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Emily Lloyd-Tait

Emily Lloyd-Tait

Emily Lloyd-Tait is Time Out's former Australia National Food & Drink Editor.

Articles (124)

The best bars in Sydney

The best bars in Sydney

February 2023 update: It's the last month of summer, and our town is awash with great places to grab a drink and, for that, we will be forever grateful. It's hard to narrow it down, but we've done the hard drinking work – research – to serve you up this list of the very best bars in Sydney right now.  We’ve whittled this list down to focus on what really matters most to us in a bar – what it is, why we love it and whatever hot tips we think will make your visit even better. The bottom line, however, is still the same: if it's on this list, we think it's a winner – and we hope that you do, too. This list represents our picks for the best bars in Sydney right now, from fresh faces to tried-and-tested temples of great booze, ranked by our local editors. We’re looking for quality above all, with fun, flavour, atmosphere, creativity, and options at every price point. Cheers to you, Sydney.   After a watering hole that's a bit more casual? See our list of the best pubs in Sydney, here. After a meal? Check out our best restaurants here.

The best yum cha in Sydney

The best yum cha in Sydney

January 2023 update: It's a new lunar year and dining-out season is in full swing. If you want to celebrate the year of the Rabbit, we recommend booking in advance at the most popular spots right now. Is there a better way to start the day than a torrent of fluffy pork buns, sea-sweet prawn har gow, chewy siu mai, slippery cheong fun, silken tofu, hearty beef tendon, braised chicken feet, mango pancakes and custard tarts? Absolutely not. Here's our definitive list of the best spots in Sydney to relish this morning ritual. Bring your strongest hangovers, a whole bunch of mates and an appetite for destruction and gallons of tea.  Still hungry? These are the best restaurants in Sydney.

The best craft brewery bars in Sydney

The best craft brewery bars in Sydney

Craft brewing has grown up a lot since pioneering Young Henrys came along in 2012. Gone are the days when small-batch pale ales were shrouded in mystery and looked upon with suspicion; craft beers have made their way into the mainstream, and we are here for it. The Australian beer landscape is now truly world class, and while we’re pretty darn spoiled for choice when it comes to places to drink craft beer in this city, there’s something special about going straight to the source. Fresh is best, after all, and it doesn’t get any fresher than that. From Sydney’s south to the Northern Beaches, there’s always a brewery close at hand – so leave the car keys at home, set aside an afternoon and make tracks to these excellent establishments pouring the top brews in town.  Prefer the pub? Head to one of Sydney's best pubs instead. Yearning for water views? Check out the best waterfront bars in Sydney.

The best steaks in Sydney

The best steaks in Sydney

No longer is the benchmark of a good steak tenderness alone. These days, restaurants are more concerned about ensuring flavour is the forefront of this special treat. Flavour derived from dry-aging, exploration of lesser known cuts, and of course how and where the meat was raised. More than anything, these restaurants are highlighting the old-world ritual of a steak dinner, elevating the craft from a quick sizzle and a bucket of peppercorns, to a practice of respect for both the diner, and the beast. From the prime ribs to the ironwood-grilled and the extremely dry-aged, we've picked out the best red meat Sydney has to offer. Clear your schedule, sit back and get stuck in. Not in a meaty mood? Chow down at one of Sydney's best vegan restaurants.

The best kid-friendly pubs in Sydney

The best kid-friendly pubs in Sydney

Rock climbing, giant Scrabble, flying foxes – there are pubs in Sydney that have amazing facilities for children, because the days of your local watering hole being an exclusive, blokey hideout are long gone. Not only are there pubs embracing inclusivity and actively welcome families with kids, but they're broadening their appeal across the board with better food, and more diverse entertainment. These are our favourite local pubs that don’t shun parents for bringing their toddlers or their tweens. Need to burn off some steam? Check out the best playgrounds in Sydney here.    

The best pick up bars in Sydney

The best pick up bars in Sydney

In these days of app-based dating and fear of contracting or passing on the spicy cough, the idea of meeting someone in the real world can sound fanciful, but we swear, it does happen. There are certain spaces in the Sydney bar scene where everyone can let their hair down and a good vibe is always a great start to a conversation with a cute stranger. Of course there's an argument to be made that any bar has the potential to be a pick-up bar, but that's not very helpful, so we asked every single person we knew, and a few we didn't, for their favourite fishing spots in Sydney and this is what they told us. Readers please take note: just because the bar is on this list, do not mean that everyone there is looking for a "good time". Read the room, read the vibes, approach with respect and for everyone's sake, if it's not an enthusiastic "yes" then it's a hard no. Rejection sucks, but it's not the end of the world. Wish them well and move on. No one likes a creep. Just after a drink? Here are the best bars in Sydney.

A local's guide to Marrickville

A local's guide to Marrickville

Marrickville’s identity is a complex one. The formerly industrial swathe of land in the Cook’s River basin has become a desirable postcode for families, but there’s still a lot of manufacturing and business rubbing shoulders with those beautiful federation homes and terraces. The suburb has been heavily influenced by waves of Greek and Vietnamese residents, with a healthy dose of creative colour on top as the Inner West’s rainbow and arts communities steadily move out from the centre. It’s a proper melting pot that’s as much a destination for dining as it is for auto-repair and wholesale provisions. Jump to a section: EAT DRINK COFFEE THINGS TO DO SHOPPING What’s Marrickville known forThese days most people head to Marrickville for their exceptional Vietnamese food – some of the city’s best banh mi are found along Illawarra Rd. Henson Park oval is a destination for sports fans; bookish types head for the award-winning, architecturally designed library; and music lovers flock for live music at after-hours haunts like the Factory Theatre, and the Red Rattler. Why do the locals love it?Eliza Carr is a new resident and loves the area because it hasn't suffered from the city sprawl or had its local identity undermined by over-developement. "It feels like a close knit neighbourhood even though it's quite close to the city. It's also a great place for the noodle lovers. Flu season is no match for the plethora of phos available on Illawarra Rd. It's also a really pretty suburb - it

You must try these 45 cheap Sydney snacks for $15 or under

You must try these 45 cheap Sydney snacks for $15 or under

Sure, you can't get something good, fast and cheap when it comes to architecture or web design, but when it comes to tasty treats to cram into your face on the fly, Sydney delivers in every corner of the city. In fact, some of our best eating is of the hand-held variety, be it a pastry, something sandwiched between bread, crunchy fried parcels or a little sweetie to cap things off. If you're short on time or money but still want your food to spark joy, these are 45 of the most delicious snacks you can get for under $15. Want to support your favourite Sydney restaurants? Don't forget to vote in our Time Out Bar and Restaurant Revive Awards.  

Where to find dog-friendly pubs and bars in Sydney

Where to find dog-friendly pubs and bars in Sydney

Nothing says 'who's a good boy' quite like a lush beer garden and a big silver bowlful of water. So, to treat yourself and your pooch, we've compiled a list of the most dog-friendly pubs in Sydney. Bonus points: even if you don't own a hound, you're likely to run into a few of them at these joints. So if you're desperate for a bit of canine bonding, here's where to come to play with other people's pets.  Want more? Here's our guide to Sydney's best dog-friendly beaches.

The best pubs and bars with fireplaces in Sydney

The best pubs and bars with fireplaces in Sydney

Winter is when some of Sydney's best pubs really are the best place to be. Better yet when the mercury really drops, is a pub or bar with a great fire place. Curl up in front of the flames – preferably wood, but we'll take gas if that's what's on offer – with a pint of beer and lose whole evenings in the comfort of your local, staying warm and dry all winter long. Be prepared for any weather. These are the best things to do in Sydney when it rains.

The best desserts you can get delivered to your door

The best desserts you can get delivered to your door

Just because you (or someone you love) can't physically get themselves out to a luxe dessert location doesn't mean your, or their, sweet teeth should suffer. Whether you want a spectacular finish to your meal, to send someone a perfect artisan donut after a rough day on the books,  or – just simply want to eat your own feelings in front of the TV, these top-tier dessert slingers will deliver a sweet treat directly to your door.  Give your drinks cart a glow up with these sensational bottled cocktails from top Sydney bars. Doughnuts from Short Stop There’s a certain appeal of a classic strawberry iced doughnut that tastes like childhood, but at Short Stop they are slinging doughnuts designed for more adult palates. We’re talking the bittersweet flavour of bergamot in the Earl Grey icing or the sharpness of cardamom in the classic cinnamon sugar ring. Order up an adventurous selection and get them delivered to you via Deliveroo. A brownie slab from Baked by Blonde Butler Alex Cadger's boutique catering operation is now offering a particularly sweet way to say 'I love you' to a special someone in lockdown. And plot twist, that special someone can also be yourself. The fully customisable brownie slabs not only come decked out with all manner of lip-smacking extras – think chunks of Toblerone, whole Oreo cookies and succulent cherries – you can also include a message, spelled out in edible chocolate letters.  Lamingtons from Tokyo Lamington Stale shreds of desiccated coconut and

21 things that all Millennials miss in Sydney

21 things that all Millennials miss in Sydney

According to the latest census, published on June 28, Millennials are now rivaling Boomers as the largest generation in Australia. So, now that this demo is all grown up, it's worth taking a stroll down memory lane to remember all of the classic good times we used to love back in the day when we weren't quite as adult as we are now. Join us on this nostalgic look back at all the venues and experiences in Sydney that made our teens and twenties so damn good. In search of a fun time right now? Check out these top dancefloors in Sydney. Goodgod Small Club (2010-2015) It looked like a party bar from the Flintstones, the drinks were brightly coloured, there were hot dogs on the menu, and out the back, the band room hosted some of the most varied and exciting parties in Sydney. It’s where you’d go for some late night Dutty Dancing, a Beyoncé dance class, quality pop culture trivia and unforgettable live gigs. Photograph: Supplied Q Bar (1993-2015) The giant Exchange Hotel venue sprawled along Oxford Street, with Spectrum, Nevada, 34B, and Q Bar all providing a perch for every kind of night owl that existed. But it’s the raging nights at Q Bar we miss the most. The Monorail (1988-2013) Look, it might not have been the most practical form of transport, but we miss the quiet train looping above the city like a silver snake constantly chasing its own tail from Darling Harbour up to the CBD and back again. Purple Sneakers at the Abercrombie Hotel (2006-2010) The party that united indi

Listings and reviews (262)

Kittyhawk

Kittyhawk

5 out of 5 stars

After intermittent pandemic-led closures over the past few years, Kittyhawk is well and truly back, and celebrating its revival with revamped food, wine and cocktail menus. Jared Merlino of Lobo fame took over the corner of Bent and Phillip Streets in Sydney's financial district with this 1940s-themed French-American bar. It's a place with that olde-worlde luxury vibe that means you feel right at home in your tailored work wear.  Nowadays there's more focus on food. The head chef is from Paris, and hopes to revive both classic and more obscure French dishes by giving them a modern twist. The menu is fun, unpretentious and made for sharing. If you're after snacks, you can get oysters, cheeses, or shaved meats – along the lines of coppa and parma ham – served with pickles. For mains, there's a deliciously sticky slow-cooked beef brisket, or a lemon-crusted baked fish of the day, which both pair perfectly with the oak lettuce salad and frites. The design of the space is inspired by Liberation Day in Paris (August 25, 1944), and, more specifically, by the Rum and Rye Old Fashioneds, of which they have many, all of which infuse different varieties of each spirit, along with Angostura bitters, orange bitters, brown gomme syrup and a boxy ice cube. We let the bartenders choose our spirit mix and are presented with a cocktail that tastes of soft caramel with a whisper of orange. It’s boozy as hell but you’d hardly notice over the smooth, dried fruit flavours. There are also plenty of

Courthouse Hotel

Courthouse Hotel

5 out of 5 stars

There’s nothing about this old boozer that we don’t like and we are not alone in that sentiment. We suspect if anyone ever tried to refurbish the Courthouse Hotel there’d be rioting in the streets. This old pub is like a well-worn jumper – warm, comfortable, and big enough to fit anyone and everyone. And like any cherished piece of outerwear, it may be a little scuffed and faded, but that’s what happens when you love something with force. The beautiful thing about this old boozer is that it’s a pub designed to facilitate a good time on your terms. Want to sit up at the bar with a huge plate of fish and chips and watch back-to-back AFL games? This is the best place for it. Prefer to sink your tip money in pinball machines while you annihilate jugs of Stone and Wood Pacific Ale and Young Henrys Newtowner? Right this way. They’ve even got two separate outdoor areas so that smokers and diners can both enjoy the sunshine, and they let you bring your dog (on a lead) or kid (no lead required, probably). It’s the little details that count with a pub feed, like the perfectly layered nachos to ensure optimal crunch to cheese ratio, or foregoing a predictable chicken burger and making things interesting with a lamb, mint and yoghurt burger instead. Plus, there’s a whole lot more on the menu here for veggos than your average pumpkin salad – praise be for the edamame and eggplant salad. You know how the Courty got so awesome? Practice. They’ve been perfecting the art of the pub session fo

Hubert

Hubert

5 out of 5 stars

You’re sitting at the bar, drinking a gin Martini out of a Nick and Nora glass, and ‘As Time Goes By’ is being played by a jazz quintet set against a red velvet curtain. This isn’t an elaborate Casablanca fantasy but rather the very real experience of dining at Restaurant Hubert on a Wednesday or Thursday night. That’s when they have the live band, which is essential to maintaining the illusion that you have travelled back in time, helped by the fact that two stories underground your phone won’t get reception worth a damn. Dinner here is akin to immersive theatre: the narrative is a love story and the leads are played by a perfect steak bavette and your fine self. It catches your eye on the menu, it joins you at the table, and after that first bite you fall deeply in love. The Rangers Valley flank has a char that is textbook, it’s served bloody and melting over the top is a Café de Paris butter that features no less than 19 ingredients. It has a complexity worthy of a Millenium Prize Problem. Out of the kitchen comes work from the classic French bistro handbook, punking up a velvety soft Wagyu tartare with anchovy, and directing sweet, juicy baby beetroots to go full melodrama in a purple pool of sharp blackberry vinaigrette, wearing a fascinator of flamboyant curls of crinkled Téte de Moine, a sour and creamy Swiss cheese. Don’t be fooled by the diminutive title, because le petit aioli is no tiny snack – it’s a weighty grazing plate starring celeriac wedges, fresh avocado,

The Gidley

The Gidley

4 out of 5 stars

One minute you’re standing outside an unmarked charcoal-grey door in the CBD with King Street traffic rushing behind you, next minute you’re buzzed into the kind of stately home you’d expect to find in the Southern Highlands, or hunting country in the UK. At the Gidley, the second steak restaurant from the Liquor and Larder group who also own Bistecca, Grandma’s and the Wild Rover, a friendly host takes your jacket, walks you past the galley bar and into a velvet-lined booth, complete with curtains. Once your table is ready you head around into the dining room – a soft, elegant space, masculine without being macho. Sure, there’s a whole lot of dark timber, muted tones and a ceiling blanketed in black, noise-absorbing material, but there’s also the ‘grandmother banquette’ upholstered in a chintzy floral fabric that lines one side of the room. Comfort is their watchword.  Picture a kind of later years Downton Abbey/Poirot does lunch setting and you’ll be bang on the money. The sense that you’re in a clubhouse is ably assisted by a menu of aristocratic comforts like oysters, caviar, crab cakes, terrine, a whole flounder, potato gratin and a Waldorf salad to go with your steak. But it’s the little flourishes that take dishes from their time warp and firmly into the realm of modern tastes, like prawn heads dusted in Old Bay, fried until crunchy, and wrapped up tight in a lettuce leaf, a bit like a Korean ssambap. It’s possible to spend a truly eye-watering sum of money on steak i

Rozelle Collectors Market

Rozelle Collectors Market

A new wardrobe doesn’t have to mean popping tags on hundreds of dollars worth of swag, especially when you’re shopping at this long-standing secondhand market in Rozelle. The schoolyard of the Rozelle Public School has been a hive of weekend crate digging for more than 20 years, and while some stalls have almost earned long service leave, there are always newcomers keen to swap their good and chattel for some cold hard cash.The market runs on Saturdays from 9am to 3pm, and you can find bargains for less than you’d spend on a coffee – it’s all about the chase. Don’t be afraid to dig down into the tables of tops and skirts, T-shirt piles and racks of leather jackets. And if you don’t need vintage boots, a floral dress or a designer bargain, stroll through stalls selling antiques, cut glass crystal, old suitcases, DVDs, furniture and bric-a-brac. When you’re completely overstimulated head to the top right corner of the market where a handful of food stalls sell Himalayan fare, fresh juices squeezed on demand, gozleme, and dim sum. Because it’s a school there are no soft drinks sold on site, but a watermelon and rockmelon juice should sort out any dusty heads, and if nothing in the second-hand market grabs your attention, you can always grab a plant from the garden stall on your way out.   Want to know about markets in other parts of Sydney? Here's our guide.

Carriageworks Farmers Market

Carriageworks Farmers Market

It’s imperative that you do not eat before you visit the Carriageworks Farmers Markets. You’ll want to save maximum belly space for your personal version of The Bachelorette where you decide who gets your dollars and what delicious produce gets to come home with you. Maybe you like something soupy and savoury first thing? In that case go for the pho stand for a traditional Vietnamese start to the day. There’s a bibimbap stall that will even replace the rice with shredded cauliflower if you don’t believe in cheat days, and a classic bacon and egg roll for creatures of habit, from Farmer Rod’s Free Range stall. Once the hounds of your hunger have been quieted it’s time to prepare for your next meal, or seven. Maybe you need the sweet bite of Pickle Hill’s Worcester sauce for the pantry? Or some fresh goat’s curd from Willowbrae? While you’re there you may as well get some smoked salmon, fresh ravioli from Pasta Emilia, free range eggs, a load of beer and barley bread form the Bread and Butter Project, and some jersey milk butter to go on it. You can spend a whole lot of money if you want to here, but equally you could just grab a kombucha on tap and find a chair for some of the best dog-watching in the city. Hungry for more? Look at our list of the best markets in Sydney – produce or otherwise.   

Willowbrae Cheese

Willowbrae Cheese

Since ‘the great indoors’, our appreciation of simple pleasures appears to have gained sharp new focus. But if you also quite like the idea of someone else taking care of the DIY cottagecore for a while, pull up a stool at the counter of Rozelle’s new cheese cellar door, Willowbrae. Avid market-goers will recognise the tubs of fresh goat’s curd rolled in crushed black olives, mixed pepper or beetroot relish as mainstays of the Orange Grove Organic Food Markets, Northside Produce Markets, Carriageworks, Le Marche and Hawkesbury Harvest Markets. But now Willowbrae’s chevre can be enjoyed all week long, and in all weather conditions, at their very own urban outpost on Rozelle's Darling Street. Willowbrae’s new owner, Daniel Thaine, is a hobby person. He brews his own beer, throws his own pottery, stuffs his own sausages, makes sake from scratch, and in late 2020 was dabbling in some small scale cheese-making with milk he bought off goat farmers Karen and David Borg at the Orange Grove markets. A fortuitous conversation revealed the couple were getting out of the goat business, and so in early 2021 Thaine took the reins of the cheese-making arm of Willowbrae Cheese, setting up a full production kitchen in a former ice cream shop a few streets from where he lives. Thaine is eschewing the classic takeaway café model in favour of encouraging people to sit down and take their time at the cheese bar. His homemade ethos goes right to the heart of the operation, which includes hand thro

Tanja Lagoon Camp

Tanja Lagoon Camp

If you’re a deeply entrenched city slicker then there is no softer landing into a camping experience than a stay at Tanja Lagoon Camp. If you're accustomed to roughing it a little, prepare to experience camping luxury – all the good bits with no inconvenience. They’ve set up four expansive safari tents on permanent timber platforms ringing the lagoon in a manner that guarantees absolute privacy. This is especially good news given there is a full-sized bathtub next to the window for soaking with a view. There’s a kitchen equipped with everything you need to prepare a meal, including a gratifyingly sharp knife. Of course, if it’s not camping without that woodfire flavour there are individual fire pits for each tent and camp chairs so you can sit around the glowing coals. Sink into the big soft bed – give thanks it’s not a camping mat – and let birds and wallabies soundtrack your evening and early rise, which is the best time to get out on the lagoon for a kayak from the jetty. Missed the morning calm? The wind dies down again in the evening before sunset, and if you make it over to Middle Beach you’ll feel like the last person on earth, which is no small ask considering you’re only five-and-a-half hour’s drive from Sydney.  Brekky is coffee, tea, bread, butter, honey and eggs from the family’s chooks, supplemented with some fresh vegetables from the impressive kitchen garden that you can pick yourself. From Tanja it’s an easy drive to Tathra for lunch on the last remaining deep

Gelato Blue

Gelato Blue

The great thing about gelato is that if you prefer fruit flavours to creamy ones you’re already choosing the vegan option – your lemon, passion fruit, mango and strawberry-raspberry options at this Newtown gelateria taste just like they would at any other ice cream shop. It’s in the chocolate/caramel/vanilla family of flavours that Gelato Blue are doing things differently. They are a fully plant-based gelateria so instead of cream they use coconut milk to achieve a pretty similar result. Happily the very subtle coconut flavour you get in the ice creams here complements, rather than clashes with, the sweet caramel flavours in the dulce de leche gelato, which is a little more icy than a dairy edition but just as refreshing on a sweltering day. Check out Time Out's guide to the best vegan restaurants in Sydney.

Porcine

Porcine

Opportunity doesn’t necessarily knock. Sometimes it pours you a glass of wine and says, “we’ve got a space upstairs you should see”. This is how Porcine, the beautiful, French garret restaurant on Oxford Street came to be, perched on the first floor above the aqua blue façade of natural wine shop, P&V Wine and Liquor.  Together the two businesses cover excess in all its most delicious forms: downstairs is where you stock the home bar with everything funky, fresh and smashable that comes with an age restriction, plus a local larder of snacks and condiments. Like to try before you buy? They operate a mini wine bar out in the back courtyard. But upstairs is where your cheat day has died and gone to heaven, via the giant pat of house-churned butter and fresh bread sitting at the top of the stairs. On our visit the menu is in deep cool weather territory and the dish that we will never stop thinking about arrives early in proceedings. We didn’t know we needed foie gras wrapped in a gingerbread in our life, but it was worth every painstaking minute of the month that Nik Hill spent recipe testing to work out the perfect balance of chicken liver and butter made into a parfait. The gingerbread dough needed to be baked at low temps to protect the rich heart of the dish, and a spoon of prunes soaked in Earl Grey tea and sherry vinegar is the sweet, sharp foil to a heartstopper of an entree. They keep those famously creamy French hits coming in the form of a potato gratin combined with a

Valentinas

Valentinas

So many things about Valentinas Sydney are surprising. Like its location, on a suburban stretch of Livingstone Road connecting the high streets of Petersham and Marrickville. You do not expect to find such a perfectly realised vision of mythological American dining in amongst the Federation homes and wide concrete driveways. It’s also surprising that so many people want to get their hands on the crumbly, short, cathead biscuits with a heart-attack’s worth of whipped maple butter and blueberry jam that even at 11am on a weekday there’s not a spare chair to be had and people milling on the footpath. Thanks to the great work-from-home revolution, the banquettes and counter seats are filled with an accurate cross-section of the Inner West’s professional league of creators, producers, facilitators, administrators and carers at all times.  And what is fuelling this hive of industry? On one table it’s a bronzed hunk of fried chicken sandwiched between a golden biscuit, at sea in a wash of gravy with home fries on the side. On our other side it’s the crunchy and near see-through house-made potato crisps that are given pride of place next to a breakfast sandwich packed with a juicy, rustic sausage patty, melted cheese and a fried egg served on an English muffin.  There’s nothing on the menu here that Elvis himself wouldn’t consider a rounded start to the day, which is also to say that there is nothing here for Buddha bowl enthusiasts. The closest you’ll get to green is the wedge of se

Nobu

Nobu

If we pocketed a dollar for every person who says Sydney is expensive, we’d be drinking on our very own, private, harbourfront deck. But you don’t need to be paying land tax to dress up and drink fancy by the water, you just need a booking at Nobu, the antipodean offshoot of the globally famous restaurant chain owned by chef Nobu Matsuhisa and Robert De Niro.  Nobu has become part of the zeitgeist. If you know, you know, that black cod miso is one of the restaurant’s most enduring and famous dishes, and happily for those who want the full New York experience without the jet lag, that punchy, earthy fillet of fish features on the Sydney menu too.  To ensure that there’s consistency across the venues they’ve installed chef Harold Hurtada at the helm of Nobu Sydney, who is a veteran of the restaurant group, serving at Nobu Cape Town and Dubai. But for local flavour, they’ve bolstered the team with local recruitment, snagging a sushi chef from Sokyo for the opening line-up. Hurtada is the man tasked with ensuring that the original blueprint of Nobu’s offering translates to its latest location, and he describes Australia’s produce offering as “heaven” with its abundant seafood and export quality meat. Turns out VIP access to a chef isn’t a corner booth and a red velvet rope, it’s full blood wagyu from NSW that is raised exclusively for your restaurant.  Now, before you start checking what a healthy left kidney fetches on the black market, let us tell you about the ultimate afforda

News (246)

Book a vintage caravan kitted out with a gin cocktail trolley

Book a vintage caravan kitted out with a gin cocktail trolley

If idea of a NSW road trip is bringing back nostaglia-tinted memories of an '80s holiday in a caravan by the sea, perhaps it's time to relive your childhood with a vintage caravan. Camplify is kind of like Airbnb but for campervans, caravans and trailers. It allows the people who have invested in all the road-life kit to share their gear instead of it just being parked in the driveway when they're at home. One of the vans on the Camplify site is called Mazzy, and she's a navy and white vintage van that's been renovated and restored with mod retro stylings. There's a queen-sized bed with proper linen, bunks and games for kids, big windows so you don't feel cramped, and a timber-topped galley kitchen with espresso machine and fancy loose leaf teas. The van also comes with beach towels, umbrellas, deck chairs, a barbecue and a chilly bin. But the big selling point is that for the whole of summer is that you get a complete cocktail cart thrown in, kitted out with a full bottle of Botanist gin, cocktail shakers, glassware, mixers (Fever Tree tonic and Sunday Lab herbal tea) and garnishes so you can live that luxe life on a $140-a-night budget.   The van itself is based in Flinders, NSW, which is on the South Coast, and can be towed up to 100kms, which means you can inland past Berrima, up as far as central Sydney, and down further south about as far as Bendalong Beach. All you need to do is find a caravan-friendly spot and the holiday accom comes to you. Prefer to pitch a tent? T

12 ways to not be a dick when it rains in Melbourne

12 ways to not be a dick when it rains in Melbourne

Melbourne’s known for its crazy, unpredictable weather. But it seems whenever we’re hit with a major storm, Melburnians etiquette goes right out the window. It needs to stop. Here are some etiquette rules to follow when it rains in Melbourne. 1. Don’t shake your umbrella at people Get the excess water off by all means, but don’t spray someone in the face like you’re a dirty dog on bath day, and be careful where your umbrella is dripping. It could be on the ground, or it could be on someone else’s shoes. 2. Do not steal from the umbrella bucket This is an honour system. No one likes a drippy, slippery floor so we all agree to leave our rain barriers at the door and only leave with the crappy folding black one we arrived with, not that fetching one with the Museum of Modern Art masterpiece on it. 3. You either have to go high or low with your umbrella All umbrellas can’t stay at head height on footpaths – they won’t fit. Someone needs to go high in a crowd, and someone needs to go low, and you should pick a height early so everyone can adapt smoothly around you. Also, the tallest person in a sharing situation holds the umbrella, them's the rules. 4. Don’t hog the awnings If you have a brolly, walk on the rainy side and leave the awning protection for less well-prepared people. In particular, do not force anyone to walk along the drip zone – those chubby droplets right down your collar are unpleasant. 5. Move with purpose on public transport People want to get off fast but also

7 places to get a top of the line lamington in Sydney

7 places to get a top of the line lamington in Sydney

There is schoolyard joy in a packet of supermarket sponge cake fingers dipped in chocolate and covered in desiccated coconut like wet feet in sand. But Sydney’s pastry standards are very high, so when you want your sweet treat to feel special, these are the patissiers going the extra mile when it comes to the humble lamington. Buy a box, put the kettle on and bask in some vintage Australiana snacking this summer. Flour and StoneNadine Ingram’s lamingtons are famous. If you think that sponge cake is dry, you are about to eat your words along with this famous cake. The secret is that they dip the cake in panna cotta mix before rolling it in a thick layer of chocolate and a snowfall of coconut shards that are still tropical and chewy. In fact, the lamington is so popular you can get it year-round, and even order it in novelty sizes for birthday and wedding cakes.  Tokyo LamingtonThe newcomer to the Sydney scene is making a buzz with their elaborate flavoured cakes. Given the time of year, they have a menu leaning hard on Australian native flavours, like macadamia and honey, Davidson plum and chocolate, chai and pepperberry or lemon myrtle lime bitters. Plus, they deliver, so you can order a box for your public holiday shindig. Textbook PatisserieIn honour of this afternoon tea favourite, pastry chef and Textbook Patisserie owner John Ralley has dedicated his weekend croissant special to the lamington. Order by Friday Jan 22 for the jumbo version, or you can buy a regular sized s

Eat a Frozen-themed high tea from dessert maestros, Koi

Eat a Frozen-themed high tea from dessert maestros, Koi

Gut instinct tells us there is cross over between people who love Disney and those who love dessert, and the center of that particular Venn diagram has just been gifted a Frozen-themed high tea. These are not just your run of the mill scones and mini tarts, the cake tower is being filled by Koi, famous for their beautiful pastries with elaborate flavour combinations and glossy, perfect finishes. The multi-tiered cake-fest is themed to the the song 'In Summer', sung by the naive, weather optimist and anthropomorphised snowman, Olaf. As a result the cake line-up features a layered dessert of passionfruit, coconut and pineapple; the cherry jazz, made with fresh cherry, raspberry, jasmine, blood orange, and almond; a chocolate raspberry cake; a confection shaped like a piece of precious jade; a salted caramel macaron and a chamomile and honey scone. There are savouries too, including a tomato cream pastry with lump fish roe, a tiny chicken and leek pie, and tomato and fetta toast, plus free-flowing tea or coffee. The high tea costs $70 per person and runs on weekends from Saturday January 9 to Sunday January 31 at Koi Ryde and Koi Chippendale. Bookings are essential. Need more finger sandwiches and scones in your life? Here are more of Sydney's best high teas.

Dan Pepperell is behind the new pizza menu at Frankie's Pizza by the Slice

Dan Pepperell is behind the new pizza menu at Frankie's Pizza by the Slice

It's no NYC, but Sydney has a vocal, devoted pizza fanbase, and they possess very strong feelings on where to get a top pie in the city. Those with a vested interest in good pizza in Sydney should put the CBD's late-night, rock'n'roll, party pizza parlour back on top of their hit list because Frankie's Pizza by the Slice has a new and improved pizza menu, care of one of the city's most celebrated chefs. The wait times for a table at Hubert are as famous as the underground French bistro's chicken fricassee, but former Hubert head chef Dan Pepperell has put in a rockstar appearance, reworking the Frankie's menu after a research trip to New York early in 2020. The new bases at Frankie's are now made using stoneground flour and the dough is left to ferment for a full three days before being stretched out, placed on a pizza stone and cooked slowly until the crust is crisp and blistered. On top, your options now include a rosemary pizza, bolstered with two kinds of cheese (fior di latte and scamorza); a pepperoni pie that balances the spicy heat with a hint of honey; a classic Marg; a herby, zippy combo of zucchini, lemon, chilli, garlic and mint; or the Texas, which involves fior di latte, ricotta, roasted corn, red onion, pickled jalapeño, garlic, chilli powder, coriander, and lime. Yee hah!If it's been a while between music trivia nights or heavy metal gigs, a whole new pizza menu with fine dining credentials is as good a reason to carb-load in the new year as any. Prefer Italia

Buy a meal for a DV survivor for an extra $7.50 when you dine at Chiswick

Buy a meal for a DV survivor for an extra $7.50 when you dine at Chiswick

We are huge fans of the work of Two Good Co. at Time Out. Their lunch jars initiative allowed people to buy a healthy soup or salad designed by leading Australian chefs, and in return they would donate one to a domestic violence survivor in a women's shelter. The program extended to gifts like designer leisurewear, blankets, and beauty  products.  Now they're doubling down on the spirit of the giving season by partnering with Chiswick Woollahra. When you dine at the beautiful garden restaurant until Christmas Day you will be offered the option to purchase an 'empty plate' for $7.50. If you add it to your bill they will ensure a meal is donated to a woman in need. You buy one, they give one, and a little bit of goodness is spread in these trying times.So far, Two Good has delivered more than 157,000 meals to refuges and shelters since business began in late 2016. They also invest in future building by training and employing women in the hospitality industry. Got time to give? Here are some places you can volunteer in Sydney.  

Sydney’s most iconic dish has been announced, and the clue is in the name

Sydney’s most iconic dish has been announced, and the clue is in the name

There’s a strong argument to be made for salt and pepper squid being Australia’s national dish, what with its compelling combination of fresh seafood, Asian culinary influences and being widely available, be it at your local fish and chipper or a higher-end dining room. But no, we asked 38,000 people globally what they thought their city’s most defining dish was and the answer for Sydney was Sydney rock oysters (see, the clue was in the name). The dish is not just synonymous with Sydney, but eponymous too. Those famously creamy bivalves grown along the east coast are the opening act on pretty much any menu in the city, regardless of cuisine or status. In fact, they’re so endemic to Sydney dining that some places go so far as to have devoted oyster happy hours where you can double your shellfish for half the normal ticket price. In Melbourne, their answer was Italian-American import the parma, a pub staple made from crisp chicken schnitty coated in a layer of Napoli sauce, slices of smoky ham, and topped with a horde of melted cheese. If you’re in Austin, Texas the resounding answer to ‘what should I eat first’ was breakfast tacos; in Copenhagen it was smørrebrød; and in Kuala Lumpur is was nasi lemak. Given the state of our travel industry there’s not a lot of international sojourns in our immediate future, but happily for Sydneysiders, many of these dishes are available here. Why not engage in some dining chair travel and see how many of the 46 dishes you can knock off the l

A new anthology of diverse Australian food writing comes out this month

A new anthology of diverse Australian food writing comes out this month

They say if you want to get something done give it to a busy person, and Lee Tran Lam is very, very busy. If you have engaged with Sydney’s lifestyle media in any way over the last decade and a half you’ll have come across her byline, whether it’s on her long-serving food blog, her community radio show, or her freelance journalism for Good Food, Gourmet Traveller, SBS Food and Time Out.  Now Lam has added activist to her crowded CV. She’s the editor of a new collection of food writings designed to address the lack of diversity in food media. It stemmed from an Instagram account she started called Diversity in Food Media where she began profiling writers, chefs, photographers and other content makers from diverse backgrounds. Photograph: Supplied New Voices on Food is being published by new era custom publishing house, Somekind. They have developed a new publishing model, similar to crowdfunding. It’s a sustainable model that means everyone who works on the books works to profit share, so the books require no initial financial investment and if enough people pre-order they know they have an audience and the book gets made. So far Lankan Filling Station, PnV Liquor Merchants, Woy Woy Fisherman’s Wharf and Boon Luck Farm have all set their tales to print. “As a freelancer I don’t have heaps of power, but as an editor you have more power to change that [lack of diversity]. Media outlets also don’t have the budget right now so there wasn’t a chance for new voices to join the co

ACME's Mitch Orr is cooking casual Italian at Freshwater Beach

ACME's Mitch Orr is cooking casual Italian at Freshwater Beach

Since closing his Potts Point restaurant, ACME, in mid 2019, Mitch Orr has been keeping busy, heading up the kitchen at Bondi's CicciaBella and also sharing his knowledge with a series of lock-down friendly Instagram tutorials that walked you through his renegade approach to pasta. Now he is cooking by the sea once again, but this time in the city's north, where he has taken over the nighttime offering at Barretto, the casual small bar underneath Pilu at Freshwater. Baretto Nights are a weekend affair, running from 4.30-9pm Fridays through Sundays,so you can towel off, get dressed and mosey over for a plate of salami with pickled chilli, hash brown bites with tallegio cheese, fried calamari or a springtime riff on bruschetta with peas and edamame. Like the dining room upstairs, here the wine list is a an all-Italian, mostly Sardinian, by-the-glass party. Or you can cool off with cocktails or imported beers. It might be Giovanni Pilu's venue, but this is Mitch Orr's food so you can expect a few surprising Asian elements sneaking their ay into the classic wine bar fare, like a stracciatella and corn spiked with furikake, Japan's ultra-savoury seaweed and sesame seasoning. Yellowfin tuna might get all dressed up with a bonito mayo; and Sardinia's gnocchi/pasta hybrid, malloreddus, comes sauced with spanner crab and tomato butter. For dessert, grapefruit granita, potato ice cream and Itaian meringue. The menu changes regularly but you can rest assured it'll have Orr's famous riff

All-you-can-eat pizza is back at Maybe Frank

All-you-can-eat pizza is back at Maybe Frank

Sydney has always been a town that knows how to have a good time in big doses, from our massive festival seasons all the way down to the weekly bottomless brunches on offer around town. Now you can stretch your mid-week indulgences to their maximum capacity with the return of Maybe Frank's all-you-can-eat pizza night on Wednesdays. For $20 – a mere lobster – plus a drink, you can eat wood-fired pizza until you feel more like Mr Creosote than the Slender Man. The offer is valid at both the Surry Hills and Randwick venues. Much like The Very Hungry Caterpillar, you might need to eat a nice green leaf or too to restore your equilibrium, which is why the deal includes a mixed salad, and a Nutella slider. Plus, this isn't one of those situations where you get what you get and you don't get upset –  there’s eleven pizzas to choose from so you can double down on a classic Margherita, or use the power of a group booking to sample the lot. Need to get away? Try one of these cosy cabins and tiny houses near Sydney.   // (function(t,e,s,n){var o,a,c;t.SMCX=t.SMCX||[],e.getElementById(n)||(o=e.getElementsByTagName(s),a=o[o.length-1],c=e.createElement(s),c.type="text/javascript",c.async=!0,c.id=n,c.src="https://widget.surveymonkey.com/collect/website/js/tRaiETqnLgj758hTBazgd62Bmw17OPjwaMCidKjBap_2BXGRqnyl37h22yEbt7JS6_2B.js",a.parentNode.insertBefore(c,a))})(window,document,"script","smcx-sdk"); //  

13 etiquette rules to follow for when it rains in Sydney

13 etiquette rules to follow for when it rains in Sydney

We enjoy ludicrously good weather in Sydney about 85 per cent of the time, but for those scant rainy weeks each year we become damp and grizzly and as devoid of manners as we are proper wet weather footwear.1. Accept that your food delivery will be lateYou know what every single other office worker is thinking when it starts bucketing down at 11am? “How do I get my lunch without getting wet?”. If you genuinely can’t face the weather, remember that delivery services are getting slammed with orders from people just like you, and so you can either get your own food, or accept that it’ll be an hour later than you hope. Those are your options, and there’s no point getting snarky with the person who did brave the downpour to bring you ramen/pizza/Thai food.2. Do not steal from the umbrella bucketThis is an honour system. No one likes a drippy, slippery floor so we all agree to leave our rain barriers at the door and only leave with the crappy folding black one we arrived with, not that fetching one with the Museum of Modern Art masterpiece on it.3. You either have to go high or low with your umbrellaAll umbrellas can’t stay at head height on footpaths – they won’t fit. Someone needs to go high in a crowd, and someone needs to go low, and you should pick a height early so everyone can adapt smoothly around you. Also, the tallest person in a sharing situation holds the umbrella, them's the rules.4. Don’t hog the awningsIf you have a brolly, walk on the rainy side and leave the awning

Should you buy the $26 sandwich everyone is talking about?

Should you buy the $26 sandwich everyone is talking about?

Everyone's favourite thing to complain about in Sydney is pricing, and it's not just bemoaning the RRP on a two-bedroom apartment. It doesn't take much to get people lamenting the cost of fancy dumplings, extra guacamole and parking fines (fair cop on that last one). So you can imagine what certain quarters of the internet had to say about the $26 French dip sandwich at Continental Deli, Bar Bistro CBD. Yes, it's a $26 sandwich, and yes, comments about brown-bagging a sanga from home and saving the remainder abounded. But not all sandwiches are made equal, and there are a few very good reasons why you should consider dropping your hard earned on this tasty baguette. 1. It's straight-up delicious. This should always be the most compelling reason to spend good money on great food. 2. There's no filler. This is a sandwich constructed from the best bits in every category. The layers of roast beef strike the perfect balance between that rare, pink blush and edges of caramelised fat. The meat is uniformly tender and flavoursome and over the top they've melted just enough cheese to bind everything together. Even at this point it's juicy enough, but the bowl of pan juices for your to dip each bite into is what makes this unlike any other sandwich in town. 3. You can share it. It's undeniably rich and filling, so why not consider splitting one if you don't mind sharing the broth bowl? That leaves room for a cheese and charcuterie plate, or just more wine. 4. Location matters. Yes, you

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