the seating is a necessity) in time for Come From Away's Australian opening. The musical has been a bit of an unexpected hit in North America, set in a small Canadian town in the days following the September 11 attacks. Written by Canadians Irene Sankoff and David Hein, it tells the true story of Gander, where 38 international flights carrying 7,000 passengers were forced to land, effectively doubling the population of the town with stranded passengers for several days. The vibrant score has Celtic flavours, and the show's cast recording was nominated for a Grammy Award. The musical started out with a 2013 Ontario production, and then went on to tour the US before landing on Broadway in early 2017. It was nominated for seven Tony Awards last year and picked up the award for Best Direction of a Musical for Broadway veteran Christopher Ashley, who'll be overseeing the local production. Read Time Out New York's four-star review here.

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Cakes at Sweet Set High Tea
Restaurants, Patisseries

Sweet Set

icon-location-pin Grub, Fitzroy
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This is one for the sweet tooths out there. Fitzroy café Grub is back with Sweet Set for 2019, a series of Sunday afternoon tea sessions from July 14. Melbourne's best makers of sweet things will take turns in the kitchen to come up with delicious treats at this weekly event. First up will be a quartet of sweets connoisseurs including Bethany Claire Cakes, Candied Bakery, Cherry Cakes and Miss Ladybird Cakes (Sun Jul 14). The following sessions will be headed up by Don't Lose Your Temper and Tivoli Road (Sun Jul 21), LuxBite and Penny for Pound (Sun Jul 28), Bibelot and Emelia Jackson (Sun Aug 4), Geoffrey Michaels and Cobb Lane (Sun Aug 11), Fig & Salt and Alice Wright (Sun Aug 18), All Are Welcome and Lisa Van Zanten (Sun Aug 25) as well as the chocolate champs from North Melbourne's Mörk who will present the final Sweet Set on Sunday September 1.  Sessions are ticketed with seating times at 11am, 2pm and 4.15pm. Pre-bookings are essential (click the buy ticket button above) and tickets include eight (eight!) courses of sweet and savoury treats, a Prosecco spritz and tea or coffee for $69 per person.

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Photo: Martin Valentin Menke
Film, Sci-Fi

High Life

Monte (Robert Pattinson) and his baby daughter are the last survivors of a damned and dangerous mission to the outer reaches of the solar system.The crew death-row inmates led by a doctor (Juliette Binoche) with sinister motives has vanished. As the mystery of what happened onboard the ship is unraveled, father and daughter must rely on each other to survive as they hurtle toward the oblivion of a black hole. A staggering and primal film about love and intimacy, suffused with anguished memories of a lost Earth, High Life is a haunting, thrilling achievement from visionary director Claire Denis

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actors on stage in production of Solaris
Theatre, Drama

Solaris

icon-location-pin Malthouse Theatre, Southbank
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“Man does not create gods, in spite of appearances. The times, the age, impose them on him”. It’s a gendered response to the overwhelming subservience of belief and the dumb power of the zeitgeist, but it isn’t less true for that. And it’s a direct quote from Stanisław Lem’s extraordinary cult 1961 science fiction novel, Solaris. A work that has had three film adaptations – a rarely seen 1968 Soviet TV play, the seminal 1972 Tarkovsky masterpiece, and Soderbergh’s noble 2002 version with George Clooney – it now comes to us as a stage adaptation for Malthouse Theatre, by Scottish writer David Greig. Every adaptation of this work makes major alterations to the story, which of course are a legitimate response to the times, the age in which they are produced. But not a single one has captured Lem’s intellectual daring, his scholarly penetration into the means and morality of exploration. His imagination is closer to writers like Italo Calvino and Jorge Luis Borges than science fiction greats Asimov or Clarke – his expansiveness is meticulous and his questions unanswerable. Whatever you think of the various adaptations, Solaris the novel is a flat-out masterpiece. Kris Kelvin (Leeanna Walsman) arrives at the substation hovering just above the surface of Solaris, the planet covered entirely in ocean that orbits around twin suns, a red and a blue one. The astronauts living on the substation are Dr Snow (Fode Simbo) and Dr Sartorius (Jade Ogugua); the only personal connection Kelvi

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Hanoi Hannah
Things to do

Good Morning Vietnam

icon-location-pin Hanoi Hannah New Quarter, Richmond

Hanoi Hannah is holding its annual Good Morning Vietnam brunch again, this time, in partnership with STREAT, a charity battling against youth homelessness. Executive chef of Hanoi Hannah, Anthony Choi, will be teaming up with STREAT's head baker, Didiet Radityawan, to create a modern Vietnamese brunch. For $55 you get two courses, coffee and a whole lot of good karma. There will be dishes like a lobster and garlic butter banh mi, mushroom and truffle banh xeo, pastries and Vietnamese-style coffee to choose from. As with any respectable brunch, Bloody Marys, mimosas and punch bowls will be available on the day at an additional cost. All staff working on the day will be volunteering their time, with all proceeds on the day going towards STREAT, so drink up.  Please note that bookings are essential. 

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Photo: Courtesy of Pixar
Film, Animation

Toy Story 4

Turns out, Pixar’s sentient toys can still make us cry. Nearly 25 years after their debut, the sweetly selfless plastic pals return in a fourth Toy Story, one charged by the animated series’ thematic essence of finding purpose in being useful to others. It’s a hopeful, immensely human chapter that echoes the franchise’s complex notions of loyalty, displacement and self-worth, doing so with humour and warmth. Working from a script by Andrew Stanton and Stephany Folsom (as well as six other story contributors, including ousted ex-Pixar chief John Lasseter), director Josh Cooley successfully balances all of these elements – a noteworthy achievement considering the large cowboy boots he had to fill after the epic yet nuanced Toy Story 3, one of Pixar’s perfect achievements. The reliable company of old friends certainly helps: now happily living with a new kid, Bonnie (voiced by Madeleine McGraw), Tom Hanks’s pull-string pardner Woody, Tim Allen’s devoted Buzz Lightyear, Joan Cusack’s feisty Jessie and the rest of the gang are back. New to the clan is Forky (Veep’s Tony Hale, adding nervy personality and genuine weirdness), an existentially confused spork with low self-esteem that the ever-imaginative Bonnie creates as a kindergarten craft project. Convinced of his status as trash (an unusually raw class dilemma for a Pixar movie), Forky get a crash course on his toyness from Woody, himself thrown by a life crisis resembling that of a retiree. Bonnie has moved on to other favori

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Marvel: Journey of Heroes
Image: Supplied
Things to do, Exhibitions

Marvel: Journey of Heroes

icon-location-pin Melbourne Central, Melbourne
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Long before Robert Downey Jr donned the Iron Man suit, Marvel Comics was delighting readers with the derring-do of Iron Man, Spider-Man, the Avengers, the X-Men and all their superhero pals and nemeses.  In fact, Marvel Comics has been around for 80 years, and in celebration, the company is bringing a free exhibition of Marvel art to Melbourne. The exhibition includes work from every decade of the company, from its start as Timely Comics in 1939 to the buff superheroes we love from modern movies.  You can find the exhibition next to the Shot Tower, and entry is free. It includes art from Australian artists including Patrick Brown, Jon Sommariva, David Yardin, BenTemplesmith and Wayne Nichols.

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Sound of music
Photograph: Twentieth Century-Fox
Things to do

Sing-A-Long-A Sound of Music

icon-location-pin Hamer Hall, Southbank
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This winter Hamer Hall will be alive with the sound of music. Sing-A-long-a will be presenting the classic 1960s Julie Andrews film The Sound of Music in sing-a-long mode this July. If singing along with Fräulein Maria, the Captain and all seven von Trapp children is one of your favourite things then this is your chance to do it in style. The Sing-A-Long-A events encourage guests to come in costume for the film screening. Don’t be afraid to pull down your curtains to make your outfit because there will be a competition. Sing-A-Long-A will be hosting two sing-a-long screenings of The Sound of Music, with a matinee and evening show available on Sunday, July 21. Both screenings include a vocal warm-up and subtitles for all the songs (just in case – gasp – you’re a little dusty). Tickets are on sale now.

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Disney
Film, Animation

The Lion King

From Disney Live Action, director Jon Favreau's all-new -The Lion King- journeys to the African savanna where a future king is born. Simba idolizes his father, King Mufasa, and takes to heart his own royal destiny. But not everyone in the kingdom celebrates the new cub's arrival. Scar, Mufasa's brother -and former heir to the throne- has plans of his own. The battle for Pride Rock is ravaged with betrayal, tragedy and drama, ultimately resulting in Simba's exile. With help from a curious pair of newfound friends, Simba will have to figure out how to grow up and take back what is rightfully his.

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People on the rooftop having lunch at Provincial Winter rooftop
Things to do, Food and drink

The Provincial Hotel Winter Rooftop

icon-location-pin The Provincial, Fitzroy
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For a city with such temperamental weather, we sure do have a lot of rooftop bars. The reason? Because we know what to do with then when the weather heads south. Case in point: Fitzroy’s Provincial Hotel is back with another ripper winter rooftop session. This year, the Provincial has swapped crepes for bottomless waffles after teaming up with Wild Turkey American Honey. This breakfast feast will feature a mix of savoury and sweet waffles served with toppings like Tasmanian smoked salmon, various cheeses, curried eggs, pan-fried chorizo, charcuterie, fresh fruits and Melbourne-made honey. GF friends fear not – the waffles can easily be swapped out for gluten-free pikelets. You’ll also get bottomless drinks like wine, beer and sparkling for a two-hour period. Or if you’re feeling extra fancy, you can try one of the Provincial’s American Honey cocktails including a Bacon & Honey Old Fashioned, a Sweet and Sour Iced Tea, and an American Honey John Collins. The Provincial Winter Rooftop is running every Saturday and Sunday, from 11am until 1pm, until August 31. The brunch package is $60 per person for bottomless drinks and waffles with DIY toppings. And don’t worry about the wind chill factor. The Provincial has put up a huge rooftop marquee with plenty of heaters to keep you toasty on those cooler winter days.

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Houses with projected images on them
Photograph: Teagan Glenane
Things to do, Fairs and festivals

Winter Wonderlights

icon-location-pin Sovereign Hill, Ballarat
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Celebrating Christmas in the southern hemisphere is more about sunburns than snow. Yet antipodeans are still sold the story that Christmas is a time to enjoy hearty winter treats, frosty windows and garlands of twinkling fairy lights. If you’ve a hankering to experience a wintry Christmas for real then we suggest heading to Sovereign Hill. Throughout winter Sovereign Hill is hosting Winter Wonderlights – a Christmas-in-July festival where punters can taste limited edition treats, frolic in faux snow showers and gaze starry-eyed at the more than 15 kilometres of fairy light displays. The dark midwinter nights at Sovereign Hill will also be lit up by large-scale light projections that will be shown on 25 different buildings. There will even be a new “light tunnel” that will undoubtedly attract the Instagram crowd. All Melbourne school kids know the value of Sovereign Hill’s boiled lollies, and during Winter Wonderlights you’ll even be able to purchase limited-edition lemon meringue drops. Kids will get up to all sorts of mischief with Sir Ginger the giant gingerbread man, while adults can peruse the European-style street market. Can’t make it at night? Winter Wonderlights is also hosting Christmas pantos and performances during the day. Hey, it might not be Christmas for real but the Sovereign Hill team still take a fair crack at making it feel like it is.

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The Girl who Played with Fire
Photograph: Supplied
Film, Film festivals

Scandinavian Film Festival

icon-location-pin Around Melbourne, Melbourne
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From Noma to IKEA to the principles of hygge, the influence of Scandinavian culture continues to grow. So too the Scandinavian Film Festival, which returns this July for the sixth year, bringing the best of northern European cinema to audiences around Australia. Fans of Nordic noir will have plenty to celebrate this year. The fourth and final instalment of the Department Q series, The Purity of Vengeance, will screen, reuniting actors Nikolaj Lie Kaas and Fares Fares. The previous three gripping instalments will get an encore screening too: The Keeper of Lost Causes (2013), The Absent One (2014) and Conspiracy of Faith (2016). The late Steig Larson did much to bring the pleasures of Scando-crime into popular consciousness with his Millennium novels. A new documentary, Stieg Larsson: The Man Who Played with Fire, offers an insight into the author’s archives, to reveal his crusading work as a journalist investigating extreme right-wing groups in Sweden. You'll also get a chance to see the Swedish Millennium trilogy: The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2009), The Girl Who Played with Fire (2009) and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest (2010). Opening night film is the Danish comedy Happy Ending, in which Helle (Birthe Neumann) looks forward to her husband’s retirement only for him to tell her he’s starting a new career that will see him commuting to France. From Iceland comes A White, White Day, about an off-duty police chief who begins to suspect a local man of having had an

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Woman stretching with a baby goat on her stomach
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do, Classes and workshops

Breathe in & bleat out

icon-location-pin Mission to Seafarers, Docklands
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If the daily grind is making you feel baaad, we've got the perfect event that will really perk ewe up. Breathe in and bleat out is a meditation session where you’re joined by a flock of baby goats and sheep. No, we’re not kidding. The session is hosted by yoga and meditation outfit Karmably, and instructors will walk visitors through some light stretching and sound meditation as the cutest cohort of kids and lambs frolic freely between people. If it sounds distracting, well, you’re right. But having the baby animals roaming about actually serves as a metaphor for newbie meditators and allows you to embrace the chaotic situation and let go of control. You can expect to be cuddled, nuzzled and maybe even nibbled by the wee baby ungulates and be aware that (like all tots) they may lose control of their bladders if excited. There’s a clean-up team on standby at every session, but maybe wear your daggy gym wear just to be safe. Tickets sell out quickly to Karmably's sessions so don't leave it until the last moment if you want to stretch out with goats. Yoga mats, cushions and hand towels are provided, but you’ll need to bring your own eye masks, blankets and yoga props should you require them.

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Bring it On the Musical
Photograph: Nico Photography
Theatre, Musicals

Bring It On: The Musical

icon-location-pin Athenaeum Theatre, Melbourne
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Bring It On: The Musical is returning to the Athenaeum Theatre in 2019 with a new, yet-to-be-announced cast. Read our review of the 2018 Melbourne season below. Did we need a musical based on Bring It On, the popular 2000 cheerleading movie that had so much to say it needed five sequels? It’s not the worst idea, but we did not need this iteration of Bring It On, which suffers from turgid dialogue, forgettable songs, a predictable and overdone plot, and at least in this production, a significant lack of pep. That Bring It On is not better is a mystery, since it was written by an A-Team of contemporary musicals, with a book by Tony Award-winner Jeff Whitty (Avenue Q) and a score by Hamilton genius Lin-Manuel Miranda, Tom Kitt (another Tony Award-winner for Next to Normal) and Tony nominee Amanda Green (Hands on a Hardbody). But while there are flashes of Miranda’s exquisite harmonies and clever wordplay (particularly in ‘Move’, the big number that opens the second act, and in some of the raps), the music is mostly underwhelming. Ballads build but then fade away, and none of the melodies grab a hold of you. In this high-stakes world of competitive cheerleading, the music should rev up an audience, but it’s not distinctive enough to have much impact. The mixing does not help, either; the music overpowers the voices in parts, with critical lyrics difficult to hear. The musical is not a retread of the movie; rather, it features new characters but a plot very similar to the sec

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Queer Deluxe at Bimbo
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do

Queer Deluxe

icon-location-pin Bimbo, Fitzroy
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Melbourne institution Bimbo (universally called Bimbo's) is celebrating LGBTQI pride each and every Sunday from 3pm.  Queer Deluxe is an all-inclusive day to relax, eat, drink, boogie and celebrate queer culture. There are performers, drag queens, DJs and drink specials, including $20 Bloody Mary, Spritz and Margarita cocktail jugs. Bimbo reopened after a devastating fire in May 2019 and has re-cemented its place in Melbourne's north for good times and great eats. And yes, of course, the pizza is still just $4.

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Photo: JoJo Whilden
Film

Spider-Man: Far from Home

Review by Joshua Rothkopf “I didn’t think I would have to save the world this summer,” says a near-terrified Peter Parker (Tom Holland, still charmingly dorky in an Anton Yelchin vein) near the front end of Spider-Man: Far from Home. Many viewers will feel heard: little more than two months have passed since Avengers: Endgame crushed it with three hours of intergalactic pain, not to mention last December’s superb animated Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. Can’t Marvel give it a rest for a season? Well, no. Almost aware of how thirsty it is, the new movie – meta, irreverent and nowhere near a bad time – works best when it plays like a vacation from MCU seriousness. An unexpected blast of Whitney Houston’s 'I Will Always Love You' and a cheesy montage of fallen superheroes (it turns out to be a high-school AV club’s video tribute) brings us up to speed in a new post–Tony Stark world of people reckoning with the “Blip,” when half the world’s population disappeared and suddenly came back. Peter, meanwhile, a self-described “16-year-old kid from Queens,” hopes to reveal his true feelings to MJ (Zendaya, feisty while being quietly vulnerable, showing off big range between this and HBO’s Euphoria) while on a class trip in Europe. As Far from Home leans into this travelogue section, much of it shot on location (the exquisite gondolas and cozy back alleys of Venice require no CGI to be superheroic), you wish the film would remain a breezy teen comedy, one with a panicky best frien

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At Footscary Finds Melbourne
Things to do, Markets

Footscray Finds

icon-location-pin The Line, Footscray
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If you love Camberwell Market's flea market every Sunday, you'll love Footscray Finds. This monthly market (located at the schmick, lo-fi events venue the Line) is set up similarly to Camberwell Market, with a combination of stalls on offer. Stalls are different each month, but you can expect everything vintage clothing, locally designed and made goods and homewares, vinyl records, and even locally grown fresh produce. The market will also feature live music from local musicians and food trucks for when hunger strikes. Keep your eyes out for food and drink from Biggie Smalls, Cobb Lane, Brew Sisters, Oscar's Vintage Coffee Van, Boho Blends and the Copper Pot. The market is free to enter and runs from 9am-2pm on the second Sunday of every month.

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Photo: Jonathan Prime/Universal
Film, Comedy

Yesterday

There’s a lot that’s mind-bendingly corny about director Danny Boyle and writer Richard Curtis’s Yesterday, a peppy ‘what-if?’ musical comedy that imagines a world in which the Beatles never existed. Your ability to spend time in its big-hearted, dad-joke world might lie with your tolerance for Ed Sheeran making fun of himself: if you can cope with those sort of inventions along with the film’s hit-and-miss gag rate and its happy-clappy view of modern Britain, then its endless sugar rush of Beatles covers and endearing performances from the likes of Lily James and newcomer Himesh Patel make it hard not to like. It also has a strange cameo, bold and not what you expect, and maybe the best screen jokes so far about Google searches. (Type ‘John Paul George Ringo’ in a Beatles-less universe and what do you get? ‘Pope John Paul II’ of course.) It all spins on a goofy high concept that blossoms in an average corner of coastal Suffolk. Jack (Himesh Patel, a real discovery) is a struggling 27-year-old singer-songwriter sick of playing to thin crowds. But his bright-eyed old friend and manager Ellie (James) is supportive – and clearly in love with him. The years of musical irrelevance end when there’s an electricity blackout across the globe, a jolt from the storytelling gods so absurd that you go with it. Jack is knocked off his bicycle and wakes in hospital to the gradual realisation that not a single other soul in the world knows who the Beatles are. The most powerful moment in t

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ACCA On Vulnerability and Doubt 2019 supplied
Courtesy the artist
Art

On Vulnerability and Doubt

icon-location-pin Australian Centre for Contemporary Art - ACCA, Southbank
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Putting yourself out there – whether in love, work or friendship – is one of most terrifying things a person can do, so it’s the perfect inspiration for the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art’s winter exhibition. Bringing together local and international artists to engage with questions of intimacy, awkwardness, modesty, fear and desire, highlights of the exhibition include German artist Andrea Büttner’s moving collection of woodcut portraits; the irreverent paintings and animations of Iranian artist Tala Madani; and Sydney photographer and lecturer Cherine Fayd’s depictions of personal fears in public spaces.

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Cai Guo-Qiang: The Transient Landscape NGV 2019 supplied photo
Photograph: Jason Edwards
Art

Cai Guo-Qiang: The Transient Landscape

icon-location-pin NGV International, Southbank
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Cai Guo-Qiang is best known for unique, large-scale artworks that draw on his cultural heritage. In this exhibition, part of the National Gallery of Victoria's prestigious Winter Masterpieces series, he's presenting all new works, ranging from a monumental installation that will see 10,000 porcelain birds suspended over visitors heads to a 31-metre artwork created using silk and gunpowder.  This exhibition is being presented with Terracotta Warriors: Guardians of Immortality, which features eight of the world famous terracotta warriors and other archaeological and historical objects from China. A ticket grants entry to both exhibitions, which stand side by side.

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Parasite 2019
Film, Drama

Parasite

It’s rare for a movie to combine cinematic fireworks and social commentary in quite the thrilling and mischievous way that Korean director Bong Joon-ho manages with Parasite, a slick home-invasion drama that mirrors the masks worn by its characters: polite until they drop the pretence. The director of The Host and Snowpiercer is no stranger to genre gymnastics, and here he tells the story of a poor Seoul family infiltrating the lives of a super-rich household through suspense, drama, laughs and farce, allowing moments of pure terror, quiet observation and baroque noise to sit happily alongside each other. It never jars as it glides from one state of being to the next. The appeal of Parasite is simple and age-old: inequality, class, manners and how we behave to protect what’s ours – or to gain that which we believe should be ours. We meet a hard-up family living in a ‘semi-basement’ with a view of an alleyway where folk like to come and take a piss. The husband Ki-taek (Song Kang-ho), wife Chung-sook (Chang Hyae-jin) and their twentysomething kids, son Ki-woo (Choi Woo-sik) and daughter (Ki-jung) are all scraping together a living doing odd jobs like constructing pizza boxes. The film’s touchpaper is lit when Ki-woo fakes his CV and starts tutoring the daughter of a handsome rich young businessman Mr Park (Lee Sun-kyun) and his equally alluring and polished wife Yeon-kyo (Cho Yeo-jeong). One by one, the rest of the family play the same game and infiltrate the Park household –

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Harry Potter still life painting
Image: Supplied
Things to do, Classes and workshops

Tipples and Tints

icon-location-pin StoryVille, Melbourne
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If you are someone whose creative juices are stimulated by beverages stronger than, well, actual juice, this could be the perfect event for you.  Fairytale-themed bar StoryVille is hosting twice-weekly art classes – with cocktails. Artist Liam Waldie teaches participants how to recreate a painting based on pop culture themes like Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, Dr Seuss and Alice in Wonderland. Entry is $63 and includes a cocktail – plus, more cocktails and jaffles are available for purchase at the bar.  Waldie has been teaching art for 12 years, and his work has been used in posters, T-shirts, wrapping paper and children's books. He guides participants through the painting process step by step, so depending on how many cocktails you've had, you should be able to create your own masterpiece to take home. Each class takes two hours. The classes are on offer every Wednesday at 7pm and every Sunday at 4pm.

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29
The Moon Geelong Gallery 2019
Image courtesy Australian Centre for the Moving Image
Art

The Moon

icon-location-pin Geelong Gallery, Geelong
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July marks the 50th anniversary of the moon landings, so what better way to commemorate the occasion than by examining the ways the moon has inspired art over the centuries? Geelong Gallery’s exhibition features historical works alongside those created during the 1960s space race, contemporary reactions to space exploration and links to literature, film, music, science and popular culture. Among some of the earliest pieces are a 16th century woodcut by Albrecht Dürer, prints by acclaimed Japanese ukiyo-e artist Hiroshige and a rare copy of George Méliès’ 1902 silent film A Trip to the Moon, together with works by contemporary artists William Kentridge, Sidney Nolan and Michael Light.

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Terracotta Warriors NGV 2019
Photograph: Courtesy NGV
Art

Terracotta Warriors: Guardians of Immortality

icon-location-pin NGV International, Southbank
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The National Gallery of Victoria's latest winter blockbuster was a look back at the last 130 years of modern art, but their major 2019 winter exhibitions are looking a fair bit further back. All the way to the third century BCE. For more than 2,000 years an army of 8,000 life-sized terracotta warriors have stood guard at the tomb of Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of China, in the Shaanxi province. The army was entirely unknown until it was discovered by farmers digging a well in 1974. It's not every day you stumble across one of the wonders of the world. In winter a delegation of eight warriors will visit Melbourne as part of an exhibition at the NGV called Terracotta Warriors: Guardians of Immortality. True, eight warriors out of 8,000 feels a little bit measly, but they'll be presented alongside more than 150 treasures from ancient China. But the NGV is a gallery that always has one eye on the present and the future, which is why it's presenting another exhibition from China this winter: all new works from contemporary artist Cai Guo-Qiang, inspired by his home country. At the centre of his exhibition is an installation of 10,000 suspended porcelain birds flying high above visitors' heads. 

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31
Camera
Film, Horror

Crawl

When a massive hurricane hits her Florida hometown, Haley (Kaya Scodelario) ignores evacuation orders to search for her missing father (Barry Pepper). Finding him gravely injured in the crawl space of their family home, the two become trapped by quickly encroaching floodwaters. As time runs out to escape the strengthening storm, Haley and her father discover that the rising water level is the least of their fears.

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A Room of One's Own
Photograph: Tommy Holt
Theatre, Drama

A Room of One's Own

icon-location-pin fortyfivedownstairs, Melbourne
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In 1929, as part of her seminal work A Room of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf famously declared that “a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction”. The essay, a call to arms for women to have literal and figurative spaces of their own if they are to participate in the male-dominated world of literature, almost instantly became a classic and is now considered one of the most influential feminist works of the 20th century. Back for a return season after a sold-out premiere production in 2016, Peta Hanrahan’s stage adaption promises to maintain the gentle wit and language of Woolf’s original essay, while drawing parallels to new feminist battlegrounds such as #MeToo and the fight for gender wage parity. It stars Anthea Davis, Marissa O’Reilly, Anna Kennedy and Jackson Trickett.

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33
Brickman Cities Sydney Harbour Bridge
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do, Exhibitions

Brickman Cities

icon-location-pin Scienceworks, Spotswood
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There is something fascinating about seeing a world-famous skyline recreated in tiny Lego bricks. Ryan 'the Brickman' McNaught and his team have built some of the greatest cities in the world out of bespoke Lego for a new exhibition at Scienceworks.  The cities are New York, Dubai, Tokyo, Sydney and London, and the exhibition showcases their histories for almost a thousand years, from castles and forts to skyscrapers and instantly recognisable landscapes.   The centrepiece of the exhibition is a 3m by 4m to-scale model of lower Manhattan, built out of white Lego. Stories of New York are 3D projected onto the buildings for extra insight into the city's history.  Lego fans can also have a go of building their own cities of the future in an interactive section of the exhibition.   It took more than 1,900 hours and 1 million individual Lego bricks to build the exhibition. Catch it at Scienceworks until August 4. 

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Altitude
Film, Documentary

Armstrong

ARMSTRONG is a dramatic and emotional documentary that features never-before-seen family home-movie footage, along with still and moving images that chronicle Neil Armstrong's incredible life. With the support of the Armstrong family, including his two sons Rick and Mark, the film details his near-death experiences as a fighter pilot in Korea, his test pilot days, the drama and excitement of the Gemini 8 and Apollo 11 missions, and the challenges that followed his extraordinary fame. The film will launch into theaters and on demand July 12th to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the first moon landings.

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35
Escape the Gaol
Photograph: Supplied
Kids, Active events

Escape the Gaol

icon-location-pin Old Melbourne Gaol, Melbourne
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Entertain the little ones these school holidays at the Old Melbourne Gaol, where they'll be opening their creaking gates to both kids and parents (or should we say inmates and their jailers?) for the Escape the Gaol experience. The plan is simple: escape to freedom without being caught by the guards who patrol the prison. Each young criminal is given a book of riddles. As they solve them they’ll discover directions to hidden clues. Put enough clues together and they can formulate an escape plan. Aimed at ages six and older, this interactive and educational event gives the opportunity to learn about Melbourne’s rich crime history, beyond just Ned Kelly and his gang, as well as the opportunity to experience one of Melbourne’s most famous historical landmarks first hand.

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A bowl of smoked brisket ramen
Photograph: Supplied
Restaurants, Barbecue

Texakaya Burn City Pop-Up

icon-location-pin Collins Kitchen, Melbourne
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Now that the weather has well and truly turned on us, our winter white knight for the days when the wind-chill factor makes it feel Arctic, not Australian, is Burn City Smokers. The low'n'slow barbecue maestros have revived their inner city pop-up at Collins Kitchen. But this year they're doing things differently. They've brought their custom-built smoker to town, but what they're serving is a fun mash-up of Japanese and Southern barbecue – they're calling it Texakaya.  Most importantly, there's a ramen on the menu that features 14-hour Texas-style wagyu brisket in place of the typical char siu pork. They're also ladling big bowls of Carolina-style tonkotsu made with a 12-hour smoked pork broth and crunchy smoked pork belly pieces. If you prefer plants, there's a mushroom ramen starring smoked king brown and shiitake mushrooms in a ginger and porcini mushroom broth. And you can bulk it out with a whole head of cauliflower, seasoned in miso and smoked for three hours to give it some earthy grunt.Stepping away from the smoker, there are tasty bites on sticks in the classic yakitori tradition; a chicken schnitzel sandwich that's channelling some katsu vibes with Kewpie mayo; and smoked ribs. It's also worth giving time and stomach space to the dessert menu, which features taiyaki, soft serve, mochi of the day, cheesecake, pecan pie and a red velvet cake with buttermilk ice cream.   They pop-up runs throughout winter, but will shut up shop promptly at the end of August, so to

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37
Keeper of Lost Causes
Film, Drama

The Keeper of Lost Causes

Based on the international bestseller, the riveting first film in the Department Q series introduces maverick detective Carl Mørck who, after majorly botching an assignment, is relegated to reviewing cold cases. With his new partner , the moody Mørck begins digging into the unsolved disappearance of a high-ranking female politician who supposedly committed suicide but whose body was never recovered-a mystery that plunges the investigators into a dark and disturbing conspiracy. A nonstop series of ingenious twists and shocking surprises keep the suspense simmering in this stylish thriller.

38
 X-Men: Dark Phoenix
Film

Dark Phoenix

First, the good news: Dark Phoenix is a fairly watchable addition to a franchise that has felt stretched to breaking point. It boasts visual sass, the set-pieces are mostly fun and the acting stands up as well as you’d expect with a charismatic cast well-grooved in the X-universe. In Sophie Turner’s Jean Grey and Jennifer Lawrence’s Raven, it has two nuanced female characters front and centre – three, if you count Jessica Chastain’s ethereal alien-type creature – something that still can’t be said for too many superhero movies. It’s not nearly as good as Logan or X2, but it’s a whole lot better than the eyeball-poking affliction that was X-Men: Apocalypse. On the flipside, it still feels like a fairly pointless retread of Chris Claremont and John Byrne’s The Dark Phoenix Saga, which we’ve already seen (and hated) in Brett Ratner’s 2006 disaster X-Men: The Last Stand. It bolts on a pallid alien invasion storyline that’s more X-Files than X-Men and is laden with lumpen dialogue about destiny and "controlling your inner power" that could have been lifted wholesale from a tai chi manual. Throw in a long delay in the release date and there’s the inescapable feeling of a franchise half-heartedly winding down before the inevitable reboot kicks in, with Disney (and the might of Marvel Studios) replacing 20th Century Fox at the wheel and meshing the mutants into its superhero pantheon. Dark Phoenix introduces the serving X-Men as a kind of global 000 service, leaping into the X-Jet

Time Out says
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39
High Cheese The Westin Melbourne
Things to do, Food and drink

High Cheese

icon-location-pin The Westin Melbourne, Melbourne
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What’s better than gorging yourself on scones, finger sandwiches and Champagne at a regular high tea? Gorging yourself on piles and piles of cheese at the Westin’s un-brie-lievable High Cheese event. Yes, the insanely successful, sold-out event is back for 2019. The idea for High Cheese began when Westin executive chef Michael Greenlaw teamed up with Anthony Demia from Maker and Monger to bring a series of cheeses together in both sweet and savoury dishes. Running until August 31, High Cheese brings some favourites from last year's menu plus a few new additions to the table. Traditional scones and cream are swapped out for L'amuse Signature Gouda scones served with whipped spiced butter. There's also black truffle, porcini and walnut layered Brie Fermier la Tremblaye; Swiss Gruyere Vieux Gougères with burnt green leek; and Marcel Petite Comté Réservation custard tarts for the savoury section.  For the sweeter side, there's poached French pear with stracciatella, fresh honeycomb and smoked roasted macadamia crumble; ruby chocolate parfait with Brillat Savarin Frais and raspberry jam; caramelised salted white chocolate tiramisu; plus ricotta cassata cannoli.  The coup de gras (pun intended) is the whole baked Normandy camembert served with lavosh that you can dip right into the cheese, like your very own cheese fondue. Holy cheesus. The Westin's High Cheese is priced at $70 per person and is available every day from 5pm. Guests can also add on a wine pairing which starts

40
at Queen Victoria Night Markets
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do

The Queen Victoria Night Market

icon-location-pin Queen Victoria Market, Melbourne
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Spend your Wednesday nights surrounded by food at the Queen Victoria Market's legendary Winter Night Market. Rows and rows of street food stalls, festival bars, as well as more than 50 art, fashion, homewares and general knick-knack merchandise traders will feature alongside a rotating line-up of musicians and entertainment.  Food stalls will be cooking up delicious snacks all night long. This season you can get amongst market favourites Burn City Smokers who are serving some smoky American-style barbecue; Churro Kitchen with their sugar and cinnamon dusted churro bowls; and ReWine who have your weekly fix of hot, spiced mulled wine sorted.  New traders for winter 2019 include Mörk Chocolate with their ethically-sourced hot chocolate (FYI it's our favourite hot choc in the city); Melted Cheese Bar who are serving melted cheese baguettes and toasties; Ciao Chips with their take on Belgian frites; Pierogi Pierogi with pierogi, naturally; Melbourne Cocoa with some artisan chocolate; plus Turkish at QVM who are serving pideli kofte (a meatball-style kebab) with red sauce and yogurt. You're going to want to come hungry. Right in the heart of the city, the markets make a great dinner stop for anyone coming from work, or tourists looking to experience the famous markets after dark. The markets have a reputation for multiculturalism so no matter what cuisine you fancy, you're likely to find something that sets your mouth watering.  Love Christmas? The market is transforming into

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41
Film, Drama

Rocketman

Taking the old-fashioned highs of an MGM musical and pairing them with the deep lows of an addiction drama, Rocketman is a turbo-charged rock fantasia that pushes hard against the boundaries of the medium as it zips through the first four decades of Elton John’s life. The songs explode from the screen, time jumps catapult the story forward with exhilarating élan and even the emotional stuff lands, for the most part. Sure, Elton John purists will be here until Christmas pointing out the flaws in the chronology and the liberties taken with real-life events, but they’ll be doing it dancing in the aisles. It’s a credit to director Dexter Fletcher, who really comes of age as a filmmaker here, that any thoughts of Bohemian Rhapsody fade away in the first few minutes. Fletcher was parachuted in to help finish that Queen biopic, but while there are some superficial parallels, he’s saved all his good stuff for Rocketman. From an opening blast of 'The Bitch Is Back' which thrusts a young Reggie Dwight (Matthew Illesley) into a glorious, sepia-tinged dance routine outside his northwest London home, the movie is filled with vividly choreographed, imaginatively staged, wow-isn’t-cinema-great? moments. One standout sequence finds a drunk and overdosing Elton plunging suicidally into his Los Angeles pool, before segueing from ambulance to hospital to concert stage, via a boyhood version of himself playing the title track on a tiny piano — underwater. It must have looked nuts on the script

Time Out says
42
Tiered plates of food at High Coffee
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do, Food and drink

High Coffee

icon-location-pin Sheraton Melbourne Hotel, Melbourne
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Sorry, tea – you’ve had plenty of time to be paired with finger sandwiches, scones and macarons. Now it’s time for High Coffee, Sheraton Hotel’s new twist on a classic high tea.  High Coffee features coffee (duh) but also coffee-infused food and Espresso Martinis. Think cappuccino macarons, chocolate hazelnut tarts with Kahlua and espresso eclairs, plus all your favourite savoury snacks like croque monsieurs, almond scones, smoked salmon frittatas and pumpkin and leek muffins.   High Coffee runs all throughout June and July at Little Collins Kitchen from 1 to 3pm. It’s $59 per person on Munday to Friday and $65 per person on weekends. This includes an Espresso Martini on arrival and unlimited coffee (plus tea, if you think all that coffee will give you the jitters).

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43
Crowd scoring poetry slam contestants
Photograph: Kate Baker
Things to do, Literary events

Victorian Poetry Slam Heats

icon-location-pin Around Melbourne, Melbourne
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The search for Australia’s 2019 Poetry Slam champion is on. If you're a writer, performer, poet, creative or someone who just wants to express and voice themselves, come gather at local Victorian public libraries starting next week for the Victorian Poetry Slam Heats. Two finalists from the state will win a spot to take the stage against the country’s best wordsmiths at the Sydney Opera House later in October. The national winner will then perform internationally on an all-expenses-paid literary tour valued at $10,000, and a two-week artist residency at Bundanon Trust in New South Wales. Since 2005, the Australian Poetry Slam has uncovered local talent, shooting the careers of spoken word artists across the country. Last year’s national winner, Melanie Mununggurr-Williams, was the first Indigenous winner of the APS.  Feeling inspired? Register your interest via the State Library of Victoria’s website.

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Brickman Cities Sydney Harbour Bridge
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do, Exhibitions

Brickman Cities

icon-location-pin Scienceworks, Spotswood
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There is something fascinating about seeing a world-famous skyline recreated in tiny Lego bricks. Ryan 'the Brickman' McNaught and his team have built some of the greatest cities in the world out of bespoke Lego for a new exhibition at Scienceworks.  The cities are New York, Dubai, Tokyo, Sydney and London, and the exhibition showcases their histories for almost a thousand years, from castles and forts to skyscrapers and instantly recognisable landscapes.   The centrepiece of the exhibition is a 3m by 4m to-scale model of lower Manhattan, built out of white Lego. Stories of New York are 3D projected onto the buildings for extra insight into the city's history.  Lego fans can also have a go of building their own cities of the future in an interactive section of the exhibition.   It took more than 1,900 hours and 1 million individual Lego bricks to build the exhibition. Catch it at Scienceworks until August 4. 

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45
Photo Credit: Daniel Smith
Film

Aladdin

Twenty-seven years after the release of the animated classic, Aladdin gets the live-action treatment, with Sherlock Holmes director Guy Ritchie at the helm. The well-known plot is the stuff of Disney magic: a rags-to-riches tale in which a common thief wins the heart of a princess with the help of a magic lamp that transforms him into a prince. If today's Aladdin is not quite a scene-for-scene remake, it’s pretty close. The plot is tweaked with some sensible improvements: Agrabah, a mythical Silk Road city, was described in the original opening song as “barbaric”. It’s now simply chaotic, with a bustling population of people from as far as northern Europe (look out for Billy Magnussen’s hilarious Prince Anders) to China, and everywhere in between. It’s clear that this version of Aladdin celebrates the cultures from which the Arabian Nights folk tale emerged – a sensitivity no doubt learned (better late than never) from Black Panther, which provided an alternative to the typical white-saviour motif. Canadian-Egyptian actor Mena Massoud perfectly captures Aladdin’s street-smart charm, while British-Gujarati actress Naomi Scott gives a firecracker performance as Princess Jasmine, showing she’s less concerned with finding a husband than learning the required skills to succeed her father (Navid Negahban) to the throne. Marwan Kenzari’s Jafar verges on pantomine villainy, but there’s no denying that he cuts a menacing figure. Best of all, the film is a proudly out-and-out musica

Time Out says
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Our Bodies, Our Voices, Our Marks exhibition Immigration Museum
Photograph: Lekhena Porter/Supplied
Museums

Our Bodies, Our Voices, Our Marks

icon-location-pin Immigration Museum, Melbourne
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Get ready to open up this winter season as the Immigration Museum introduces Our Bodies, Our Voices, Our Marks, a collection of new exhibitions and experiences focusing on tattoos and the meaning behind them.  There will be two main photography exhibits that focus on the intersection between ancient and modern tattoo practices as well as a series of contemporary installations curated by tattoo artist Stanislava Pinchuk, also known as Miso.  Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World will explore the artistry and extensive history of Japanese tattoos, which has persevered despite the criminal stigma thanks to its association with the yakuza, the country’s most notorious mafia syndicate. Held in tandem with this is an exhibition exploring a traditional Samoan art form called Tatau: Marks of Polynesia, showcasing the works of both traditional tatau masters and emerging artists that are still practising this 2,000-year-old art form. Keep an eye out for a series of four installations titled Documenting the Body curated by Stanislava Pinchuk. These works will be located over all three levels of the Immigration Museum and will include works from Australian tattoo artists including Paul Stillen, Brook Andrew and Angela Tiatia.

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47
Storm Boy Melbourne Theatre Company 2019
Photograph: Supplied
Theatre, Drama

Storm Boy

icon-location-pin Southbank Theatre (Melbourne Theatre Company), Southbank
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This adaptation of Colin Thiele's classic Australian novel about a boy and his pelican previously played at Sydney Theatre Company’s Wharf Theatre. Now Queensland Theatre’s artistic director, Sam Strong, is reimagining it for MTC’s much larger Sumner Theatre. “I loved the STC production,” Melbourne Theatre Company artistic director Brett Sheehy says. “I did think it was – and I’m not using this word pejoratively – but it was a ‘boutique’ rendering. Sam has a slightly more epic vision for what that work could be.”

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See-through igloos on a Melbourne rooftop
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do, Pop-up locations

The Winter Village

icon-location-pin Federation Square, Melbourne
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Melbourne is one of Australia’s cooler cities (in more ways than one), but it’s still pretty rare to see snow within the city limits. That’s changing this winter, though, with Federation Square transforming into a frosty winter wonderland. The Skyline Terrace at Federation Square (the roof of the Fed Square car park) is home to the Winter Village: a (faux) snow-covered pop-up bar inspired by European winter markets. The pop-up is surrounded by snowy pine trees à la the Black Forest, while inside guests can enjoy an ice skating rink, 21 toasty warm private igloos and a mega igloo where it snows (inside!) every hour.  You can stave off the winter chill at Feast Kitchen and Sip Bar. There are winter-themed treats to keep you warm or you can book a private igloo and get an inclusive food and beverage package. The Winter Village is also open until late on Fridays and Saturdays so you can really chill out with local DJs and after-dark events. Keen to skate? You can book into daily 45-minute sessions every hour. Prices start at $12 for kids and $24 for adults and include skates, locker hire, kangaroo skate supports and helmets if required. The Winter Village is free to enter and is open every day until Sunday, September 1. It's open Monday to Thursday noon-10pm, Friday and Saturday 11am until midnight and Sundays 11am until 11pm. 

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49
NGV Friday Nights audience
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do

NGV Friday Nights

icon-location-pin NGV International, Southbank
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The NGV's Friday Nights series is back for another round, and this time they’re pairing a string of gigs alongside the new Terracotta Warriors: Guardians of Immortality exhibition. Few things go hand-in-hand like music and art, and NGV Friday Nights’ set-up is the best way to take in the latest NGV exhibition after dark while enjoying the best in local and international acts. Performing in the NGV's Great Hall every Friday night until mid-October, this season's line-up will feature the likes of Ngairre, Rainbow Chan, Husky, Slum Sociable, the Audreys, Young Franco, Sui Zhen and heaps more. See the full line-up on NGV's website. This year, the NGV has teamed up with the dumpling heroes at Hutong Dumpling Bar. A selection of their signature dumplings will be available to purchase at NGV Friday Nights at the NGV Gallery Kitchen. 

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Pomona Red Stitch 2019 supplied image
Photograph: Robert Blackburn
Theatre

Pomona

icon-location-pin Red Stitch Actors Theatre, St Kilda
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You’ve really got to hand it to Red Stitch for consistently bringing the best and brightest plays from overseas to our shores. Alistair McDowall’s play Pomona is no exception, receiving rave reviews when it premiered at London’s Orange Tree Theatre in 2014, before transferring to the National Theatre. It follows Ollie, whose search for her missing twin sister takes her to the sinister Pomona, an abandoned concrete island in the middle of the city where the boundaries between fiction and real life begin to unravel. Described by our mates at Time Out London as “extraordinary and virtuosic”, this production is directed by Gary Abrahams (33 Variations, Resident Alien) and stars Mona Mina Leon, Dion Mills, Arthur Angel, Jessica Clarke, Nicholas Denton, Julia Grace and Artemis Ioannides.

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51
Linden New Art sound exhibitions 2019
Mona Rujis, 'Sympathetic Resonance'
Art

Linden New Art's sound exhibitions

icon-location-pin Linden New Art, St Kilda
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Art is generally a visual medium, but Linden New Art is focusing on the ears this month, with three new exhibitions dedicated to the power of sound. In A Ripple and an Echo, artist Lucreccia Quintanilla explores the sounds of Melbourne’s built and natural environments through auditory installations that draw attention to the differences between the calls of native and introduced species. Elsewhere, the gallery is encouraging visitors to sit or lie down to fully experience the sounds and vibrations of Mona Ruijs’ gong compositions. Ruijs will also perform sound baths and meditations throughout the exhibition. Lastly, composer and musician Cat Hope has taken inspiration from Linden’s own design to create a series of unique graphic scores that will be performed live at a series of special events.

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Men in Black: International
Photo: Sony Pictures
Film, Sci-Fi

Men In Black: International

Nobody wanted this one: a reboot of a series that now feels more redundant with every galaxy-guarding wisecrack coming from the theater next door. But how fun was it back in 1997, when CGI-heavy sci-fi first collided with salt-and-pepper buddy comedy? After three films, Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones are now AWOL – probably wisely on their part – leaving the dark suits and memory-wiping neuralysers to Tessa Thompson and Chris Hemsworth, who may bring to mind their superior Thor: Ragnarok (which you probably saw and swiftly forgot about some lazy afternoon). They have little to do in a film that’s both whirlingly busy and stubbornly listless and uninspired. It won’t exactly make you hate movies, full stop, but Men in Black: International imposes such a generic dullness, it will have you seriously examining your entertainment choices. For a character that’s meant to be born and raised in Brooklyn, Thompson’s Molly, an often naïve trainee agent, represents a missed opportunity for toughness – or at least the endearing street smarts that this series used to supply on the regular. Meanwhile, if you ever wondered when Hemsworth’s surfer-bro charm would curdle into swagger, it’s now: as Molly’s new partner, Agent K, Hemsworth is almost shockingly unfunny. When, only 15 minutes in, you’re hearing boss Emma Thompson complain about their secret organisation’s gendered name (“I’ve had the conversation,” she fumes), you have no idea you’re experiencing the film’s only funny line. She di

Time Out says
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53
Much Ado About Nothing Bell Shakespeare 2019
Photograph: Pierre Toussaint
Theatre, Drama

Much Ado About Nothing

icon-location-pin Arts Centre Melbourne, Southbank
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Zindzi Okenyo will finally be front and centre where she belongs when she stars as the whip-smart Beatrice in Bell Shakespeare’s new production of Much Ado About Nothing. In case you missed reading it at school, Much Ado is pretty much the original romantic comedy, and features one of Shakespeare’s most-loved couples, Beatrice and Benedick, who banter and swap barbs until their friends decide to bring them together. Don’t expect it to be all hearts and flowers though – Bell Shakespeare associate director James Evans promises to bring out the play’s darker conflicts as well, in particular the female characters’ struggle for identity and self-knowledge in a male-dominated world. "The story flips from uproarious comedy to utter heartbreak in an instant, and then back again. That is the genius of Shakespeare, and why this play is one of my favourites,” he says. Sparring with Okenyo as Benedick will be Duncan Ragg (The Dance of Death), alongside Mandy Bishop, Will McDonald, Vivienne Awosoga, Danny Ball, Marissa Bennet, Suzanne Pereira, Paul Reichstein and David Whitney.

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Food warriors at sofitel x ngv terracotta warriors
Things to do, Food and drink

Terracotta Warriors High Tea

icon-location-pin Sofitel Melbourne, Melbourne
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To celebrate Terracotta Warriors: Guardians of Immortality, NGV’s upcoming winter exhibition, Sofitel Melbourne on Collins and Dulux are calling on the curious, the creative and the hungry for a new high tea series. Treat yourself to an Asian-inspired high tea in which guests are invited to paint chocolate Terracotta Warriors using Dulux’s signature chocolate paint. China’s terracotta sculptures date back to around the 3rd Century BCE, but the original colours have remained unknown for over 2,200 years. Think you know what they would have looked like? Have a go at painting (and then eating) your own chocolate warriors. This weekly high tea aims to unite traditional Chinese culture with the "artistic flair" of Sofitel's pastry chef David Hann. And yes, you'll finally be able to live out your childhood dream of playing with your food.  The high tea will feature an assortment of Asian-fusion dishes including smoked salmon, sweet chilli cream cheese and teriyaki sandwiches; sticky lemon, chilli and ginger beer; prawn and chive wontons; and char sui pork buns. The sweeter section includes a red bean curd white chocolate bombe on coconut shortbread; salted coconut sago with palm sugar caramel; pandan crème brûlée; crispy wontons with chocolate, ginger and pineapple; and black sesame matcha macarons.  Diners are invited to head along from 2.30pm every Saturday and Sunday starting May 25. The high tea will run until October 13 at Sofi's Lounge at Sofitel Melbourne on Collins. 

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Art

A Fairy Tale in Red Times: Works from the White Rabbit Collection

icon-location-pin NGV International, Southbank
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White Rabbit, a privately owned four-storey temple to 21st century Chinese art, is a big deal in Sydney. It shows Judith Neilson’s epic and eclectic collection to hordes of Sydneysiders every week, ranging from small-scale works to massive installations. This is the first time the collection is being shown at the NGV, with a selection of 26 artists, and several works never before seen in Australia, all of which paint a contemporary portrait of China. Highlights include Zhu Jinshi’s ‘The Ship of Time’ (2018), a massive cylinder made of 14,000 sheets of xuan paper, 1,800 pieces of fine bamboo and 2,000 cotton threads. And yes, you can walk straight through the middle of it. There’s also Mao Tongqiang’s ‘Order’ (2015), a 45 square metre piece of mirrored stainless steel embedded with 2,000 bullets fired from a gun. And Yang Jiechang’s ‘Tale of the 11th Day’ (2012–14), an epic, 20-metre silk work depicting an imagined paradise.

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Film, Drama

Never Look Away

Not to be excessively literal about that title, but when a movie – even one about Hitler Youth – is as saturated with visual gorgeousness as Never Look Away (the Oscar-nominated cinematography is by The Natural’s Caleb Deschanel), you can’t look away. That’s not exactly meant as an endorsement. German director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, maker of the slick 2006 spy drama The Lives of Others, loves seizing upon provocative ideas, and he’s not afraid to flaunt a little showmanship – or a lot of it. That means beautiful actors, hot sex scenes and, it must be said, a nagging sense of vacancy. Never Look Away comes from the biographical details of the photorealistic painter Gerhard Richter, specifically during his maturing years in various art schools in East and West Germany. (These institutions are presented a touch comically, as places for poseurs.) Playing the film’s hero, Kurt, actor Tom Schilling has the magnetism of a young truth searcher: he’s angular, he broods and he looks like a piece of sculpture himself. In a larger sense, the film is about the postwar generation of Germans desperate for a new direction, and when Henckel von Donnersmarck focuses on the artmaking, especially Richter’s hypnotic blurring technique, it’s powerful – a persuasive statement about the transformative power of representation. There’s politics and confrontation in Kurt’s work, and the film helps you understand that. Too often, though, Never Look Away plays like overheated melodrama, espe

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Mirasçılar
Film, Drama

The Heiresses

If you’re not familiar with Paraguayan cinema, that’s hardly surprising: the South American country produced a handful of films during the entire 20th century. But it only takes a single filmmaker – a Bergman, von Trier or Haneke – to put a country on the map. On the evidence of The Heiresses, director Marcelo Martinessi might be the one to do it. It took out the Sydney Film Prize at the Sydney Film Festival in 2018, and scores bonus points for being the most Bechdel test-friendly film of the year. Middle-aged couple Chela (Ava Brun) and Chiquita (Margarita Irún) have enjoyed being part of Paraguay’s wealthy elite, but straitened times mean big changes are on the way. Mounting debts lead to a spell in prison for Chiquita, treasured possessions are being sold off, and Chela resorts to running a taxi service for well-to-do women. Humiliation would appear to be all that their future holds, but venturing from her rusting gilded cage leads Chela to enjoy new freedoms, including sensual bisexual Angy (Ava Ivanova), and a future ripe with possibility. Working from his own exquisitely observed script, and interpreted by phenomenal actors with barely any screen experience, Martinessi creates a beguiling, female-centric story that has an almost Almodóvar-esque understanding of women. It’s directed with a documentarian’s sense of realism, cleverly anchored to Chela as the film’s viewpoint. It’s an assured feature debut and it isn’t too much of a stretch to see Chela’s late flowering a

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Film

John Wick 3: Parabellum

In this third installment of the adrenaline-fueled action franchise, super-assassin John Wick (Reeves) returns with a $14 million price tag on his head and an army of bounty-hunting killers on his trail. After killing a member of the shadowy international assassin's guild, the High Table, John Wick is excommunicado, but the world's most ruthless hit men and women await his every turn.

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59
Shifting Surrounds Substation 2019 supplied
Photograph: Supplied
Art

Shifting Surrounds

icon-location-pin The Substation, Newport
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ART+CLIMATE=CHANGE is a major festival all about the ways that artists are approaching climate change, with more than 30 exhibitions around Melbourne. But this exhibition of immersive projection works by Melbourne artist Yandell Walton is one of our highlights. Developed over a series of international residencies in 2017 and 2018, the exhibition explores the human relationship with our natural world and looks at how our environments are shifting. But this isn’t a dry scientific experiment; Walton’s installations are inspired by – and respond to – the architecture of the Substation, where the exhibition is being presented.

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Theatre, Drama

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

icon-location-pin Princess Theatre, Melbourne
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At long last Melbourne muggles will be able to get a glimpse inside JK Rowling's Wizarding World with their own two eyes: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is headed to the Princess Theatre. After becoming the highest selling play on both Broadway and the West End, Melbourne is the third stop on the Hogwarts Express. The official opening is set for February 23, 2019, but there'll be preview performances from January 18. If you don't know a lot about the play, then here's the lowdown: it's a sequel to the series, based on a story conceived with Rowling, John Tiffany and Jack Thorne. It's presented in two parts, which you can watch on the same day or across two consecutive evenings. We won't give too much away about the plot, but audiences can expect to find the gang 19 years on from the Battle of Hogwarts.

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61
Autocannibal Theatre Works 2019 supplied image
Photograph: Chris Bennett
Theatre

Autocannibal

icon-location-pin Theatre Works, St Kilda
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Whether it’s addiction, obesity or overconsumption, it’s fair to say that humans have a certain bent towards self-destruction. So why do we it? Performer Mitch Jones (aka Captain Ruin) was inspired to ask the question after the addiction-related death of a friend left him reeling. Struggling to cope, he began to look to his background in fetish clubs and circus as a way of examining ideas around resource depletion, environmental exhaustion and the human impulse towards destruction. Autocannibal brings these experiments together, in a one-man show that asks: what happens when we’ve consumed everything we can?

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Film, Drama

Tolkien

The Tolkien estate has pre-emptively ‘disavowed’ this biopic of fantasy great JRR Tolkien – a fancy way of letting the world know that it was made without any official help and basically boo-sucks to the filmmakers. There’ll be few regrets when its trustees see the finished film. Despite the best efforts of its committed young cast, and especially a game (if suspiciously old-looking) Nicholas Hoult as Tolkien in his late teens and early twenties, it’s a plodding and polite portrayal that holds few surprises. Don’t come for the orcs and elves, either: Tolkien is set long before The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit were published, with director Dome Karukoski flashing back from trenches of World War I, where Tolkien served, to his Tom Brown-ish school days and a chequered university career that almost ended in ignominy. Instead, he peppers the film with abrupt cutaways to imaginary CGI battles and mythological beasties to foreshadow the tales that will one day make him. None are a fraction as thrilling as the opening moments of Peter Jackson’s The Fellowship of the Ring. Tolkien is as much an origin story for his storytelling skills and genius for inventing languages as a biopic, but this literary foreshadowing is an overplayed motif. From identifying Tolkien’s three hobbit-like school chums as the blueprints for Frodo, Bilbo and co, to linking the horrors of the Great War with the Dead Marshes, Mordor and Middle Earth’s other dark corners, the beats land with the subtlety of

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63
Cheeses for cheese making class at Henry and the Fox
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do, Classes and workshops

Cheese Making Masterclass at Henry and the Fox

icon-location-pin Henry and the Fox, Melbourne
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If you've ever wanted to make your own cheese, this is the masterclass for you. Henry and the Fox is offering a series of masterclasses to teach you how to make all kinds of cheese from around the world – and yes, tasting is encouraged.  Classes offered include everything from brie to tallegio to peccorino, halloumi and mozzarella, and each class is marked with a level of difficulty.  Each class is $89 per person, and they run for three hours. The classes include a glass of chardonnay or pinot noir on arrival, plus a shared cheese board. You'll also get to take home your cheesy creations at the end. 

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TarraWarra International 2019 supplied
Photograph: Jeju Biennale
Art

Tarrawarra International 2019: The Tangible Trace

icon-location-pin TarraWarra Museum of Art, Tarrawarra
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The Yarra Valley isn’t just good for wine; it’s also home to an outstanding collection of Australian contemporary art courtesy of the TarraWarra Museum of Art in Healesville. The gallery’s latest exhibition examines the fragments we leave behind, and places works by Australian artists such as Simryn Gill and Sangeeta Sandrasegar in a more global context by hanging them alongside those by international artists such as Belgian-Mexican artist Francis Alÿs video installation 'Paradox of Praxis 5: Sometimes we dream as we live & sometimes we live as we dream, Ciudad Juárez, México'; new works by Carlos Capelán and Shilpa Gupta; and refugee Hiwa K, whose works trace his journey from Kurdistan to Germany on foot.

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Photo: Hector Alvarez
Film, Comedy

Long Shot

If you’re a filmmaker who isn’t Armando Iannucci, maybe sit the next election cycle out on the evidence of this toothless, if diverting, political comedy. Its set-up already feels a bit passé: Bob Odenkirk plays a dim US President whose only qualification for the job is having portrayed one on TV (a credential that actually makes him more qualified than the current POTUS). Intending to resign and make the ‘more prestigious’ shift to movies, he endorses Charlotte Field (Charlize Theron), his workaholic Secretary of State, whose marketing firm ranks her attributes like a Dungeon & Dragons character sheet, giving her low marks for ‘humour’. How will this Hillary-esque candidate crack the glass ceiling? By employing the speechwriting skills of Fred Flarsky (Seth Rogen), an unemployed journalist she used to babysit. Ostensibly verbal and cutting, Long Shot actually works best during its bits of physical comedy. Theron continues to prove herself a genius of ungainly moments: her podium wave has an unnatural elbow wobble that makes Elaine's dancing on Seinfeld seem smooth. And Rogen gets more mileage out of a turquoise windbreaker than you’d think possible. The central joke, briskly directed by Jonathan Levine (Warm Bodies), is that these two oddballs could somehow fall in love. It’s a gag that’s somehow insulting to both Theron and Rogen. But when Long Shot has Charlotte dropping MDMA and spacing out in an impromptu war room, it has just the right amount of irreverence. The perfo

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Revolutions exhibition - Melbourne Museum
Photograph: Lucy Hawes
Things to do, Exhibitions

Revolutions: Records and Rebels

icon-location-pin Melbourne Museum, Carlton
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There might never be another time in western history like the late 1960s. It was a time of the Beatles, the Who, the Rolling Stones, revolutions, civil rights, social justice and monumental change.  This exhibition comes from London's Victoria and Albert Museum and includes more than 500 objects. Highlights include John Lennon's real-life glasses and the suit he wore on the cover of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, handwritten lyrics for "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds", Mick Jagger's stage costume and a guitar the Who's Pete Townshend once smashed on stage. 

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Vengadores: Endgame
Photo: Marvel Studios
Film

Avengers: Endgame

Arriving with the sledgehammer momentum that only 21 previous global blockbusters can provide, Avengers: Endgame is the multiplex-rattling and curiously emotional culmination of the Marvel Cinematic Universe – at least until the next chapter. You know it’s going to be long (three hours, but there’s no need to sit out the end credits this time); you know it’s going to be high-level homework for even the most advanced fan. But what you don’t know is how deeply invested you may be in these 11 years of movies, a compendium of destruction and heroism that altered our culture but also reflected it, sometimes weightlessly, at other times grandly. Endgame often pays tribute to itself, which makes it as fascinating as it is self-serious. It taps into a live wire of epic, doomy tragedy and phoenix-like rebirth that comics do so well. Working from an intricate screenplay by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely that sometimes finds calm in the storm, the film begins (after a brief cold open for all you Hawkeye fans) just as the whole MCU did: with Robert Downey Jr’s neurotic Tony Stark grappling with his responsibilities. Downey is the actor upon which the franchise was launched, in 2008’s whiz-bang Iron Man, and there’s a symmetry to giving him the floor during Endgame’s downbeat early stretch – when it's an operatic grief drama in which half the world’s living creatures have blown away in clouds of dust. Cities are now ghost towns, dating is apparently a d

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Simon Mein
Film, Drama

Peterloo

Long, densely scripted and full of thunderous passions, Mike Leigh’s urgent grassroots epic about an infamous 1819 massacre of peaceful Manchester protestors by cavalry is a whole lot of movie. It’s meticulously crafted, every scene drawing you in with precise period detail and full-bore performances from its ensemble cast, and it powers through great slabs of British social history, finding contemporary relevance every step of the way. The iniquity of the Corn Laws, the struggle for the vote and the birth of England’s Reformist movement are all covered en route to the violent climax we know is coming. The authenticity is immersive, even if the historical exposition occasionally feels like prep for an exam no one’s warned you about. It opens with shell-shocked young bugler Joseph (newcomer David Moorst), on the shattered battlefield of Waterloo in 1815, before swiftly introducing a country where the spoils of war are shared equally between the rich and the very rich. As the Tory Prime Minister hands £250,000 to the victor of Waterloo, the Duke of Wellington, the traumatized ex-soldier returns home to Manchester to find his mother (Maxine Peake, terrific) barely able to afford bread. The tariff-fixing Corn Laws are keeping prices inflated, stiffing the city’s textile workers as farmers and landlords continue to ratchet up the profits. You don’t need to be a grassroots activist to feel the modern-day resonances. Laudably, Leigh ignores the “great man” theory of history to det

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Bingo Academy at Tokyo Tina
Photograph: Supplied
Things to do, Food and drink