Get us in your inbox

Search
Fumi
Photograph: Courtesy Fumi

Best sushi restaurants in Hong Kong

From affordable to downright luxurious, here are our top picks to get your sushi fix.

https://d32dbz94xv1iru.cloudfront.net/customer_photos/e29dc0f6-4bfc-4f90-b065-eb2dcd8dc8e5.jpg
Written by
Time Out Hong Kong
&
Fontaine Cheng
Advertising

There's no denying that Hong Kong loves its Japanese food, be it ramentsukemen and even matcha desserts, we are obsessed. As for our love of sushi, well, a testament to that is the broad selection of restaurants dedicated to this bite-sized seafood rice delicacy across the city. From high-end establishments offering luxurious sushi options to affordable venues with quality sushi, we have it all. But if you want to avoid getting a raw deal, read on for our list of the best sushi restaurants in Hong Kong.

RECOMMENDED: Think you'll have room for dessert? Check out our list of the best ice cream in Hong Kong.

Where to get the best sushi in the city

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Tsim Sha Tsui

Sushiyoshi is the first branch outside Japan of Osaka’s two-Michelin starred Sushiyoshi. Chef-owner Nakanoue Hiroki is known for bringing western ingredients and techniques to his Japanese cooking, as evidenced by dishes such as the uni gougère or uni and caviar with creamy scrambled egg, among others. For a full taste of what Sushiyoshi has to offer, we recommend going for omakase, which ranges from lunch ($1,280), dinner ($2,480), and chef's special menu ($3,480). Staying true to its roots, Sushiyoshi has proven a hit in Hong Kong, continually offering diners a playful and exciting sushi experience.

  • Restaurants
  • Causeway Bay

The chefs at Sushi Hiro work in the centre of the U-shaped bar and only the freshest fish is on display at this Causeway Bay sushi haven. It tastes great, and is reasonably priced for the quality on offer here. There are a la carte offerings that feature all the favourites including salmon ($40 per piece) and sea urchin ($80 per piece), as well as assorted sushi plates (from $410) and a 12 piece sushi course ($640).

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Central

At Fumi, diners can experience the different flavours of Japan without shelling out for a plane ticket to the country. From behind the sushi counter, the chefs serve up carefully crafted dishes, all made with fresh ingredients that are flown in straight from the shores and markets of Japan. The highlights of the restaurant include the multi-course omakase and kaiseki menus, which are updated on a regular basis. These feature seasonal meats, fish and produce from various prefectures, such as Miyazaki beef or creamy uni from Hokkaido. To complement the food, Fumi offers a wide selection of exclusive wines and sakes. Sushi platters range from $348 to $658.

  • Restaurants
  • Central

This two Michelin-starred restaurant at the Four Seasons is overseen by revered sushi master Takashi Saito. He hand picks the finest and freshest cuts of all your favourite fish and has them shipped in daily from Toyosu Market in Tokyo. From adventurous sushi offerings to expertly done classics including toro, salmon, you name it – you can enjoy it all here in the most authentically Japanese surroundings. Omakase ranges from $1,780 for lunch and $3,280 for dinner.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Causeway Bay

This sushi haven in Causeway Bay serves up delicious omakase dishes that are about a lot more than just raw fish and rice. One of the more interesting ingredients include cod milt but there are also decadent items such as abalone and toro as well. The sushi actually follows a long line of appetisers, so bring your appetite. Omakase at Sushi Gin ranges from $1,680 to $1,280.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Yuen Long

Sushi Man brings a taste of Japan to the New Territories. It’s one of the more expensive options in Yuen Long, but when you consider that each piece of sushi and sashimi is handmade to be eaten within seconds by each diner, and the quality of the ingredients – almost 90% imported from Japan – it’s good value. The restaurant is best known for its uni bowls, which are very generous, filled with mounds of fresh urchin and shrimp. It’s worth going for the highest priced omakase menu but it will set you back over $1000, so come prepared.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Sushi
  • Sheung Wan

Stepping off Hollywood Road into Umi is the closest you’ll get in Hong Kong to an intimate Tokyo sushi bar. The 10-seat sushi counter offers an exquisite traditional Edomae sushi experience. First, order the truffle rice, then sit back and let the chefs take you on a journey, as they explain the delicate flavours of each course to you in an unstuffy, affable manner intended to educate rather than intimidate. Omakase is available at $988 for lunch and $1,888 for dinner.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Central

Michelin-starred omakase empire Sushi Zo's Tai Kwun branch, is a place where master chefs turn out personalised multi-course meals to lucky guests. The restaurant flies in fresh fish from Japan each day: buttery red snapper, thinly sliced scallops, succulent fatty tuna and much, much more, all made to be consumed within seconds of it appearing before you. The experience will set you back around $2,500, but if you can swing it, you’re in for a rare treat.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Sushi
  • Central
  • price 4 of 4

Hong Kong's first three-Michelin-starred sushi restaurant has relocated to the seventh floor of the Landmark Mandarin Oriental, joining the hotel's original Michelin-lauded superstar, Amber. The team at Sushi Shikon performs culinary magic with fresh, high-end ingredients procured from Tokyo’s fresh fish markets. But this isn't only a stellar dining experience; it's a one-of-a-kind cultural experience as well: two-hour meals at an eight-seat Hinoki counter, putting sushi chef and guests at exceptionally close proximity to one another. Lunch omakase goes for $2,000 while dinner is available at $3,500.

  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Causeway Bay

Kura opened in Causeway Bay at the end of 2019 as a worthy newcomer to the list of great sushi restaurants in Hong Kong. The attention to detail of the head chef – who trained fastidiously in Japan and then worked at Ta-ke before opening this venture – is great, and his comfort in the ways of washoku is evident as the restaurant adds some idiosyncratic twists to some of its such offerings. We particularly recommend the raw shrimp sushi sprinkled with black truffle. Lunch omakase goes for about $980 while dinner omakase starts from around $1,180.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Japanese
  • Tin Hau

Tai Hang’s Sushi Hana is a rare omakase restaurant run by a Hongkonger. Chef Lawrence Mok believes you don’t have to be Japanese to understand the cuisine. He proved that by earning sister restaurant I M Teppanyaki & Wine a Michelin star. This slightly more reasonable sibling doesn’t disappoint, either, serving up a seasonal multi-course experience of the freshest sushi and sashimi, expertly prepared and beautifully plated. Lunch sets start from $420 while the Hana course filled with seven kinds of sashimi and 8 pieces of sushi is around $1,980. 

  • Restaurants
  • Kowloon Tong

We get a little weary when we have to recommend conveyor belt sushi spots because they really can be hit or miss. However, chain sushi spot Sen-ryo is pretty consistent most of the time and for days when you're really craving sushi, it does the job to hit the spot and even leaves you with some change in the pocket. They currently have a summer menu running which features three sought after ingredients: fresh Bafun sea urchin, meaty abalone and fatty striped jack that comes to the table as sashimi and sushi, and is definitely worth trying this season.

Where to eat next

Advertising
Recommended
    You may also like
      Advertising