Worldwide icon-chevron-right Asia icon-chevron-right Hong Kong icon-chevron-right The 52 best restaurants in Hong Kong you have to try

The 52 best restaurants in Hong Kong you have to try

From seasoned stalwarts to the hottest newcomers, these restaurants are our favourite places to eat in Hong Kong right now

By Time Out editors |
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The Eat List

OCTOBER 2019: As our city’s vibrant restaurant scene continues to evolve at a rapid pace, we’ve made more than a few additions to our list this time around. Most notably, the new-in-town French cuisine maestros at Louise have stormed in to take the coveted top spot, and we’ve also welcomed to the pack visionary French-Japanese fusion eatery à nu retrouvez-vous, laidback Vietnamese spot Chôm Chôm, and down-to-earth noodle paradise, Mak Man Kee, among others.

Welcome to the Time Out EAT List, for which we’ve been busy scouring the streets and alleys to bring you the very best restaurants in Hong Kong. As usual, this line-up has been compiled by our ravenous food and drinks editors who aren’t just on the hunt for a delectable bite – although taste certainly doesn’t count for nothing – but also consider the buzziness of the atmosphere, the price (for those on a tight budget, check out our dedicated cheap eats list), and the relevance of the concept in our ever-changing metropolis. 

From long-time favourites to newbies, we've sorted everything, from restaurants in some of Hong Kong’s best hotels to the city's most delectable street eats. In short, this is whatever serves the best food in Hong Kong right now. Let’s dig in!

Eaten somewhere on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutEatList

Looking for more recent openings? Check out our pick of Hong Kong's best new restaurants.

Best restaurants in Hong Kong

1
louise - maman royer yogurt cake
Ann Chiu
Restaurants, French

Louise

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

When Julien Royer announced his intentions to open his first venue outside of Singapore in Hong Kong, fresh off his flagship restaurant Odette being crowned Asia’s best in early 2019, he promised a more down-to-earth experience. Not just for diners – who in today’s fast-paced, focus-deficient world are demanding a less stuffy and formal brand of fine dining – but for himself as well. Louise was meant to be a tribute to his upbringing, a chance to champion heritage recipes born out of his nostalgia for family meals on the farm in Cantal, France. It’s all that and more. Dining at Louise does feel like dining at a family member’s house, if your family owned a plantation and this was French Indochina. The food is hearty and approachable, the wine list long and exceptional, and the design, devised by architect André Fu, at once subtropical, opulent and playful. Fu turned the Grade II historic building at PMQ previously occupied by Aberdeen Street Social into a fictional private home. The ground-floor bar and casual dining space, which serves drinks and light bites all day and night, is awash in jungle green, false bird-of-paradise carpet and paintings that depict vaguely familiar island scenery. The second-floor dining room, where you’ll sit down to lunch or dinner, features a warm colour scheme infused with splashes of goldenrod and bone white. Rattan plays a big role, too – in the seating, in the geometric patterns adorning the ceiling, in the wicker-like weave of the carpet.

2
Yardbird table spread
Restaurants, Japanese

Yardbird

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

Even after nearly seven years in the business, Yardbird attracts diners by the hordes, thanks to being the kind of super hip izakaya/yakitori venue that not even Tokyo denizens would roll their eyes at. The chicken here is treated no differently than the finest piece of toro, that is, with love and care. And it returns the favour by donating literally every part of its body including the thigh, wing, neck, liver, tail or skin.

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3
otto e mezzo interior
Restaurants, Italian

8½ Otto e Mezzo Bombana

icon-location-pin Central

Dubbed the ‘king of truffles’, chef Umberto Bombana whips up rustic, truffle laden Italian dishes while embodying the essence of Italian hospitality through his venues’ exceptional service. Expect things like homemade Cavatelli shellfish ragout and sea urchin, Tajima short rib and beef tenderloin with a red wine, plum sauce and whipped potato.

4
Aulis - Sea urchin custard with our caviar
Restaurants

Aulis

icon-location-pin Causeway Bay

British chef Simon Rogan breaks into the Hong Kong dining scene with the opening of Aulis in Causeway Bay. Already in Cartmel (where it’s housed next to Rogan’s two-Michelin starred L'Enclume) and London, Aulis is touted as a development kitchen for Rogan and his team to experiment in. In an intimate chef’s table setting that seats up to 12 guests, the Hong Kong location offers multicourse tasting menus that change on a regular basis to showcase seasonal produce and the breadth of the kitchen team’s creativity.

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5
Restaurants, French

Caprice

icon-location-pin Central

Chef Guillaume Galliot whisks guests into the world of French gastronomy using the finest ingredients to create the most sensuous flavours. On the menu are dishes like Alaskan king crab with oysters, prawn jelly and caviar. The restaurant has a fantastic French artisanal cheese collection and, naturally, an extensive wine list focusing mostly on Bordeaux and Burgundy.

6
belon interior
Restaurants, Contemporary Global

Belon

icon-location-pin Central

The sleek yet minimal interior of Belon is intentional, allowing the dishes to really do the talking. Helmed by British chef Daniel Calvert, dishes include a wonderfully fresh oyster tartare, chickpea falafel with hummus, pigeon pie, whole roasted chicken and many more. 

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7
Islam Food
Restaurants

Islam Food

icon-location-pin Kowloon City

People come from all corners of Hong Kong for a helping of the Islamic ‘beef burgers’. They also come here for the lamb curry and beef brisket noodles. Cheap as chips and tasty as hell if you’re willing to wait for a table.

8
Ecriture
Restaurants, French

Ecriture

icon-location-pin Central

Following the success of the art-themed restaurant Bibo and award-winning The Ocean by Olivier Bellin, dining group Le Comptoir raises the bar yet again with Ecriture at H Queen’s. A French fine-dining venue named after renowned Korean artist Park Seo-Bo’s groundbreaking abstract expressionist series, Ecriture attempts to emulate Park through bold colours and designs that rely heavily on shapes and lines. With the restaurant’s open kitchen in the centre and floor-to-ceiling windows, diners can experience stunning views to go with the French culinary art. 

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9
The Chairman
Restaurants

The Chairman

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

Lauded as one of the best restaurants in Asia, The Chairman has been popular ever since it opened nearly 10 years ago. Why? Suppliers who offer the best seasonal produce – and it’s mostly organic at that – and no MSG. If there’s one thing you must try it’s the pigeon with longjing tea and chrysanthemum, a classic dish that’s never left the menu.

10
Madame Fu
Restaurants

Madame Fu

icon-location-pin Central

Similar to Dragonfly, Madame Fu is not simply a restaurant, but an experience, complete with a compelling backstory that centres on its namesake heroine. Playing up to the colonial stylings of the former Central Police Station compound, the venue channels an east-meets-west ethos that pays tribute to the fictional Madame Fu – a socialite who opened a grand salon in Shanghai in the 1930s after living in Paris. At a sprawling 8,000sq ft, the space encompasses the main dining room (the Grand Café), bar area, whisky lounge, private rooms and two open-air verandahs. Expect to enjoy modern Cantonese-focused Chinese fare here, as well as western desserts and afternoon tea sets.

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11
new punjab club spread
Restaurants, Indian

New Punjab Club

icon-location-pin Central

  Wyndham Street. It’s a bit of a mixed bag. The likes of Hooters rubs shoulders with establishments of more class such as Stockton and Ori-gin. Joining them is New Punjab Club, a restaurant that focuses on dishes from the Punjab region of India and Pakistan, which centres around tandoor oven cooking rather than thick curries.Styled with intricate rattan details, patterned walls and Indian and Pakistani artwork, the atmosphere is of a mid-20th century post-colonial Punjab gentlemen’s club. Helming the kitchen is chef Palash Mitra, formally of one Michelin-starred Gymkhana in London.As we peruse the menu, to the sounds of a quirky playlist, a cheeky chappy waiter wheels over the gin and tonic cart with a wry grin – we weren't planning to drink. He's not having it. Once we’re done whetting our whistles with these mellow apéritifs (the drinks start from $138), we order a samosa chaat ($98) and tandoori machli ($218) – cobia fish with tomato chutney. The samosa chaat is comforting, smoky and creamy all at once, the smashed samosas are smothered in a tamarind glaze and yoghurt, with satisfying pop provided by pomegranate seeds. It's also pleasantly spicy, something of a rarity among similar restaurants in Hong Kong. The oily fish is simply delicious, coated in a thick and fatty charred skin that hides buttery meat. The chutney is a little bitter, so we steer clear of it and let the fish shine on its own.  For mains, we go for the murgh tikka angar ($248) – yoghurt and spice mar

12
Restaurants, Scandinavian

Frantzén’s Kitchen

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

Chef Björn Frantzén holds the accolade of owning one of only two restaurants in Stockholm to boast two Michelin stars. His eponymous eatery, Frantzén, is the height of fine dining in the Scandinavian country’s capital city. Lucky us, then, that this culinary maestro’s first venture outside of his native land has just landed in our SAR. Frantzén’s Kitchen looks the part on Upper Station Street, a sleepy nook of Sheung Wan that’s no stranger to award-winning gastronomic venues. One Michelin-starred Wagyu Kaiseki Den is just round the corner and former holder of a star, Upper Modern Bistro, is but a few steps away. Read more: In the kitchen with Chef Björn Frantzén Melding Nordic and Asian cuisines, Jim Löfdahl, previously head chef at Frantzén, helms the new joint, crafting a Scando niche. Only, really, Jaakko Sorsa’s Nordic venue, Finds, in Tsim Sha Tsui has effectively managed to do this since it opened 12 years ago. So we head off to Frantzén’s Kitchen to see what the Swedes have to offer. And we’re pleased to find a casual vibe at the restaurant, with a simple and sleek interior. There’re no Ikea comparisons to be made, as much as we want to. This place has all the benefits of Scandinavian-chic without the DIY furniture. A greyish teal dominates the colour scheme and there’s floor-to-ceiling windows, some outdoor-facing chairs, a few dining tables and seats at the open kitchen, which is where we sit. We watch Löfdahl and his staff and it’s utterly fascinating. They’re ca

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13
Arbor
Restaurants, French

Arbor

icon-location-pin Central

One of the most exciting restaurants at H Queen’s is Arbor, a French fine-dining restaurant with chefs Nicolas Boutin and Eric Räty at the helm. Serving innovative dishes in a forest themed surroundings, Arbor makes for a perfect tranquil getaway in the heart of Central. You can also wind down with a brunch every weekend as well before heading over to the art galleries downstairs. 

14
VEA food shot
Restaurants, French

VEA

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

VEA stands for Vicky et Antonio – chef Vicky Cheng, the visionary chef formerly of Liberty Private Works, and Antonio Lai, the legendary bartender behind The Envoy and decorated establishments Origin and Quinary. There’s only a tasting menu on offer at the one Michelin star venue and it is recommended to pair it with Lai's fantastic cocktails.

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15
sushi shikon red fish
Restaurants, Sushi

Sushi Shikon

icon-location-pin Central

A three-Michelin star restaurant of the highest quality. An intimate dining experience with just an eight-seat sushi counter (excluding the special private room for six), Sushi Shikon imports all its ingredients twice daily from Japan, ensuring the best quality. Pull up your chair at the counter and marvel at chef Kakinuma’s skill as he prepares each dish before your eyes.

16
Restaurants

Ronin

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

Ronin carries the same Yardbird stamp of warm service and swingy, anything-goes vibe, and has amped the class up a bit with fancier finger foods, fancier drinks and even a fancier dim mirrored bathroom that could give Dragon-i a run for its money.

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17
Ichu Peru - Pargo al Rocoto
Restaurants

Ichu Peru

icon-location-pin Central

South American cuisine in Hong Kong has been on the rise thanks to the popularity of restaurants like Buenos Aires Polo Club, Brickhouse and La Pampa. And joining the club is Ichu Peru. As you can tell from its name, Ichu brings Hong Kong a range of excellent, authentic Peruvian food. The excitement doesn’t end there, the anticipated restaurant is also led by Peruvian chef Virgilio Martínez Véliz, the recipent of the coveted Chef’s Choice Award 2017 at The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. 

18
Kytaly
© TseChiChung
Restaurants, Pizza

Kytaly

icon-location-pin Central

Regarded as one of the greatest pizza-masters in the industry right now, Franco Pepe brings his Geneva-based brand to Soho for the very first time. In a terraced, open-kitchen space on Wyndham Street, Kytaly offers more than a dozen different pizzas, as well as Italian salads and desserts. Another reason to visit? The venue boasts the city’s first Campari bar, meaning that it does a mean negroni.

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19
Mott 32 char siu dish
Restaurants, Chinese

Mott 32

icon-location-pin Central

Mott 32’s Joyce Wang-designed interior is a sight to behold, the former bank vault reimagined as a storage facility for family heirlooms forgotten by wealthy Chinese immigrants. Items like a giant abacus and calligraphy pens act as clues to the larger political and social history of Hong Kong. The design is striking but the food, such as the excellent siu mai and Iberico char siu, is just as sure to please.

20
ho le fook toast and goose
Noah Fecks
Restaurants

Ho Lee Fook

icon-location-pin Soho

Serving up quirky Chinese cuisine with pan-Asian and European influences, Ho Lee Fook boasts a trendy interior and excellent modern Canto fare that keeps the lines outside long, though it’s worth the wait. Try Mom’s ‘mostly cabbage, a little bit of pork’ dumplings with sacha soy dressing and the awesome cha siu pork. Wash it all down with one of the restaurant’s funky cocktails.

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21
Tim Ho Wan
Restaurants

Tim Ho Wan

icon-location-pin Sham Shui Po

Yes, Tim Ho Wan may be a cliché go-to for tourists but it has become famous for good reason. One of the cheapest Michelin-starred restaurants in the world, the service is perfunctorily but the dim sum is gold-standard. We recommend visiting the Sham Shui Po outpost and ordering just about everything. No trip is complete without tucking into second – and perhaps third – helpings of the restaurant’s renowned baked cha siu bao.

22
Yan Toh Heen
Restaurants, Chinese

Yan Toh Heen

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

A long-time favourite at the Intercontinental Hong Kong, Yan Toh Heen has undergone a major makeover as it’s moved into a new harbourfront location within the hotel. Aside from boasting jaw-dropping views, the new space also features a gorgeous interior, which includes a hand-carved jade corridor and silk screens with floral embroidery. It’s the perfect setting to enjoy the restaurant’s delicious Cantonese dishes – many of which are made with globally sourced and seasonal ingredients – as well as specialty brews selected and prepared by Yan Toh Heen’s very own tea sommelier.

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23
Bo Innovation
Restaurants

Bo Innovation

icon-location-pin Wan Chai

Home to a fusion of traditional and new world Chinese cuisine, the food at Bo Innovation is intelligent, humorous and thoroughly thought out. Culinary excellence abounds and the service is beyond anything one ordinarily expects in Hong Kong.

24
Lung King Heen
Restaurants, Chinese

Lung King Heen

icon-location-pin Central

This Chinese restaurant was the first in the world to be awarded three Michelin stars and it’s not hard to see why. Chef Chan Yan-tak and his team create the most delicate pieces of dim sum, as well as perfectly steamed seafood dishes, nourishing double-boiled soups and delicious seasonal ingredients.

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25
Ser Wong Fun. Credit: City Foodsters, Creative Commons Attribution Licence.
Restaurants

Ser Wong Fun

icon-location-pin Central

Hailed as one of the oldest and greatest Cantonese restaurants in the city, Ser Wong Fun not only impresses food lovers with its exquisite selection of traditional cuisine and snake soup, but its clay pot rice is equally delicious. The pig liver sausage and chicken clay pot rice is definitely a must-try during the cold winter months.

26
Roganic
Restaurants

Roganic

icon-location-pin Causeway Bay

Following the launch of its development kitchen, Aulis, in Causeway Bay, renowned British chef Simon Rogan unveils his second restaurant here on our shores with the opening of Roganic. Much like the original Roganic in London, which currently holds one Michelin star, the Hong Kong outpost aims to be a farm-to-table destination for urban-dwellers by offering fresh ingredients and natural wines in a contemporary space. 

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27
Restaurants, Chinese

Chilli Fagara

icon-location-pin Soho

In 2005, third-generation restaurateur Tracy Wong established this Sichuan restaurant. Now, it’s one of the best in the city. Authentic cooking based on recipes that have been passed down through the generations is the order of the day here. ‘Ma’ Sichuan peppercorns feature prominently, as do spicy ‘la’ dishes and vibrant ‘tang’ dishes. A real fiery feast.

28
Hanare
Restaurants, Japanese

Hanare

icon-location-pin Central

The team that brought Sushi Saito and Yakiniku Jumbo to our shores opens yet another high-end concept. The venue is set to be one of the most exclusive restaurants in town with only nine seats at the chef’s table, where guests – at last those lucky enough to get a reservation – can enjoy a kaiseki meal centred around premium Japanese wagyu.

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29
Chôm Chôm
Photo: Noah Fecks
Restaurants, Vietnamese

Chôm Chôm

icon-location-pin Soho

With lauded chef John Nguyen at the helm, this Hanoi-inspired bar and eatery brings the Vietnamese tradition of bia hoi (drinking beer with friends on a busy street corner) to Peel Street in the heart of Soho. The atmosphere here, especially come weekend, is buzzing, as patrons sit on roughly-fashioned seats – in true Hanoi style – on the establishment's patio, while wafts of the delicious food being cooked up in the kitchen seap out onto the street. The menu is full of traditional Vietnamese delights with a modern twist, and promises visitors an equally pleasant dining and drinking experience.

30
Birdie Hong Kong yakitori
Restaurants, Yakitori

Birdie

icon-location-pin Central

The latest venue from the 298HK group (298 Nikuya, Porker) shifts the focus from yakiniku to yakitori. Based on name alone, it should be obvious what you're getting yourself into: lots of grilled chicken, from livers and hearts to smoky, crispy skin, thighs and wings. Apart from the bird, the restaurant offers a few succulent cuts of pork belly and Japanese beef as well. And there's a decent selection of sake, shochu and highballs to wash it all down.

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31
For Kee
Restaurants, Chinese

For Kee

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

Locals swear by this Hong Kong-style joint on Hollywood Road that offers a wide selection of everything pork chop. Well-marinated with a subtle hint of sweetness, For Kee’s chops are said by diners to taste just the way it does over in Macau.

32
samsen boat noodles thai
Restaurants, Thai

Samsen

icon-location-pin Wan Chai

Chef Adam Cliff's take on Thai street food is a step above other such restaurants in Hong Kong, but without hurting the bank balance. The food remains true to its origins but with a few tweaks. The generous bowl of wagyu beef boat noodles with crunchy topping is a must-try, and the desserts are also impressive, using lots of fresh fruit and homemade ice creams.

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33
Ryota Kappou Modern
Restaurants, Japanese

Ryota Kappou Modern

icon-location-pin Central

This high-end Japanese restaurant is headed by chef Ryota Kanesawa, formerly of Zuma and the Michelin-starred La Frasca restaurant in Italy. The centerpiece here is the chef’s counter, from where Kanesawa and his team prepare and serve seasonal sashimi and sushi, as well as sophisticated cooked dishes.

34
haku tartare
Restaurants, Japanese

Haku

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

A collaboration between chef Hideaki Matsuo of the three Michelin starred Kashiwaya in Osaka and executive chef Agustin Balbi, formerly executive chef at Repulse Bay restaurant The Ocean, Haku serves modern Japanese cuisine with a European edge. Despite being based in Harbour City – that well known centre of high-end dining ­– the restaurant looks gorgeous, done up in a style of Japanese minimalist chic. Although there’s an a la carte menu, we opt for the eight-course tasting menu – at $1,380 it’s not cheap but it includes most of the a la carte options we fancy. First to arrive are oysters from Fukuoka topped with yuzu kosho and green apple granita. The kosho is too salty and the granita flavourless, resulting in freezing cold oysters that aren’t allowed to let their natural flavours shine. The Japanese tomatoes with Bellota ham is an improvement. The sweet, juicy pops of tomato pairs well with some delicious barracuda fish, of which we wish there was more as three tiny chunks doesn’t quite cut it. The third course, foie gras with lotus roots chips, is fab. Creamy foie gras that isn’t too gamey comes topped with fresh Sicilian cherries, paired with extra crunchy tempura squid ink lotus root chips. Just when we think we’re on the right track things swerve off course again. The Hokkaido uni on brioche with eggplant and red miso has quality urchin, but that's all we can taste. The next two courses – oxtail croquettes, and tartare of fatty tuna and Polmard beef topped with Kr

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35
Unakyu foie gras
Restaurants, Japanese

Okra

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

There are many avenues to success in Hong Kong’s dynamic culinary scene. There’s star power, either Michelin stars or a celebrity chef who fronts the restaurant. There’re traditionalists, those eateries famous for sticking to the classics and refining their preparation and presentation to perfection. And then there’s the maverick approach the brainchild of a chef who’s travelled the world picking up inspiration and wants to showcase his/her prowess with an original concept. Sometimes these ventures succeed – Yardbird, Upper Modern Bistro, Duddell’s and Little Bao – but often they fall by the wayside. Okra is of the latter approach. An original concept restaurant near the Sai Ying Pun MTR exit on Queen’s Road West, it’s opened to a slew of Instagram buzz, but can it succeed where so many others have failed? The entrance is a beautiful mosaic patterned on the cross-section of an okra plant. The inside space is a narrow corridor with bar seats facing an open kitchen where the chef serves counter-side.We’re no longer enamoured with Okra’s done-to-death shared plates concept, but the idea has introduced some tasty – albeit pricey – bites to our town, so we leave our prejudice at the door. Classing themselves as ‘Japanese reinvented’, our host for the evening, Daniel Garner, has been a chef at Nobu outposts around the world. If you want someone who knows how to push the limits of Japanese cuisine, it doesn’t get much better than a Nobu alumni. The menu is separated into A-sides fo

36
Restaurants

Grand Hyatt Steakhouse

icon-location-pin Wan Chai

In a fast-paced city like Hong Kong, the “out with the old and in with the new” syndrome seems almost like a natural-as-you-like daily mantra. But when the “old” is a legendary establishment like Club JJ’s at the Grand Hyatt, then the “new” better be good enough to fill its shoes. Thankfully the Grand Hyatt Steakhouse manages to do just that. Taking over the former JJ’s and Thai & Grill space, the new restaurant is outfitted with a classic Hollywood movie set in mind. Dark woods, leather banquettes and heavy drapery make the backbone of the interior. The main dining room overlooks the hotel mezzanine level while several smaller areas (including two private rooms) offer a more intimate dining experience. A towering art deco statue stands centre stage of the main bar, surrounded by oil paintings, tulip lights and a long salad station. It’s grand, but not garish. And in a refreshing move, the sound system streams 70s rock classics (imagine The Rolling Stones and Fleetwood Mac with your beef) instead of looping The Best of Sinatra. With the food, the menu is simple – no fanciful, foamy dishes or fusion touches – just straight-up, stripped-down, classic American steakhouse cuisine. To start, the seafood platter ($850 for two) heaps together half a Maine lobster, cracked king crab legs, clams, mussels, prawns and an assortment of oysters lazing on the half shell (including Fine de Claire, Coffin Bay and Belon on the night we visited). Short of a slightly over-boiled lobster, every

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37
Mak Man Kee
CS
Restaurants

Mak Man Kee Noodle Shop

icon-location-pin Jordan

This no-frills noodle joint has been lauded by no less than the Michelin Guide, and deservedly so. The noodles are made fresh every day with duck eggs, giving them a light, springy texture, and the wonton wrappers are so wafer-thin you can see the shrimp almost bursting through them. The soup is boiled for five hours too, imparting some extra flavour via the broth.

38
One Dim Sum
Restaurants, Chinese

One Dim Sum

icon-location-pin Prince Edward

Dim Sum doesn’t have to be pricy, it just has to be tasty. And the fare at One Dim Sum is both those things. All the classics are here inside this small, ever-bustling Prince Edward space, from har gow and siu mai to turnip cakes and char siu bao. There are boatloads of dumplings to try, plus ribs and spring rolls and rice rolls and, oh, just about everything. Best of all, you rarely fork out more than $20 for each offering.

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39
Tin Lung Heen
Restaurants, Chinese

Tin Lung Heen

icon-location-pin West Kowloon

Incredible dim sum up in the clouds. That’s what you get at this Michelin-starred eatery 102 floors up the ICC in Kowloon. The highest Chinese restaurant in the city knocks up incredible dim sum creations like pan-fried turnip cake with XO chilli sauce, baked oyster tart with black pepper and onions, and baked abalone puff with roasted goose and dried bonito.

40
Spring Moon
Restaurants, Chinese

Spring Moon

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

The art deco style of this Peninsula restaurant gives it a super-classy atmosphere and complements the top quality dim sum on the menu, like the steamed shrimp dumplings with bamboo shoots. Also enjoy authentic Cantonese dishes such as the pan-fried garoupa fillet and the superior bird’s nest and shredded bean curd soup. There’s nothing quite like Spring Moon when it comes to grandeur and taste. 

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41
uma nota dumplings
Restaurants, Fusion

Uma Nota

icon-location-pin Soho

I don’t like to make obvious comparisons, but I was skeptical when Brazilian-Japanese kitchen Uma Nota opened it’s doors on Peel Street. The city’s only other Brazilian-Japanese restaurant, Djapa, being visually assaulting and uninspiring on the palate. Uma Nota draws inspiration from São Paulo’s Liberdade district, home to the largest Japanese community outside of Japan itself, and successfully redeems Hong Kong’s Brazilian-Japanese offerings on a Corcovado scale. Inspired by the street vendors of Liberdade, the menu features unpretentious dishes with a street food bent rather than fusion fare.Uma Nota’s intention is to be a modern ‘boteco’, a meeting place for free-spirited fun seekers looking for good food and drinks. Thus, the restaurant is spacious and well lit, affording a vibe fit for any kind of gathering from dates to mates and everything in between. Decor is modern and funky, with windows that open out onto adjacent Hollywood Road.The menu is packed with meaty, heavy offerings, plus some solid seafood options like tuna picadito with chili and sriracha sweet sauce on a fried tortilla – perfectly fresh with a welcome crunch. I can’t say no to skewers, so opted for the squid with spring onion sauce, a ridiculously tender bite with just enough bounce to keep my teeth in business.The standout was the jaba com jerimun, Brazilian jerk beef with pumpkin and butter fried onions and sweet peppers. It’s every bit tasty as it sounds, with rich stringy beef complimenting the swe

42
Kam’s Roast Goose
Restaurants

Kam’s Roast Goose

icon-location-pin Wan Chai

Simple and effective, Kam's Roast Goose’s focuses on a highly edited offering – roast goose and char siu, a variety of soy marinated ‘lo shui’ meats and offals. Everything is top quality.

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43
à nu retrouvez-vous
Ann Chiu
Restaurants, Fusion

à nu retrouvez-vous

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

The name of this Michellin-starred French-Japanese fusion restaurant literally translates as "just as is", and this is exactly the concept behind the food here. Despite concocting an impressively delicious selection of dishes, the concept of the restaurant it to not alter too much of the original flavour of the food, thus allowing the natual interplay of flavours to shine through. The restaurant carefully selects seasonal ingredients from all over Japan and has them delivered directly to Hong Kong every morning. In order to ensure that the dishes every day are different, the restaurant uses a daily meal order, which is based on the season and the seasonal ingredients of the day, all of which makes for a unique dining experience.  

44
Lan Fong Yuen
Restaurants

Lan Fong Yuen (Central)

icon-location-pin Central

It’s more than 52 years old and that’s down to one simple thing: the pantyhose. The secret to Lan Fong Yuen’s signature milk tea has been straining the brew through, you guessed it, a pair of pantyhose for an extra smooth taste. It’s also one of the most well-known pork chop bun hotspots in the city. The signature chop is marinated and packed full of flavour, and the meat retains its tenderness within the crispy, fried exterior. A must visit for jyu paa bao enthusiasts.They also have a Tsim Sha Tsui branch.

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45
T’ang Court
Restaurants

T’ang Court

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

Named after the golden age of Chinese history, the T’ang Dynasty, this three-Michelin star restaurant is furnished lavishly in extravagant burgundy and gold tones. The extensive menu includes exceptional signature dishes like stir-fried lobster with spring onions and shallots and golden-fried stuffed crab claw, and the more expensive bird’s nests and abalones.

46
Moyo
Restaurants, Korean

Moyo

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

This stylish little hub, located just across the road from PMQ, offers inventive Korean cuisine with an Italian accent. The chewy rice cakes are a must-order and are tossed with sauces such as carbonara and pesto, although there's also a more conventional K-style version made with gochujang. We'll also wax lyrical about the tender pieces of Korean fried chicken, as well as the small but deliciously satisfying sea urchin rice.

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Bakehouse 2
Restaurants

Bakehouse

icon-location-pin Wan Chai

Opened by former Four Seasons executive pastry chef, Grégoire Michaud, Bakehouse offers all sorts of oven-fresh treats, from naturally leavened sourdoughs to buttery, flakey croissants and other pastries. If it’s your carb cheat day, this is the best place to go wild.

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Kwan Kee Claypot Rice
Restaurants

Kwan Kee Claypot Rice

icon-location-pin Sai Ying Pun

Kwan Kee’s widespread popularity owes much to the charcoal-fired clay pot rice dishes, which arrive with a layer of crispy, just-slightly-burnt rice at the bottom. Although the queue is often long, the wait really pays off when you finally get to taste the rice.

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Bedu
Restaurants, Middle Eastern

Bedu

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

The team behind Brazilian-Japanese restaurant Uma Nota is set to launch a new Middle Eastern concept this month. The restaurant and bar is inspired by the nomadic Bedouin tribes of the Middle Eastern deserts, and features plenty of spice-centric sharing plates as well as cocktails and mocktails crafted from seasonal produce and botanicals.

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Lau Sum Kee
Restaurants, Chinese

Lau Sum Kee Noodle

icon-location-pin Sham Shui Po

There aren’t many eateries left in Hong Kong that still make their own noodles the traditional way from scratch, Lau Sum Kee is one of the few. Best known for its wonton soup noodles with dried shrimp roe, the noodles here are made daily and kneaded with a bamboo pole. Try the beef stomach noodles; together with the tableside pickled radish it’s a winning combo.

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51
Jalan
Restaurants, Malaysian

Jalan

icon-location-pin Soho

The team behind Uma Nota and Bedu are back with yet another exciting adventure for the taste buds. This new venture brings contemporary Malaysian food to Hong Kong, taking cues from Malaysian street stalls and coffee shops to offer a spicy selection of new and playful interpretations of local favourites to Soho!

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Sing Heung Yuen
Restaurants, Chinese

Sing Heung Yuen (勝香園)

icon-location-pin Sheung Wan

A foodie experience in Hong Kong isn’t complete without a visit to a dai pai dong. The open-air venue has survived so many changes to the Central dining scene but it’s still blissfully knocking up top comfort food like tomato with scrambled eggs and lemon honey on crunchy toast.

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53
Peking Garden
Restaurants

Peking Garden (Tsim Sha Tsui)

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

A long-time favourite with tourists and locals alike, Peking Garden at Tsim Sha Tsui has recently undergone a complete facelift in celebration of its 40th anniversary. Aside from the sleek new interiors, the restaurant has also revamped its menu to include more dishes inspired by Beijing’s imperial cuisine. Old favourites remain, of course, including the signature Peking duck and the elaborately presented beggar’s chicken, which is set aflame and then cracked open with a large golden hammer.

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Restaurants, Chinese

The best dim sum in Hong Kong

There’s no dearth of dim sum in Hong Kong. From humble siu mai, to fluffly char siu bao and soupy xiao long bao, we pick out the best dim sum restaurants in Hong Kong.

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Restaurants

The best steakhouses in Hong Kong

Whether you’ve got a hankering for a porterhouse, a sirloin or a ribeye, start salivating and get your steak knife and fork ready as we share our pick of the best steak in Hong Kong.

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