Hong Kong’s best hotpot restaurants

We scour the city for the best and most unique hotpot venues in Hong Kong
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Whenever the temperature drops and the weather gets chilly in our city, a good hotpot is the go-to-method to warm up. But unlike claypot rice and snake soup, which tend to be seasonal delights, Hongkongers crave hotpot all year round. To keep up with demand and to keep things interesting, many restaurants have added twists to the traditional chicken broth and vegetable hotpots and now offer a range of innovative soups and flavours. From Taiwanese stinky tofu to Italian-style ‘da bin lo’, follow our guide to the best and most unique hotpot spots in town. 

Hong Kong’s best hotpot

Restaurants, Hot pot

Sichuan-style: Chongqing Liuyishou Hot Pot

icon-location-pin Causeway Bay

Chongqing hotpot has increasingly lit up the scene – and people’s tongues – over the past few years. New kid on the block Liuyishou is one of the top hotpot chains in Chongqing. It finally came to Hong Kong last month and its been winning diners over with its traditional Chinese décor and signature Sichuan spicy broth, which guarantees an intense flavour and mouth-numbing sensation.

Aside from the traditional spicy option, there’s a range of house specials – and less searing – options including Seafood Deluxe with Lobster, Thai Coconut Chicken, and Vegetarian Mushrooms. Offal, handmade dumplings and meatballs are also a must-try when you’re ordering ingredients. Prices start from $168.

Restaurants

Japanese-style: Nabe Urawa

icon-location-pin Causeway Bay

Nabe Urawa is the go-to-place for insatiable Shabu Shabu fans. Anyone feeling their skin is in need of more bounce, order up the Genki broth. A supposedly collagen-boosting concoction, the chicken and pork bones used are softly simmered for up to eight hours, then delicately strained and frozen until ready to be served. If you require more variety, there are other creative broth options including sukiyaki topped with melted cotton candy, Boston lobster, and spicy seaweed. There’s also a wealth of other ingredients to dunk in your pot, plus freshly-made sushi, drinks and desserts. Price are decent given it’s a 90-minutes all-you-can-eat deal, but vary depending on the grade of your ingredients. Starts from $178 for 90-minutes.

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Restaurants, Chinese

Beijing-style: Dong Lai Shun

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui East

Founded in Beijing in 1903, Dong Lai Shun is best known for using thinly sliced mutton from Mongolia in its hotpots. Pro tip: to keep the meat juicy and tender, skim a thin slice across the top of the bubbling hot pot for a few seconds, then dip it in the toothsome secret sauce. Prices start from $400.

Restaurants, Korean

Korean-style: The Joomak

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

Struggling to keep up with the latest K-pop trends? Then settle for K-pot instead. The Joomak is throwing its healthy, creative recipes into the battle for hotpot supremacy. Most notable is its pink-coloured carbonara soup. The broth is delicately tinged with prickly pears and a touch of creamy soymilk from Hong Kong’s very own Kung Wo Soy Bean Factory. Widely used as a healing herb in Korea, prickly pears are ideal for detoxifying, nourishing and removing accumulated heat within the body. Another option worth trying is the ginseng chicken soup made with free-range chickens from Spain. Stuffed with sticky rice, the chicken is slow-cooked with ginseng, goji berries and yam for five hours until the broth is bursting with wonderful herbal flavours. Prices start from $158.

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Restaurants, Swiss

Swiss-style: Chesa

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

With a proud history of more than 50 years, Chesa offers Hongkongers an authentic Swiss-dining experience in the setting of a cosy, romantic wooden chalet. People travel far and wide for the restaurant’s signature cheese fondue, which uses ingredients entirely imported from Switzerland. You can pick between the classic fondue, served with crusty bread, or the bacon and cheese fondue with macaroni and potatoes. Infused with a hint of sherry, make sure you dip your bread cubes in the cheesy goodness. Prices start from $280.

Restaurants, Italian

Italian-style: Linguini Fini

icon-location-pin Central

Apparently, Italian hotpot is now a thing. Known for its farm-to-table dining (and sizeable pizzas), Linguini Fini now offers Italian hotpot with signature broths like its Arthur Avenue Clam Broth, Funghi Trifolati and Mama Leslie’s Sunday Gravy. Fill up on classic Italian sausages, pasta, seafood and veggies, and go nuts on sauces such as parsley, anchovy, pesto and dried chili flakes. Advanced notice required. Prices start from $429.

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Restaurants, Thai

Thai-style: Thai Bin Lo

icon-location-pin Mong Kok

Don’t let Thai Bin Lo’s cheap and cheerful all-you-can-eat deals fool you. The ingredients are some quality stuff. Its authentic Thai-style soup base comes in four flavours including the signature tom yum and coconut chicken. The standard selection is a bit limited, so we suggest spending a few more bucks for the hand-cut beef shoulder and the seafood boat, which comes with fresh oysters, abalone, clams, prawns and more. At the buffet, you can also find a dozen cooked dishes like pork neck and lamb curry. Best of all, Thai Bin Lo does ‘soup pairings’ with a range of mocktails. Who’d have thought? Prices start from $178 for two hours.

Restaurants, Taiwanese

Taiwanese-style: 8Pots

icon-location-pin Tsim Sha Tsui

This popular chain restaurant originally started out in New Taipei City in 2005, before making its way to Hong Kong in 2016, bringing with it its delightful and pungent stinky tofu aroma. Massively popular, the signature stinky tofu hotpot comes with 15 different ingredients including stinky tofu straight from Taiwan, pork slices, pig’s blood cake and fried bean curd. The star attraction doesn’t disappoint: the tofu is crispy on the outside and super soft within, though the smell can’t quite compete with local varieties. If you hate the stink – which we should warn you is fairly inescapeable – there are other options you can select, such as garlic and beef, herbal lamb, milk and cheese, and tomato and pork. You can get any hotpot for $108 and they all come with a Taiwanese drink.

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Restaurants, Hot pot

Hong Kong-style: Market Hotpot

icon-location-pin Mong Kok

This Mong Kok restaurant is a favourite among locals. The interior decoration is a mashup of wet market, seafood market and a meat stall. That reflects perfectly how fresh all the ingredients are as the chef personally handpicks all the seafood and meat daily. There are more than 10 soup bases to pick from but the chicken and fish maw soup, and peppered pig’s stomach and chicken soup are among the best. We suggest you start and savour a bowl of the heartwarming soup before chucking in all your ingredients. Prices start from $238.

Looking for more winter warmers?

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