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Toronto International Film Festival 2019

Follow this year’s TIFF with exclusive coverage, including reviews, news and more

Jojo Rabbit
Jojo Rabbit

Each September, the Toronto International Film Festival screens more than 300 films from over 60 countries, drawing in an estimated 400,000 attendees. Open to the public, the annual showcase features movies from all genres in cinema, including Hollywood blockbusters, indies, documentaries and foreign films. Considered to be one of the most esteemed film festivals alongside the revered Cannes Film Festival, TIFF is known for its ability to generate Academy Award buzz.

When is the Toronto Film Festival?

The 44th annual TIFF runs September 5–15, 2019.

Where is the Toronto Film Festival?

The festival takes place at various venues in Toronto, Canada.

How do I get tickets?

Buy tickets at the official festival website.

Toronto Film Festival 2019

The Personal History of David Copperfield
Movies

The Personal History of David Copperfield

Charles Dickens comes to life in a vigorous, zany adaptation that feels like a vacation for Veep creator Armando Iannucci

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Waves
Movies

Waves

A golden boy loses his footing—and a younger sister gains hers—in Trey Edward Shults’s radiant family tragedy

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Knives Out
Movies

Knives Out

Murder, skulduggery and an avalanche of plotting makes Rian Johnson's latest a pleasure for those who enjoy being dizzied

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood
Movies

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

Tom Hanks is a beaming, slightly cryptic Fred Rogers in a movie that's more about a journalist in need of a hug

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Jojo Rabbit
Movies

Jojo Rabbit

A Nazi boy befriends a fantasy Führer in Taika Waititi's audacious WWII comedy, charting its way into a tough subject

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Ford v Ferrari
Movies

Ford v Ferrari

Sponsored racecar drivers feel the need for speed in a drama goosed by star power but slackened by corporate intrigue

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
The Goldfinch
Movies

The Goldfinch

Slavishly faithful to the book's subplots but stuck in a two-and-a-half-hour brood, the film version never takes wing

Time Out says
2 out of 5 stars
Uncut Gems
Movies

Uncut Gems

Adam Sandler juggles a gambling addiction, a jewelry shop and a potential windfall in an intense high-stakes triumph

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars

Toronto Film Festival 2018

Can You Ever Forgive Me?
Movies

Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Two struggling souls come together to pull off a hoax on a world that's rejected them, in this powerhouse showcase for Melissa McCarthy and Richard E. Grant.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Widows
Movies

Widows

Oscar-winning director Steve McQueen swerves into the fast lane with an expertly plotted crime movie that’s a showcase for scrappiness.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
First Man
Movies

First Man

La La Land's Damien Chazelle turns the epochal 1969 lunar landing into a piece of breathtaking visual poetry.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Users say
3 out of 5 stars
Vox Lux
Movies

Vox Lux

The flip side to A Star Is Born, director Brady Corbet’s indie rise of a pop icon—played by a fearless Natalie Portman—is an uneven but fascinating spectacle.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2017

Our 10 favorite films from this year’s Toronto International Film Festival
Movies

Our 10 favorite films from this year’s Toronto International Film Festival

Sparkling indies, future Oscar contenders and midnight fun machines jockeyed for our attention at TIFF

Molly's Game
Movies

Molly's Game

Aaron Sorkin and Jessica Chastain pool their formidable talents to tackle a larger-than-life story that bubbles with smarts.

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Lady Bird
Movies

Lady Bird

Saoirse Ronan stars in writer-director Greta Gerwig’s semi-autobiographical drama, a film filled with the wry wisdom of distance.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
5 out of 5 stars
The Disaster Artist
Movies

The Disaster Artist

The world's worst film gets an affectionate making-of dramatization that's half as weird as the real thing.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2016

The Girl with All the Gifts
Movies

The Girl with All the Gifts

Easily the best thing to happen to the undead since 28 Days Later, this unusually thoughtful zombie film peps up tired blood with fresh ideas.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Jackie
Movies

Jackie

Commandingly complex, Natalie Portman triumphs in a real-life story pitched an an unthinkable moment of national tragedy.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Users say
4 out of 5 stars
Denial
Movies

Denial

Playwright David Hare recalls the true tale of David Irving, the Holocaust-denying historian, in a movie that's duller than its subject.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Deepwater Horizon
Movies

Deepwater Horizon

This meat-and-potatoes real-life disaster movie restages the 2010 oil-rig explosion that killed 11 men.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2015

Arabian Nights
Movies

Arabian Nights

Early in Miguel Gomes’s bawdy, brilliant, inadvisably epic new project, there’s a scene in which the director appears on screen in a panic, desperately trying to escape from his crew. Given the scope of the Tabu filmmaker’s latest undertaking, it’s easy to understand why. Furious at the crippling austerity measures that the Portuguese government imposed on its people in the summer of 2013, Gomes embarked on an opus expansive enough to convey how belt-tightening had metastasized to every corner and community of the country. The result is Arabian Nights, a gargantuan 383-minute trilogy that borrows the form of its ancient namesake but not its stories, replacing them instead with ones that Gomes has invented. By turns surreal, giddy, erotic, didactic, righteous, exhausting, boundlessly creative and a thousand and one other things, this shape-shifting colossus feels as diverse as the people of Portugal themselves.Gorgeously shot on 35mm and Super 16, this broadly allegorical saga includes segments that range from the angry satire of “The Men with a Hard-on,” in which government and IMF representatives encounter a genie who cures them of the impotence, to less-obvious episodes like “The Owners of Dixie,” in which an adorable stray dog is passed between the various residents of a suburban high-rise. (The pooch's Dante-like journey coheres into a lucid symbol for the country as a whole.) Even the most inscrutable passages of Arabian Nights are sparked by Gomes’s rage, the basis for

Time Out says
4 out of 5 stars
Office
Movies

Office

Update Mad Men to the pre-credit-crunch 2000s. Pepper it with Douglas Sirk melodrama. Set it in a stylized, hermetically sealed version of Hong Kong, with urban landscapes reimagined by way of Tron. Chuck in a brisk brace of delirious Jacques Demy musical numbers, scored to crunchy electro-glam torch songs. Shoot it in immersive 3-D. The result is one of the most intoxicatingly unusual, visually entrancing and darkly funny films of recent years.Johnnie To may be best known for ultraviolent crime thrillers like Election, Vengeance and Drug War, but Office isn’t as great a leap into the unknown as one might assume. To’s films have always been richly stylish, with an increasing focus on character, empathy and psychological insight alongside the balletic bulletry. Office simply replaces the two-gun action sequences with equally athletic song-and-dance sequences.And this isn’t just a film of high style: Thanks to a scalpel-sharp script by actor turned screenwriter Sylvia Chang—who also plays the icy office matriach alongside Chow Yun-Fat’s glowering CEO—it’s a keenly observed, spiky treatise on office politics. With catchy lyrics about making coffee for the higher-ups and the pitfalls of workplace romance, Office attacks its universal themes with claws bared. In the process, it also offers a unique take on the roots of the 2008 financial crash—basically, everyone in the financial sector was living in a gaudy, self-centered fantasy. And nearly a decade later, To suggests, very litt

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Hardcore is Toronto's first under-the-radar sensation
News

Hardcore is Toronto's first under-the-radar sensation

"Have you seen Hardcore yet?" movie snobs are asking with a shy smile at this year's TIFF

High-Rise
Movies

High-Rise

An uncompromising adaptation of a novel that might have benefited from a multifloor rehab, Ben Wheatley’s ferociously literal take on J.G. Ballard’s teetering 1975 social satire is, like Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice, an exquisite testament to cinema’s capacity to serve the written page. The first surprise is Wheatley’s decision to set the novel’s futuristic scenario—residents of a swanky apartment building devolve into class-warring savages—within the book’s mid-’70s moment. The presence of cell phones would have punctured Ballard’s fragile concept (already a little arch and dated), and the result here is gloriously retro: Fitted three-piece suits, shagadelic furnishings and a Moog-satured score by Clint Mansell make the whole film feel like a Pink Floyd album cover come to life. Adding much-needed affability is fine-boned Tom Hiddleston as Dr. Robert Laing, new to the building and caught off-guard by his sexually voracious upstairs neighbor, Charlotte (Sienna Miller). Robert is soon invited to the thug-protected penthouse where, in a surreal 40th-floor garden complete with swaying trees and a galloping horse, he meets the complex’s purring architect, Anthony Royal (Jeremy Irons), whose confidence in his “crucible of change” will come to be be shaken. Snobbery and animalistic urges eventually collide—a Ballard speciality—as the lower floors begin complaining and people start swan-diving off the balconies.Wheatley does an inspired job with the buildup to his midfilm cl

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2014

The Judge
Movies

The Judge

Robert Downey Jr. stars in the sort of legal drama that shouts where it could whisper and stomps where it could tiptoe—not always disagreeably

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
The Drop
Movies

The Drop

European actors (including future Mad Max Tom Hardy) do an uneven job bringing a "hey-yous-guys" Brooklyn crime drama to life.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
Nightcrawler
Movies

Nightcrawler

Viciously funny, it twins the frenetic hunt for shocking footage with the career ambitions of a closet psycho, played by Jake Gyllenhaal.

Time Out says
5 out of 5 stars
Tusk
Movies

Tusk

One imagines the scariest thing to Kevin Smith would be the inability to speak—and that's exactly what he explores in this captivatingly weird horror-comedy.

Time Out says
3 out of 5 stars
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Toronto Film Festival 2013

Don Jon, Blue Is the Warmest Color, Jarmusch and sex
Movies

Don Jon, Blue Is the Warmest Color, Jarmusch and sex

Our first day at the fest has sex on the brain, generously onscreen, and long after the love is gone.

12 Years a Slave
Movies

12 Years a Slave

We review the festival's first sensation, a triumph from director Steve McQueen.

Q&A: Enough Said's Julia-Louis Dreyfus
Movies

Q&A: Enough Said's Julia-Louis Dreyfus

The Seinfeld star talks about comic humiliation and working with James Gandolfini.

Dallas Buyers Club, Supermensch, Prisoners
Movies

Dallas Buyers Club, Supermensch, Prisoners

Hustlers play the odds in three studies of brinkmanship.

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Toronto Film Festival 2012

Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master
Movies

Paul Thomas Anderson's The Master

Read our first impressions after the official North American premiere.

Stories We Tell, Anna Karenina, Silver Linings Playbook
Movies

Stories We Tell, Anna Karenina, Silver Linings Playbook

David O. Russell and Sarah Polley connect as the fest heats up.

Cloud Atlas, Passion, Spring Breakers
Movies

Cloud Atlas, Passion, Spring Breakers

The fest yields a cornucopia of crazy from the Wachowskis and Brian De Palma.

Toronto International Film Festival halftime report
Movies

Toronto International Film Festival halftime report

Ambition and go-for-broke nuttiness mark the 2012 edition.

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Toronto Film Festival 2011

A preamble: the eight films we're most excited about

A preamble: the eight films we're most excited about

From a schedule aching with choices, here's what's unmissable.

Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg and heaviness

Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg and heaviness

Yes, we're chastising a therapy movie for being too talky.

Take This Waltz, Damsels in Distress and more

Take This Waltz, Damsels in Distress and more

Director Sarah Polley is still a shaper of fine performances.

Steve McQueen's Shame, a new NYC classic

Steve McQueen's Shame, a new NYC classic

And then, like that, Toronto offers up a title that makes attendance so rewarding.

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Toronto Film Festival 2010

What we're excited about

What we're excited about

Toronto halftime report

Toronto halftime report

Taking a twirl with Black Swan

Taking a twirl with Black Swan

Let's give a hand to James Franco

Let's give a hand to James Franco

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Toronto Film Festival 2009

The Toronto International Film Festival: A prelude

The Toronto International Film Festival: A prelude

Megan Fox shows off Body

Megan Fox shows off Body

Jason Reitman, stepping Up

Jason Reitman, stepping Up

Kvelling over the Coen brothers

Kvelling over the Coen brothers

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