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Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade 2015
Photograph: Filip Wolak

The best things to do in NYC this weekend

The best things to do in NYC this weekend include the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, holiday lights, and more

Shaye Weaver
Edited by
Shaye Weaver
Contributor
Time Out New York contributors
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Looking for the best things to do in NYC this weekend? Whether you're the group planner searching for more things to do in NYC today, or you have no plans yet, here are some ideas to add to your list for this Thanksgiving weekend. Celebrate family and friends on Thanksgiving, see the beautiful holiday lights at the Bronx Zoo, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and New York Botanical Garden—all of which open this weekend—and more. There's much to do—all you have to do is scroll down to plan your weekend!

And don't forget to bring your proof of vaccination with you. Most indoor settings require it.

RECOMMENDED: Full list of the best things to do in NYC

Things to do in NYC this weekend

  • Things to do
Before America gets turnt on turkey and settles in to watch some football, all eyes turn to Manhattan during the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. This November, after a year where celebrations looked very different, things are getting back to normal. The annual pageant of giant balloons, floats, cheerleaders, clowns, marching bands, Broadway performances and celebs is one of the best NYC events in November.
This year, spectators will be able to enjoy live bands, high-flying balloons and more. All volunteers and staff will have to be vaccinated and will also be wearing masks. The number of parade participants will also be reduced this year as an extra precaution, down about 20 percent from past years. 
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  • Attractions
  • The Bronx

The Bronx Zoo’s sparkling seasonal celebration featuring animated lights and LED displays of animals from around the world is back this year. Expect the zoo to have close to 260 animal lanterns across geographically representative "lantern safaris" from various corners of the world. Wind your way around the zoo's five trails—Africa, Asia, Latin America, North America and Oceans—to see glowing animals from each continent. On the Africa trail, you'll see giraffes, cheetahs, zebras, lions, lemurs, gorillas, okapi, African gray parrots, and chimpanzees. On the Latin America trail, you can say "hello" to macaws, jaguars, crocodiles, and flamingos, plus all-new guanacos, puma, elephant seals, anaconda, river turtles, and spider monkeys. On the Ocean trail, you'll go "under the sea" of lights and see penguins, sea turtles, dolphins, corals, sea lions, spotted rays, and nurse sharks. Not only that, but there will be a new Forest of Color with 21 all-new larger-than-life lanterns representing toads, frogs, snails, sunbirds, turtles, moths, butterflies, and more. Across the whole experience, there are 79 new lanterns representing 30 new animal species. There is also holiday-themed music throughout the experience, live ice carvings, costumed characters, stilt walkers, a holiday train, a wildlife theater, souvenirs and seasonal treats like hot chocolate and s’mores that you can roast and assemble yourself!

  • Things to do
  • City Life

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden is bringing a gorgeous, new after-dark illuminated spectacular to its grounds in November. Between November 19 and January 9, visitors to BBG will be able to walk through the Cathedral of Light tunnel, a Fire Garden on Lily Pool Terrace, a Field of Light and an animated light installation covering Cherry Esplanade (and visible from the Robert W. Wilson Overlook). Colorful light displays highlighting the garden’s trees, landscapes, and architecture with more than 18 distinct works of light art and a series of light-based artworks by local artists will be installed in the Plant Family Collection. "Lightscape" is coming to BBG in partnership with Sony Music. It was launched at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in London in 2014 and has sold out year after year across the U.K. and in Chicago. This is currently the only East Coast Lightscape (lucky, us!). Lightscape tickets, which are $34 and $18 for children under 12, must be purchased in advance and time slots may sell out. 

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  • Shopping
  • Union Square

One of NYC's best holiday markets is returning in November after a year away. The Urbanspace Union Square Holiday Market, the alfresco, European-style winter market with more than 150 local and national vendors, returns November 18.

On Sunday, November 21st from 11am-2pm, visit the west plaza to snap your family’s holiday card picture in its iconic snow globe, grab sweets and treats from local Union Square businesses, enjoy caroling, entertainment and giveaways.

This year, expect to see New York Ukrainian favorite Veselka, Breezy Hill Orchard Cider and Piccolo Cafe as well as handcrafted art and wares include first-time vendor eMCee Apparel who will showcase her own twist on Jean-Michel Basquiat-inspired art with apparel that pays tribute to hip-hop icons as well as returning vendor Dash of Pep, a boutique creating unique apparel, accessories, and stationery promoting mental health, self-expression, and empowerment. Nick Heller (@NewYorkNico) will have his own booth that'll showcase Gizmo Vintage, Challah Dolly, Prince Peacock, Em and Ahr, and Dan’s Parents House for one week each.

  • Movies
  • Science fiction

A movie that knows exactly what its audience wants and dishes it out in big ectoplasmic dollops, Ghostbusters: Afterlife manages to be full of surprises and completely unsurprising all at once. A feast of callbacks bolted onto a serviceable, if familiar, plot, it’s delivered by co-writer-director Jason Reitman – son of Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters II shot-caller Ivan – with enough heart to elevate it above your average franchise reboot. No doubt to the dismay of the trolls who harassed Leslie Jones and co in the wake of Paul Feig’s gender-swapping 2016 Ghostbusters, Afterlife also beats to the pulse of a female protagonist. The impressive Mckenna Grace is nebbish tween science buff Phoebe, a New Yorker dragged to a dusty, eerie corner of Oklahoma with her brother Trevor (Finn Wolfhard, amping up the obvious Stranger Things vibes) by her struggling single mum (Carrie Coon)...

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

The future is here: You can now order and pick-up your skinny vanilla latte without having to take out your wallet at the very first cashierless Starbucks, located in New York. A partnership between two retail giants, the new destination is located inside an Amazon Go store on 59th Street between Park and Lexington Avenues. Customers get to place their orders on the Starbucks app, head to the new shop, check on the status of their drink on a digital screen, grab it from a barista and just walk out without reaching for cash or a credit card thanks to Amazon Go's "Just Walk Out" technology. In addition to the full coffee menu, expect a curated assortment of food and beverages in the Amazon market portion of the space—think snacks, pre-made salads, sandwiches, pastries and more.

  • Movies
  • Drama

You could be forgiven for being cynical about King Richard. The extraordinary Venus and Serena Williams, two of the greatest players in women’s tennis history, here become supporting characters in a drama about their dad, Richard. Oh look, Hollywood has found a man’s story to tell. It’s to the credit of director Reinaldo Marcus Green and star Will Smith that this film makes the case for its counter-intuitive focal point. Smith’s Richard Williams is a husband, security guard and father to five over-achieving daughters with his second wife Brandy (Aunjanue Ellis). Their youngest two, Venus (Saniyya Sidney) and Serena (Demi Singleton), have been groomed for tennis greatness according to a plan Williams drew up before they were born. His hopes seems grandiose at best, deluded at worst, as he tours tennis clubs in search of coaches, sponsors or just discarded tennis balls. But Williams keeps on, pushing his children in a way that might be hard to forgive if he didn’t push himself harder...

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

The Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park, open now through March 6, is poised to once again be one of the most exciting attractions this season. In fact, in addition to the over 170 holiday shops, kiosks and eateries that make up the destination, the village will play host to two exciting activities for New Yorkers to revel in. First up: a series of cozy igloos that are heated and overlook the park's iconic skating rink. Inside the clear and intimate structures, each one decorated with holiday cheer in mind, patrons can order delicious food and drinks to enjoy among friends or family (each igloo can accommodate up to eight guests). If it's something a bit more active that you're looking to do, consider visiting the on-site Curling Café, which will offer the first-ever iceless curling experience. Expect dedicated curling lanes where two teams of up to four people each can play some "street" (also known as iceless) curling for an hour-and-a-half. According to an official press release, the lanes are accompanied by "a private, heated dome where teams can warm up and share seasonal drinks and bites between games."

 

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

The Moxy Times Square hotel’s rooftop is open year-round for drinks, food and NYC skyline views, but its 10,000-square-foot space might look a little different depending on when you visit. Magic Hour, on the hotel’s 18th floor, gets a timely refresh each season with new, Instagrammable installations. Starting Friday, November 19, Magic Hour’s Pink Rose Garden The reimagined space is lined with pink logs, and its cozy carousel section is adorned in frosted pink blooms and 25,000 faux-crystals, with seats fashioned after ski-lifts. In addition to that obvious photo-op, a flower arch crowned with pink antler chandeliers is primed for posing, and a pink gondola is nestled in matching pine trees on the rooftop’s east side. Ice skates and ersatz diamond-encrusted skis further accessorize the space. Magic Hour’s wintery cocktails include the tequila-based Double Pink Diamond and the especially apt Après Ski, with vodka, white chocolate liqueur, soy milk and mini marshmallows. Seasonal sweets like glitter-dusted ‘Pink Bling’ donut rings and cotton candy-topped s’mores stacks are also on the menu. 

 

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

The Ready Rooftop, which opened at the Moxy East Village earlier this year, has become Palm Holiday for the season, festooned with leafy foliage, string light-adorned palm trees, pineapple decor, shades of red and green and even frozen cocktails for the occasion. A glass retractable roof ensures temperate climes and skyline views, while beachy lounge chairs, vintage suitcases and a poolside-style photo-op complete the theme. Flocks of pink flamingos deck Christmas trees top to bottom and mini-birds garnish drinks. Timely tipples include the rum-based "Spice Spice Baby" and a frozen hot chocolate with vodka, chocolate liqueur, RumChata and whipped cream. Should you choose brews, can koozies will keep your hands warm and add some holiday cheer, with topical, reimagined phrases like “it’s the most wonderful time for a beer” and “jolly AF.” Nachos and tacos are also available. 

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Midtown West

You’ll get a kick out of this holiday stalwart, which still features Santa, wooden soldiers and the dazzling Rockettes. In recent years, new music, more eye-catching costumes and advanced technology have been introduced to bring audience members closer to the performance. Whatever faults one may find with this awesomely lavish annual pageant (it's basically a celebration of the virtues of shopping), this show has legs. And what legs! In the signature kick line that finds its way into most of the big dance numbers, the Rockettes’ 36 flawless pairs of gams rise and fall like the batting of an eyelash, their perfect unison a testament to the disciplined human form. This is precision dancing on a massive scale—a Busby Berkeley number come to glorious life—and it takes your breath away.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the Radio City Christmas Spectacular

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  • Things to do
  • Astoria

You can see the Grinch come to life at the Museum of the Moving Image this holiday season.

"A Wonderful, Awful Idea" features 40 sketches, animation cels and backgrounds from the extensive private collection of animation enthusiasts Bill Heeter and Kristi Correa and show what it was like adapting Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas.

Instead of the black, white and red palatte used in the original book from 1957, animation director Chuck Jones used vivid colors in the film as well as "unparalleled character animation and comic timing, creating an utterly believable, villainous—but ultimately redeemed—Grinch that became the standard for all subsequent adaptations," MoMI says.

The made-for-television short about a grouchy curmudgeon who tries to ruin Christmas first aired by CBS in 1966. It's become an enduring holiday classic that you can celebrate at this exhibit.

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Fifth Avenue's Pulitzer Fountain has transformed into a winter wonderland for the holiday season. On Wednesday, the Fifth Avenue Association unveiled its "The Fifth Season" installation featuring 32 hand-crafted animal sculptures by Harlequin Designs in Brooklyn, 5,000 feet of lighting, a skating rink and 24 handmade icebergs surrounding the Pulitzer Fountain, all accompanied by music from composer Paul Brill. The installation builds on last year’s "Make It Bright" series of glowing oversized toys, including a teddy bear, dreidel and red truck adorning Fifth Avenue from 47th to 60th Streets.

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  • Things to do
  • Soho

The Museum of Ice Cream is turning pink for the holidays during "Pinkmas." 

From November 18 to January 9, its 13 multi-sensory installations will burst with snowflakes, candy canes, pink trees, interactive moments, from crafting ornaments and decorating the MOIC trees, to tasting sweet treats that celebrate the season’s festive spirit. You can also hunt for the candy cane sprinkle hidden in MOIC NYC’s world-famous Sprinkle Pool for a special surprise and sing along to carols. Guests are encouraged to bring in new toys for Toys For Tots in exchange for a scoop of ice cream and encouraged to come dressed in their pinkest Pinkmas attire. 

  • Theater
  • Circuses & magic
  • Upper West Side

After declaring bankruptcy in 2016 to widespread lamentations, the family-friendly circus came bouncing back to life at Lincoln Center a year later, and now returns for its 43nd season with an all-new show. Ringmaster and acrobat Alan Silva (America's Got Talent) presides over a spectacle that includes aerialist Nik Wallenda and his famous circus kin as well as comic daredevil Johnny Rockett, dachshund wrangler Diana Vedyashkina and an international cast of astonishing speciality artists. Philip Wm. McKinley, who presided over the post–Julie Taymor version of Broadway's Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, serves as director and choreographer. (Schedules vary from week to week so be sure to check the curtain time.)

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  • Things to do
  • Exhibitions
  • The Bronx

The beloved New York holiday train tradition at the New York Botanical Garden is back for its 30th year!

The garden will become a mini-train depot with its collection of 25 G-scale model trains that'll chug along a nearly half-mile track (which is also overhead) by 175 miniature NYC landmarks like the Empire State Building, Radio City Music Hall, the Statue of Liberty, Brooklyn Bridge and Rockefeller Center—all made of natural materials such as leaves, cinnamon sticks, twigs, bark and berries. 

Tickets are on sale now for the show, which begins November 20.

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Midtown West

Holly-Anne Devlin's evening of naughty-and-nice entertainment mixes plentiful liquor with performers from the worlds of burlesque, cirque and musical theater. Jada Temple serves as the mistress of ceremonies, Madam Lulu, joined by a rotating cast that includes Omar Edwards, Dirty Martini, LouLou D’vil, Opera Gaga, Joey Taranto, Sarah Meahl, Kristin Yancy, Alec Varcas, Megan Campbell, Lauren Mary Moore, Miss Miranda, Tansy Burlesque, Audrey Love, Bassam Kubba and Mendel Roman, Melike Konur, Làszlò Major, Mike Pugliese, Allison Schieler, Syrena, Karma Stylez, Peekaboo Pointe and contortionist Aryn. As a bonus, it's a surprisingly good deal if you like to drink: The ticket price includes an appetizer and five custom cocktails.  

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

New Yorkers who just can't wait for the return of Netflix hit show Stranger Things are likely going to jump at the chance to visit the first-ever pop-up shop dedicated to the series. The new store will take up residence in Times Square, on the corner of 42nd Street and Seventh Avenue. Inside, you'll be able to peruse through some of the most iconic settings and locations from the show. Yes, that includes a mock-up of the Upside Down. Speaking of: there is a hidden Demogorgon somewhere in there, so do keep your eyes peeled for that one. Expect to play games at the Palace Arcade, shop at the Starcourt Mall, go inside Joyce's house, visit the infamous Russian lab and even be part of the snowball dance at Hawkins Middle.

  • Art
  • The Bronx

Opening on November 10, the Bronx Museum of the Art's AIM Biennial "Bronx Calling" will showcase works that highlight the practice of everyday life in uncertain times. The 68 participating artists created works in response to multiple crises of health, grief, the environment and identity, including Yan Chen’s 8-foot-tall "High Palate" sculpture highlights the basic need of shelter by having viewers experience the intimate space of a pallet (the roof of a mouth) on an architectural scale and "All the Way to Hell" by artist Eliza Evan gives away mineral rights to a small property in Oklahoma to 1,000 people to impede the interest of oil and gas frackers. Jesse Kreuzer's work looks at current issues in American politics with a monumental 8-panel and 30-foot-long painting of a chaotic moment during a protest and Maggie Hazen’s work looks at the lost identities and voices of imprisoned girls at the Columbia Secure Center for Girls, a maximum security facility in New York’s Hudson Valley.

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Although the city's omakase scene is getting pretty crowded, a new project by Maki Kosaka, the sister restaurant of Michelin-starred Kosaka, might strike your fancy given the unconventionality of its offerings. Tucked behind Maki Kosaka's main temaki counter, a new eight-seat omakase bar helmed by chef Sho Boo is officially open to the public at 55 West 19th Street. For $150 per person, plus tax and gratuity, diners will be treated to a regional form of omakase that might not necessarily look like the traditional nigiri-style sushi that New Yorkers are accustomed to. From a chef-selected amuse-bouche (that is: a bite-sized hors d'oeuvre) to some pressed cube sushi and pieces of temari ("handball" sushi), fans of the Japanese cuisine will likely revel in the novelty of the destination's menu. 

  • Music
  • Music

There is something about the talent of musicians in uptown Manhattan that simply cannot be authentically replicated in other New York neighborhoods—and the folks at the Cloak Room, a relatively new jazz speakeasy in Hamilton Heights, know that. Taking over the space previously occupied by Hogshead Tavern, which permanently closed during the pandemic, the Cloak Room opened this past September. Using the lockdown as an opportunity to re-invent, Hogshead Tavern co-owners Tara Wholley and Ady De Luna decided to move away from the structure of the bar that had become a neighborhood favorite and instead honor the musical legacy of Harlem by opening a spot dedicated to jazz.

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  • Art
  • Chelsea

The recent eruption of the Fagradalsfjall volcano in Iceland inspired interdisciplinary artist and musician Jónsi (of Sigur Rós) to create two new sound installations and sculptural works that infuse the senses, including ambient sounds, mechanically generated frequencies, samples from nature,  his own voice as well as earthy, atmospheric fragrances that help to transport viewers. On the ground floor, visitors enter a darkened room that has a central plinth surrounded by about two hundred speakers that'll play a choral hymn in four parts added to soundscapes of gritty rocks and searing lava. It'll be layered over with smoky, tar-like aromas of fossilized amber to further transport his audience into the belly of a volcano...

  • Art
  • Art

Although most of Hilma af Klint's work is held by the artist's official foundation and isn't currently on view anywhere, New Yorkers will get to browse through a rare set of her watercolors through December 18 at the David Zwirner gallery on 69th Street. Dubbed "Tree of Knowledge," the exhibit focuses on the artist's 1913-1915 series of works, which were recently discovered by the art world. If the success of the Guggenheim's 2018 exhibition "Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future" is of any indication, we expect many people to flock to the Upper East Side gallery in the next few months. Fair warning: appointments are required to see the work in person, so make sure to schedule a visit right here.

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  • Art
  • Art

Inside Chelsea Market's old boiler room, there's an art show opening today that explores New York City’s past and potential future with trippy digital art that unfolds all around you. "Machine Hallucination: NYC" by Refik Anadol was originally on view at ARTECHOUSE two years ago when the venue first opened, but for the first time, NFTs will be available to visitors who want to purchase pieces of Anadol's art. "Machine Hallucination: NYC" is NYC's latest immersive experience that uses artificial intelligence and the latest technology to map a massive dataset (more than 100 million publicly available photographs of New York’s iconic architecture and urban landscapes without people) and shows AI re-imaginings of NYC set to "awe-inspiring" sound design by Berlin-based composer Kerim Karaoglu who used New York’s sound archives with machine intelligence. 

  • Theater
  • Interactive
  • Bushwick

No show in town offers as intimate an experience as this interactive experience in Bushwick that has been created to be performed for just five audience members at a time. A surreal look at the nature of ritual and ceremony, Bottom of the Ocean is the third production from Andrew Hoepfner’s company Houseworld Immersive, and draws on techniques that Hoepfner explored previously in Houseworld and Whisperlodge. It is staged at Gymnopedie, a multiroom space that has been created by restoring 5,500 square feet of the 19th-century basement at Bushwick United Methodist Church. 

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  • Restaurants
  • East Harlem

Restaurant reservations may be NYC’s most competitive sport. (Take our baseball teams, please.) I have half-a-dozen Resy notifications set at any given time and only two have come through in the past several months. As a result, snagging a hot table always feels like a win. Contento opened on 111th Street in June and swiftly garnered extensive press—and tons of buzz—surrounding its important, and often woefully overlooked, mission of providing “accessibility to all.” About half of Contento’s bar is positioned at a height to accommodate wheelchair users, its tables are slightly raised to do the same and adaptive utensils are available on request. Sommelier Yannick Benjamin (previously of Le Cirque and Jean-Georges) and business partner George Gallego considered these details as wheelchair users themselves. Chef Oscar Lorenzzi (the Waverly Inn, Marseille) authored the Peruvian-influenced menu that includes some early highlights...

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

If you're still reluctant to dine indoors this winter, you might want to consider heading to Nowadays in Bushwick, where the signature large backyard has just been winterized. And, yes, their usual yurts and heated tables are back for the season as well. Diner by Izakaya, the food operator at the destination, has just unveiled its latest menu, which sounds like it will really hit the spot in the colder months. Inspired by "famiresu" restaurants in Japan (that would be family-friendly eateries), the new menu is anchored by two main ramen offerings (tonkotsu, made with pork, and tantan, made with soy, sesame and miso broth with tempe). Other food standouts include an izakaya tempeh sandwich with shredded cabbage, vegan mayo and vegan miso; a wagyu burger with lettuce, tomato, pickles and Japanese BBQ sauce; and a fried chicken zangi sandwich. Drinks wise, warm beverages take center stage. From hot toddies to spiked hot cocoa, the libations take the cold into account but "regular" cocktails, beer and wine are also available. 

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

We'll be honest: we're not always the biggest fans of 230 Fifth. Don't get us wrong: the views from up there are beautiful and the drinks are delicious, but the rooftop gets pretty crowded during the year. Yet, once winter rolls around, we can't help but feel the pull of the midtown destination, when the staff sets up the famous heated igloos that we could spend all season in. The glowing cocoons, which opened to the public yesterday, will stay in place through April 15 and, as usual, will be able to accommodate up to ten guests at once. Yes, you'll still find warm red snuggies for use inside each one. Although reservations are suggested—especially if heading there with a group of six or more—the igloos are also accessible by walk-ins pending availability. You can plan your visit right here.

  • Nightlife
  • Nightlife

If you're eager to embrace the raging '20s we were promised (and not the pandemic '20s we were given), an enormous new nightclub has your back. Nebula will bring a multi-level 11,000-square-foot club to 135 W. 41st Street on Friday, November 5. With a capacity for 700 guests, Nebula will be the largest club to open in Manhattan in years. A 5,500-square-foot dance floor offers plenty of space to show off your moves, plus a mezzanine level and lower level with three private club rooms dedicated to private groups (complete with their own dedicated bathrooms) lets you customize your going out experience. Think: Over-the-top karaoke nights, a seated dinner for twenty or a small dance party with your closest friends.

 

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

A new audio tour by the Brooklyn Public Library seeks to explore the lives of the characters and authors that call the borough home in fiction and in real life. From Patti Smith to Biggie Smalls, Howard Zinn to Tanwi Nandini Islam, the guide covers a total of 16 writers over eight miles of Brooklyn. You can also expect to stop at important public libraries the likes of Washington Irving and Clinton Hill, which, according to an official press release, "played an important role in the lives of the featured author[s]." Expect the entire tour, which can virtually start off from anywhere in Brooklyn, to take at least two hours to complete, depending on how many stops you wish to make along the way.

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Visitors will find about 3,000 new and used books inside the unusual store at any given moment. They run the gamut in terms of genre—from children's to classics, best sellers and more is actually the point of the whole endeavor. Currently, the bus works by appointment. When hired, DeVaughn drives to schools, temples and shelters and allows visitors to shop inside for free. Other times, she'll head to events like the Bronx Night Market and Riverdale Y Sunday Market free of charge and sell her books to those in attendance. Per her estimates, she has already sold or given out about 7,000 books this calendar year.

 

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  • Things to do
  • Markets and fairs

The Bank of America Winter Village at Bryant Park is back with holiday festivities and shopping and food at its holiday shops. Its 17,000-square-foot ice-skating rink that's free to use (if you bring your own skates) is always the highlight, but its Winter Village in all its holiday spirit is a close second. This year more than 170 kiosks will be there to peruse—all at one of the best NYC parks.

 

  • Art
  • Midtown West

The Shed's galleries are being transformed daily with multi-sensory installations that immerse the viewer to inspire reconnection to nature.

Presented by The Shed and Superblue, "Fragile Future" by Amsterdam-based artists DRIFT takes its audiences on a journey through multiple installations that encourage exploring the universal search for origin, destination, and connection, as well as the power to be found in relinquishing control when embracing change.

Set to a soundtrack by ANOHNI, the journey begins with the shimmering lights of  "Coded Coincidence" that follow the flight pattern that elm seeds take each spring so that viewers can see the "necessity and beauty of coincidence and its essential role in our natural processes and evolution." As they fall to the ground and fade, "Ego," a large block made of hair-thin illuminated threads is suspended and morphs in mid-air. Another installation, "Fragile Future," brings nature and technology together to evoke a utopian vision of the future of our planet, "wherein two seemingly opposite evolutions have made a pact to survive."

As the final installation, "Drifters" uses a series of projected films to represent a portal to another world with a group of concrete blocks that float through environments in NYC and other locations and pass through lush nature and dystopian urban settings in search for their origin and destination. On select dates, "Drifters" will become a surreal immersive performance that spans The Shed’s four-story-high, 17,000-square-foot McCourt space.

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Overthrow Hospitality—the group behind New York favorites Amor y Amargo, Ladybird and Death and Co., among others—has just debuted an attention-grabbing champagne and absinthe bar in the East Village that is inspired by... hell. Café de L’Enfer, which literally translates to "hell cafe" from the French, opened earlier this month and the decor is just as striking as the cocktails, developed by mixologist Sother Teague. The destination, which calls out to the famous Victorian-era Cabaret de l'Enfer in Paris, is filled with touches of the underworld. Expect skulls, deep red booths and ogre-like statues to adorn the dark space, located directly above Amor y Amargo.

  • Comedy
  • Comedy

A modest storage room at Bushwick's Tiny Cupboard has been transformed into a psychedelic comedy room dedicated to booking female, BIPOC and queer comics. "The Mushroom," which seats only about 22 people making it the tiniest comedy room in NYC, just had its grand opening on Friday within The Tiny Cupboard—an already small DIY comedy space on Cooper Street. The Tiny Cupboard was the perfect place to open The Mushroom not only because it offers that much-needed intimate experience but because it is giving comedians from the BIPOC and queer communities a space to perform where they are not in the minority. On Saturday, The Mushroom will host the first edition of "The Tribe," a lineup of all Black comics with Ann Walker, for instance.

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  • Nightlife
  • Nightlife

One of Texas' best exports to New York City is getting a new Manhattan location this monday. Alamo Drafthouse, the cinema known for serving restaurant-quality food and drinks during its screenings, has opened its second New York location in Manhattan. Adding to its downtown Brooklyn location, Alamo Drafthouse's second NYC location is at 28 Liberty St. with fourteen auditoriums that seat up to 578 guests in total. The theater chain is known for its luxury reclining seats with built-in tables and cupholders. It's like being in an elite private screening room, but anyone can buy a ticket. Movie buffs at Alamo's Lower Manhattan location will be treated to 4K digital projection and 7.1 Dolby surround sound. The opening screenings include current blockbusters like No Time to Die, and Marvel's Eternals as well as classics like 1933's original King Kong

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

There's a brand-new dumpling destination downtown, and it's over a year in the making. Dumpling Lab, founded by Hunan Slurp's Chef Xiaomei Ma and partners Chao Wang and Lu Dong, brings even more contemporary Chinese food to the East Village with its new seafood-focused menu, inspired by the Chinese city of Tsingtao. Mackerel Dumplings made with Spanish mackerel, pork, chive and dried shellfish are a menu standout. To embrace the diversity of Tsingtao's culinary culture, Ma also added dumpling flavors like organic chicken dumplings with wood ear and corn, plus zucchini and cucumber dumplings with eggs and vermicelli.

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  • Theater
  • Circuses & magic
  • Chelsea

Todd Robbins (Play Dead) is a sideshow master who combines technical expertise with humor, historical knowledge and good old-fashioned showmanship. In his soirees at the McKittrick's Club Car venue, he welcomes a live jazz pianist to set the atmosphere and guest magicians (such as Alex Boyce, Jason Suran, Mark Calabrese, Matthew Holtzclaw, Prakash Puru and Rachel Wax) to perform feats of close-up magic in an intimate setting.

  • Restaurants
  • Chinese
  • Midtown East

As of October 11, Hutong offers Flaming Peking Duck three nights a week (Monday through Wednesday), which is a dining experience like no other. Air-dried for 36-hours and infused with the finest Sichuan green chillies, star anise, ground black pepper and Hutong’s homemade chilli paste, the duck’s skin is perfectly crisp and seasoned. It's roasted for 40 minutes before being set on fire with Chinese rose wine and rum, emitting a heavenly scent that wafts through the dining room as the flames rise from the pan right at your table. The chef delicately carves the duck tableside through fire to release mouthwatering, aromatic flavours with every bite. The duck is then served with traditional handmade steamed pancakes, and is uniquely paired with shredded papaya, sweet cantaloupe, alongside traditional cucumber and spring onions. With two sauces available, guests can opt between the traditional duck sauce or the new honey mustard sauce which pairs beautifully with the duck’s fragrant spices.

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating
Ci Siamo, the highly anticipated new Italian restaurant by chef Hillary Sterling and Danny Meyer's Union Square Hospitality Group, opens today!  Meaning "we’ve arrived” in Italian, Ci Siamo bridges the traditional with the contemporary, with a menu centered around live-fire cooking and inspired by Sterling's travels. Dinner at Ci Siamo begins with freshly baked breads like a cast iron focaccia served with tomato conserva and a grilled sourdough with artichoke salmoriglio and mint. If you don't fill up on bread (nice work!), continue with starters like a seafood salad with castelvetrano olives and aleppo pepper or a pizza bianca with anchovy, salsa verde and aioli. Like much of the menu, this pizza has a specific origin: A dish Sterling enjoyed in a small trattoria on a past trip to Piedmont.
  • Things to do
  • Chelsea

Dopl, a technology company that specializes in 3-D technology, printing, and development, is popping up at Chelsea Market to make 3D miniature figures of visitors who come in and take a full-body scan. Coming in a range of sizes from four to 14 inches, Dopls can be made for everyone including pets. Located in Chelsea Market’s main thoroughfare, it'll be open from 10am – 8pm Monday through Saturday and 11am – 7pm on Sundays. Walk-ins are welcome or reservations can be made.

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  • Art
  • Washington Heights

Get a rare glimpse of one of the major art forms of the Hispanic World from 1500 to 1800—polychrome sculpture. The Hispanic Museum & Library is hosting the first exhibit in New York to feature this kind of art in two decades. Over 20 sculptures, including major works by women artists such as Luisa Roldán and Andrea de Mena, show how the stylistic conventions of Spain were adapted in the New World. Among the works on view, visitors will see a monumental relief of the Resurrection attributed to Gil de Siloe, 16th-century reliquary busts by Juan de Juni and "St. Acisclus" by Pedro de Mena. A section of gilded figures will showcase sculptures from Latin America characterized by an impressive range of scale and emotion, including a 16th-century relief of Santiago Matamoros (St. James the moorslayer) from Mexico and the "Virgin of Quito" or "St. Michael" as well as Caspicara’s "Four Fates of Man." Expect to see works by El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, and Sorolla; sculpture by Pedro de Mena and Luisa Roldán; Latin American paintings and sculpture by Vázquez, Luis Juárez, López de Arteaga, Rodríguez Juárez, Caspicara, Campeche, and Arrieta.

  • Things to do
  • Walks and tours
  • Greenwood

Learn about the lives of Green-Wood Cemetery’s permanent residents on this trek, which rotates among three routes (so check the schedule ahead of time if you’re set on seeing a specific tombstone). All tours include a look at the cemetery’s historic chapel and Battle Hill, where George Washington led the Continental Army in the Battle of Brooklyn in 1776.

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

NYC & Company's newest program may make indulging in the city's culture a little more tempting, with "It's Time for Culture" offering deals at museums, cultural institutions, performing arts venues and Off Broadway shows. Deals include two-for-one admission, 25% off tickets and more at over 40 venues throughout October. "It's Time for Culture" participants include Carnegie Hall, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Whitney Museum of American Art, Jewish Museum, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, National Lighthouse Museum, New York Botanical Garden, Alice Austen House Museum, Museum of the Moving Image, China Institute and Gallery, Lehman Center for Performing Arts, plays including those at Repertorio Español and En Garde Arts, and Perfect Crime—the longest-running Off-Broadway production—and more.  

  • Theater
  • Musicals
  • Midtown West

Who doesn’t enjoy a royal wedding? The zingy Broadway musical Six celebrates, in boisterous fashion, the union of English dynastic history and modern pop music. On a mock concert stage, backed by an all-female band, the six wives of the 16th-century monarch Henry VIII air their grievances in song, and most of them have plenty to complain about: two were beheaded, two were divorced, one died soon after childbirth. In this self-described “histo-remix,” members of the long-suffering sextet spin their pain into bops; the queens sing their heads off and the audience loses its mind.  That may be for the best, because Six is not a show that bears too much thinking about. Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss wrote it when they were still students at Cambridge University, and it has the feel of a very entertaining senior showcase. Its 80 minutes are stuffed with clever turns of rhyme and catchy pastiche melodies that let mega-voiced singers toss off impressive “riffs to ruffle your ruffs.” The show's own riffs on history are educational, too, like a cheeky new British edition of Schoolhouse Rock. If all these hors d’oeuvres don’t quite add up to a meal, they are undeniably tasty...

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating
Anassa Taverna's new location in Battery Park, at 104 North End Ave., serves upscale, Modern Greek cuisine that eases the pain of currently not being in Greece, but will likely make you want to book a trip stat. Diners at the new restaurant can select their catch of the day from an icy fish display, showcasing seafood flown in from the Mediterranean. Each diner's pick, which is priced by the pound, is then grilled and served whole with lemon and olive oil.  If you prefer to skip the grill, a full raw bar offers a selection of clams, oysters and other crustaceans, which are all available as a seafood tower. Starring on the menu is Anassa's lobster spaghetti, served in a whole lobster. Fan favorites, like Greek salad with feta from a small farm South of Athens and Cretan olive oil, charbroiled octopus and a tower of thinly sliced zucchini and eggplant chips served with tzatziki are also served. 
  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Eataly Flatiron’s rooftop has shed its spring greenhouse theme and emerge with a burst of fresh fall foliage. The new look, designed by the returning Milky Way Studio, is intended to evoke the changing flora of the Italian countryside right around this time of year. Take the elevator up to the 14th floor, and you’ll step into a kaleidoscope of verdant green and sunset hues of vibrant orange, amber and crimson, all winding up the walls and crisscrossing in a canopy overhead. Serra’s menu has been re-written, too, to focus on the flavors of fall. Eataly chefs source produce from the nearby Union Square Greenmarket in search of the harvest’s best, and over the next few months the restaurant will spotlight individual local farms, too. North Dutchess County’s Migliorelli Farm is first, and its honeycrisp apples will feature in the insalata di radicchio e mele. The menu also includes arancini, fried calamari, sharable snacks like the chef’s selection of meat and cheese, and ravioli, campanelle and tagliatelle plates. 

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  • Things to do
  • Chelsea

The Rubin Museum is offering a unique exhibit that delves into the power of difficult emotions and how to turn them into positive ones—something many of us would benefit from these days. On the third floor of the museum, the Mandala Lab uses fun and interactive tools to explore jealousy/envy, attachment, pride, anger and ignorance and shows visitors how to turn them into wisdom of accomplishment, discernment, equanimity, mirror-like wisdom and all-accommodating wisdom, respectively. How this is done is through four quadrants across the floor, based on the Sarvavid Vairochana Mandala, a Tibetan Buddhist mandala that is used as a visualization tool to help achieve enlightenment. Each quadrant represents an emotion and has a playful activity to navigate it, including a "gong orchestra," a "breathing alcove" and a "scent library."

  • Art
  • Art

Giant origami-inspired sculptures now decorate Broadway, bringing a child-like whimsy to the Garment District. The installation, entitled "Hacer: Transformations," features seven massive paper-like animals: two dark turquoise coyotes, two medium turquoise rabbits, a magenta elephant, a yellow dog and a green bear cub. It's located on the public plazas of Broadway Boulevard in the Garment District between 36th and 39th Streets and will be there through November 23. The installation is part of Garment District Art on the Plazas, a year-round public art program made possible through Arterventions, part of the New York City Department of Transportation’s Art Program. 

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  • Things to do
  • Hell's Kitchen

Photoville is back in its 10th year and the second to bring photography to every borough of
New York City.

The free, outdoor, pet-friendly photography exhibition is heading to NYC Parks — Brooklyn Bridge Park, Astoria Park, Barretto Point Park, Chelsea Park, Jackie Robinson Park, East River Promenade, St. Nicholas Park, Travers Park, Van Cortlandt Park, the South Beach Promenade — as well as Brookfield Place, the Alice Austen House (Staten Island), the Lower East Side at the Abrons Arts Center and Times Square. 

You won't want to miss this year's Photoville because it is packed with 75 exhibits outside and free online programming for photo lovers between September 18 and December 1, including panel discussions, interactive workshops, one-on-one safety clinics,  professional development opportunities with Diversify Photo and Leica Camera, Photo Wings and the NYC Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment.

New this year is "Community Day: Photo Festival Opening" on September 18, where there will be a visual storytelling event with a family activity area by Stoop Stories, Brooklyn Children’s Museum, and Aperture; the Penumbra TinType Sessions; pop-up music and dance
performances by the Haiti Cultural Exchange; exhibition tours by featured artists; photo
puzzles on the lawn; a professional development educator lab; photo workshops with Leica
Camera and Adobe; a Smorgasburg pop-up; and an evening screening of 10 Under 10
enlisting the New York Times, National Geographic, Pulitzer Center, and more. Musicians from Carnegie Hall will serenade the audience with lullabies.

Highlights of this year's exhibitions include:

"1000 Years of Joys and Sorrows," by Ai Weiwei
"TAXI: Journey Through My Windows 1977-1987," by Joseph Rodriguez
"Secrets of the Whales" by Brian Skerry for National Geographic
"Bronx Life," by David Gonzalez
"Last Chapter of War in Afghanistan," by Paula Bronstein
"Rebel Vision: Black Women Photojournalists"
"Diaspora on the Frontline," by Rosem Morton

Find a full list of hours and events on Photoville's website.

  • Things to do
  • East Williamsburg

Nationally-recognized comedy show, UpDating, is finally returning to the stage after a long year away. Deal with your dating hang-ups front and center at this live romantic experiment. Two New Yorkers will be paired on-stage for a blind date, and you get to join in on the magic (or the meltdown). The show comes from NY-Based Comedian Brandon Berman and Dating Blogger Harrison Forman. For more details you can check out UpDating's Instagram @updatingshow.

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  • Art
  • Astoria

The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum are showcasing a collaborative exhibition with Eleni Petaloti and Leonidas Trampoukis of the Greece- and New York-based studio Objects of Common Interest. Works by Petaloti and Trampoukis, who take an intuitive approach to object and space making inspired by “moments of unfamiliar simplicity,” are interspersed within The Noguchi Museum’s garden and first-floor permanent installation.

  • Art
  • Art

Andy Warhol's photography is getting its own exhibit at Fotografiska this fall that will showcase more than 120 images, 20 of which have never been shown to the public before. "Andy Warhol: Photo Factory," opening September 10, will pay homage to Warhol’s New York City studio and give viewers an inside look at his life and work. They'll come to understand how he experimented with photography and how it served as a springboard for his iconic silkscreen paintings, commissioned portraits, and commercial work.

 

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  • Art
  • Art

Fans of British street artist Banksy, rejoice! "Banksy Expo: Genius or Vandal?," an immersive exhibit featuring a ton of the artist's work, is here. It features over 80 "genuine and certified works belonging to private collections" alongside a "virtual reality experience through the artist's career, created especially for this event." The entire shindig lasts between 60 to 80 minutes and it will be appropriate for guests of all ages. Let's be honest: they had us at "Banksy."

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  • Art
  • Art

A new art installation featuring creations from Grimes, Bon Iver, Miguel and other big-name entertainers is open in Brooklyn. Undercurrent, which is pitched as an “immersive audiovisual” experience, will feature a 60,000 square foot space showcasing celebrity-made art pieces that poignantly explore the ever-increasing climate crisis. Viewers can expect to find imaginative pieces, including Grimes’ AI-created meditations and a multimedia installation from Bon Iver, which will feature a new version of his 2019 song “Naeem” remixed by Chris Hontos. Other artists involved also include Aluna, Actress, Jayda G, Mount Kimbie, and Nosaj Thing.

  • Museums
  • Fashion and costume
  • Prospect Park

The Brooklyn Museum is giving The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute a run for its money this year with its high fashion exhibit featuring the House of Dior. Opening September 10, the major exhibit — co-curated by Dior scholar Florence Müller of the Avenir Foundation Curator of Textile Art and Fashion at the Denver Art Museum — thoroughly explores the high fashion history of The House of Dior, which dates back to the turn of the 20th century, when the brand's namesake Christian Dior founded the label. The multi-gallery exhibit brings many of Dior's sources of inspiration to life, including flowers, nature, classical and contemporary art, featuring artwork from the Brooklyn Museum's collections. Objects on display will be primarily from the extensive Dior archives and some 200 haute couture garments as well as photographs, archival videos, sketches, vintage perfume elements, and accessories.

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  • Art
  • Midtown East

The AKC Museum of the Dog is opening a new exhibit to honor the work of search and rescue dogs during the rescue and recovery efforts on and after 9/11. Highlights include several sculptures from AKC’s DOGNY project that raised over $3.5 million for search and rescue organizations whose dogs directly worked at Ground Zero, winners from the “Salute to Search and Rescue Dogs” art contest hosted by the museum as well as feature portraits by artist Ron Burns, creator of the coffee table book, The Dogs of Ron Burns: A Tribute to the Dogs of 9/11.

"Search and rescue dogs are some of the unsung heroes of 9/11," said Alan Fausel, Executive Director of the AKC Museum of the Dog. "The work they did during the rescue of and recovery efforts is truly extraordinary. All dogs have a job and on this solemn anniversary, we honor those whose job it was to save us."

A free virtual tour of the exhibit will also be available on the Museum’s website shortly
after the exhibit’s opening.

  • Shopping
  • Shopping & Style

The Museum at FIT's "Ravishing: The Rose in Fashion," explores "how the rose has influenced the way we look, dress, feel, and fantasize" with over 130 rose-centric garments, accessories and more. The first major exhibit in the space since the museum closed in March 2020, "Ravishing" will run through November 28. Luxurious, hand-woven and embroidered 18th-century silks, 1960s-era stilettos, 1980s Halston gowns, contemporary gender-neutral catwalk trends and more are featured in the galleries.

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

Stumpy's Hatchet House, NYC's newest axe-throwing venue, is opening at Industry City on September 2. Set across 12,000 rustic square feet, the new venue will have 14 (socially-distanced) throwing pits with two targets each. Throwers get their own coach to teach them how to throw safely and lead games among teams. If axe-throwing isn't your speed or you've finished up your set and want to keep playing, Stumpys also has foosball, cornhole, shuffleboard and giant Jenga surrounded by TV screens playing major sporting events. Apparently, axe-throwing pairs nicely with drinking alcohol as we have learned with Kick Axe Throwing and Hatchets & Hops and the slew of other axe-throwing bars, so Stumpy's will, of course, have a bar—a 700-square-foot bar—serving up craft beer and wine. The cool thing about Stumpy's is that it'll serve food from Industry City tenants, including personal pizzas from Table 87, and for larger group reservations it has partnered with Sahadi’s and Hometown Barbeque & Seasoned by Shalini.

 

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  • Nightlife
  • Nightlife

New York's favorite warehouse party spot is returning this weekend! Bushwick's House of Yes officially reopened on Friday, August 27 after over sixteen months of closure. Guests can catch a dance break in House of Yes' newly redecorated patio garden and front room. Party instructions encourage guests to dress up, as is the norm at this quirky venue. "Looks are mandatory for entry. This is your moment. High style, art vibes, Express your best, brightest and boldest looks," reads the invite. 

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

When Crown Shy opened at the base of the beautiful 70 Pine Street in 2019, it was eerily clear that it was that year’s best new restaurant. Saga, from Crown Shy’s chef James Kent and restaurant partner Jeff Katz, will open on the 63rd floor of that same obscured-in-plain-sight Art Deco building. It is its own restaurant, but comparisons are inevitable. While even an accomplished drinker can get out of dinner at Crown Shy for about $125 on the high end, the minimum spend at Saga will be $245 for an eight-to-ten course tasting that includes one welcome cocktail. The intro drink itself is an obvious narrative device, but let’s go back half a page in any case. To enter Saga, you will pass through 70 Pine’s lobby to the elevators, where you will be escorted dozens of floors up by a host who will speak a bit to the building’s history. The air pressure will change before the doors open to Saga’s lovely bar, which mirrors Crown Shy’s, writ small. As subtle as it is, the lighting might be the first thing to catch your eye. Soft beams enhance the space’s Deco finishes and recall happy times downstairs, or cue new ones to come. Both restaurants share the lighting designer David Weiner, who has created a pattern so unmistakably Crown Shy, or, now Saga, it should be patented. But this is not a drinking bar. You’ll collect your welcome cocktail before you’re shown to one of Saga’s many terraces that make you realize, if you’ve managed not to so far in life, why some people chase money so hard. There are many good views in New York City, but this one feels particularly rich, imbued with the spirit of the building’s top three floors’ almost unbelievable original intended use as an early 20th-century financier’s private home. 

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Chef Jonathan Benno’s Michelin-starred Benno restaurant, which has been temporarily closed since March of 2020, is scheduled to reopen with a French fine dining menu this September, but another eponymous Benno operation is pacing to beat it to the finish line. It is intended as a casual companion to the reimagined Benno. Opening menu items include a fruits de mer plateaux with oysters, jumbo shrimp, Maine lobster remoulade and tuna tartare ($100), escargots ($18) rotisserie chicken ($32) and steak au poivre ($52). A happy hour from 5pm to 7pm each night includes deviled eggs with ossetra caviar ($12), salmon rillettes ($9) and white anchovies ($9.) And cocktails like the Death by Ramos (gin, absinthe, citrus, cream, egg white and Champagne), will be available alongside wine in 250ml and 500ml increments, as well as by the standard glass and bottle.

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Great Jones Distilling Co. opened to the public on August 21, as Manhattan's first and only legal whiskey distillery in over 100 years. Over six years in the making, the 28,000 square foot venue will feature a fully functioning distillery, a tasting room and several drinking and dining venues, including an underground speakeasy and full restaurant to open this fall. The menus are heralded by Executive Chef Adam Raksin, who formerly worked at Per SeVisitors can book several different experiences, including a tour detailing the whiskey making process ($35), a culinary cocktail pairing experience ($145) and a hands-on mixology class ($110). The craft whiskey made at Great Jones starts with grains sourced exclusively from New York state. Exclusive bourbon and rye is available only at the distillery. 

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Roosevelt Island has its first-ever rooftop bar and lounge open to the public. Panorama Room just opened atop the newly opened Graduate Roosevelt Island hotel on the southern end of the island and the views are really unparalleled — perhaps even the best of any rooftop lounge. Located on the 18th floor of the hotel, the "jewel box" space by Med Abrous and Marc Rose, who are food and beverage partners of the hotel and co-founders of the hospitality group Call Mom, opens up to incredible views of the boroughs, the bridges and the East River, which shine like stars at night. Designed by James Beard Award-winning design firm Parts and Labor Design, Panorama Room is visually dramatic. Its palatial vibes are set by luxurious velvet vintage-inspired tubular lounge sofas, chrome and marble touches, mosaic tile columns and its giant, tubular acrylic chandeliers that hover above the massively long bar. It's not only luxe but it's somehow simultaneously futuristic and retro. 

  • Museums
  • Central Park

The Jewish Museum's new exhibit explores the subject of art looting during World War II, focusing on the Nazi's theft of artwork and the journey these some 1 million works (And 2.5 million books) took as they traveled through distribution centers, sites of recovery, and networks of collectors, before, during, and after the war. The exhibition includes paintings, drawings, and Judaica that survived this traumatic period of violence and upheaval against tremendous odds. By tracing the fascinating timelines of individual objects as they passed through hands and sites, their myriad stories will be brought forward, often in dialogue with archival documents and photographs that connect them to history.

Afterlives will include works by major artists that were looted from Jewish collections during the war as well as treasured pieces of Judaica. Rare examples of Jewish ceremonial objects from destroyed synagogues; works by such renowned artists as Pierre Bonnard, Marc Chagall, Paul Cézanne, Gustave Courbet, Paul Klee, Franz Marc, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, and Camille Pissarro, among others; and rarely seen archival photographs and documents will all be on view. 

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating
Somewhere in Nolita, a new rooftop bar from Rivers and Hills Hospitality Group, the team behind popular Lower East Side Thai restaurant (and Time Out Market New York vendorWayla and Japanese-Italian restaurant Kimika, just opened atop The Nolitan Hotel (30 Kenmare St.). Bright, refreshing craft cocktails were designed to emulate the unparalleled open view of Lower Manhattan, and a menu of playful snacks and summery New England seafood-inspired dishes will keep summer going after Labor Day. Plants and green banquets are designed to create a chill, relaxing atmosphere, which is currently table service only. Highlights off the cocktail menu include the Heat Map (tequila, mezcal, watermelon, basil and calabrian chili); Pineapple Over the Sea, which is a tropical take on a Manhattan with Scotch, plum whiskey, plantation pineapple, giffard pineapple, cardamaro and choya umeshu; and Oolong Time Comin, a negroni stirred with pisco, carpano bitter, yellow chartreuse, Pimms, dolin chambery blanc, fino sherry and oolong tea.
  • Theater
  • Theater & Performance

Showstoppers! Spectacular Costumes From Stage and Screen is set to open August 5 and run through October 31. The unique attraction, displaying over 100 designs, will feature a 20,000-square-foot immersive set within the heart of Times Square at 234 West 42nd Street. The show aims to not only provide visitors with a behind-the-scenes stage and screen experience but also play a major role in New York’s ongoing revitalization. The large-scale offering will feature the original costumes from a number of Broadway hits, past and present, including Moulin Rouge!, The Lion King, Wicked, and Chicago. A few costumes from smash television shows and films will be in the mix, too, including pieces from Saturday Night Live and the upcoming James Bond film No Time to Die Showstoppers! will “pull back the curtain on the hundreds of costuming experts who create, supply and care for them, and infuse much-needed vitality back into the Theatre District,” organizers behind the exhibition wrote in a press release. All proceeds will raise money for the Costume Industry Coalition Recovery Fund, which first launched last year with a goal of raising over $20,000 for out-of-work members.

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Ms. Kim's, a new K-town karaoke lounge from Korean beauty entrepreneur Anna Kim, combines sophisticated style with sing-alongs. Envisioned during the pandemic, when we all just needed to belt out our frustrations, and spend some much-needed time outside of our homes with friends, Ms. Kim's offers both communal space and soundproof private karaoke rooms, so guests can customize their experience as it suits their needs. In the main lounge and bar, mixologist-approved cocktails take the place of the ubiquitous karaoke bar beer pitcher. Ingredients in the signature drinks, which start at $16, include butterfly pea flower, herbal infused syrups and top shelf spirits. Fine wine is sold by the glass or bottle, and beer is available on tap or by the bottle. For soju, the 46-proof Hwayo - 23° is available by the 375 mL bottle. Fridays will also bring live music to the bar, for those who prefer to sway to the sounds of jazz, rather than sing. To eat, Ms. Kim's offers a short menu of Japanese and Korean finger foods, like vegetable or shrimp tempura with four types of salt, three types of fried dumplings, and chicken karaage with garlic ginger soy sauce.  

  • Things to do
  • City Life

An NYC icon, Lamb Chop, is returning to her roots in NYC during the International Puppet Fringe Festival this month. The native New Yorker and former star of Lamb Chop’s Play Along will return to iconic Manhattan landmarks as she makes her way to the Museum of the City of New York’s exhibition "Puppets of New York," opening August 13 in partnership with the International Puppet Fringe Festival. More than 100 iconic puppets—including Punch and Judy, Oscar the Grouch, Lamb Chop and Lion King—will be on display to celebrate the history of puppetry in NYC. The exhibition is also part of Puppet Week NYC, featuring the International Puppet Fringe Festival, the world’s largest puppet event.

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  • Things to do
  • Flatiron

The Museum of Sex always has something exciting going on behind closed doors. "Super Funland: Journey into the Erotic Carnival" is back and better than ever with its 4-D immersive “Tunnel of Love” ride, the Love & Lust Deity Derby game, an erotic fortune-telling machine (modeled as RuPaul), a kissing booth, the Glory Stall game, an immersive "Stardust Lane - the Erogenous Kaleidoscope," an erotic mechanical bull and a lit-up climbing structure, "The Climbx," and more. Then when it's time to take the edge off, visitors can slide down a spiral slide into the Museum’s psychedelic carnival bar, Lollipop Lounge, for cocktails. 

Shake Rattle & Roll Dueling Pianos
  • Things to do

Every Saturday night at 8pm, two piano men battle it out to prove who is truly the master of all 88 keys, with a playlist decided entirely by the audience. Whether you’re in the mood for Billy Joel, Christina Aguilera or current chart toppers, these pianists are up for the challenge. But they expect you to do your part by singing along, but from home. Find tickets and request songs here: bit.ly/SRRshows 

Every Tuesday night at 7pm, play Name That Tune for a chance at $50 in cash and other prizes. There's a new theme each week. Tickets are at bit.ly/SRRshows

On Wednesday nights at 7pm, try your hand at Piano Bingo, an interactive, all-request event. Every song checks a box and every game has a winner! There's $100 in prizes every week. Get your game card at bit.ly/SRRshows. 

And starting July 31, it'll have an all-request rock n' roll party at the Cellar (July 31), the Cutting Room (Aug. 7 & 21) and Burgerology (Aug. 28).

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  • Things to do
  • Walks and tours
  • Flatiron

Get a whole new perspective on this neighborhood in a 90-minute journey that covers landmarks such as the MetLife Clock Tower, Appellate Courthouse and, of course, the Flatiron Building. Bring comfortable shoes and maybe an umbrella. Starts at 11am, rain or shine.

 

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Putting Green, an 18-hole course on a 15,000-square-foot tiered deck on the North Williamsburg riverfront has finally opened at the former Con Edison site that now belongs to developer Two Trees. The course aims to serve two purposes—one, to provide a fun time to New Yorkers, and two, to teach them about climate change, green and blue infrastructure, animal habitats, energy, and emissions. Each hole offers up a different scene—hole 1 is "Down the drain," showing how litter and debris get washed down storm drains and into waterways. Hole 2, "Whale Fall Feast," shows what happens when a whale dies and sinks to the bottom of the ocean. Hole 15, is "The Big Oyster" by you guessed it, the Billion Oyster Project. Other holes feature polar bears, a windmill, a cow, and a depiction of sea-level rise. The best part? All proceeds go toward organizations combating climate change.

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  • Art
  • Art

Start your engines for MoMA’s newest exhibition, AutomaniaAt first glance, cars might seem like mundane, carbon-emitting fixtures of contemporary life across much of the world. They’re woven into the fabric of American life — many towns and cities are nearly impossible to traverse without a vehicle. But as much as we take cars for granted, these marvels of machinery and human ingenuity emerged through some complicated socio-political and economic conditions. Featuring vintage cars from the earliest years of automobiles, Automania unpacks the complex relationship, and dependence, between us and cars. The two-part exhibition consists of galleries on view from July 4 through January 2, 2022, and a total of nine vintage cars dotting the museum’s first floor and Sculpture Garden until October 10. The exhibition pulls its name from a 1964 Oscar-nominated cartoon by the British animation team Halas and Batchelor (most famous for their adaptation of George Orwell’s Animal Farm).  In a press release, the MoMa pitches the ambitious show as examining “the car as a modern industrial product, transportation innovator, and style icon, as well as the generator of fatalities, traffic-choked environments, and ecological disaster in the oil age.” And, at the end of the day, the younger ones are sure to be impressed by all the cool cars.

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

The venue formerly known as Fat Cat has reemerged with a new name, new games, and custom ice cream. Cellar Dog (75 Christopher St.) is reviving the Fat Cat tradition of late-night basement gaming, with an updated concept for 2021. Opened by Backal Hospitality Group (BHG), Cellar Dog will remain a live music and game hall, making the most of the 9,000-square-foot underground space. Games include pool tables, ping pong, shuffleboard, foosball, checkers and chess, as well as antique and novelty arcade games including Pac Man and many more. Live jazz and additional entertainment will also be booked throughout the week.

 

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  • Things to do
  • Midtown West

Immersive art exhibit Arcadia Earth has reopened after being closed due to the pandemic, and it looks better than ever! The exhibit aims to inspire visitors artistically and ethically, as it uses 15 rooms to spotlight the environmental challenges that our planet is facing (such as overfishing, food waste, and climate change). This exhibit will not only leave visitors in awe, but it will help support Oceanic Global, an organization devoted to raising awareness around our aquatic ecosystems. In addition, a tree will also be planted for every ticket sold, making it a perfect gift for your eco-conscious friends!

  • Art
  • Art

SuperReal has reopened at Cipriani 25 Broadway, inside the historic Cunard Building, bringing its cutting-edge projection mapping tech and multimedia art to its walls and ceiling—and it happens to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Cunard Building, which opened in 1921. Created by multimedia entertainment company Moment Factory in partnership with hospitality brand Cipriani, SuperReal first opened in the summer of 2019. It aims to transport visitors through dreamlike scenes in its gorgeous hall. Across 45 minutes, the show places viewers in five unique and abstract sequences that are both stunning and interactive. One minute you could be daydreaming in a fairylike flower garden and the next you're caught in an epic thunderstorm or thrown into the middle of a tropical disco. During the show, people are encouraged to relax on bean bags or play with balloons that also react with the 360-degree show. The floor is a gigantic mirror that only enhances the special effects. It's the ultimate place for selfies and fun Instagram fodder.

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  • Things to do
  • Markets and fairs
  • Upper West Side

After a 15-month-long shutdown, this Upper West Side year-round bazaar is officially coming back on June 6. Although usually operating both indoors and outdoors, the market will, for now, only take over an open-air space on Sundays between 10am and 5:30pm. Grand Bazaar is one of NYC’s oldest and largest marketplaces, where you can buy vintage, antiques and more goodies from more than 100 local merchants, with photographers, jewelers and furniture designers selling their best. In addition, the weekly mainstay hosts a series of special events around the holidays, which we hope to be able to enjoy this year as well. 

 

  • Art
  • Painting
  • Harlem

This adults-only painting party experience in West Harlem and the Lower East Side is opening its outdoor spaces again! Pick up a paint brush with cocktail in hand (like the Picasso Punch or the Sistine Apple) and create your own masterpiece. If you're hungry, no worries, Paint 'N Pour also has small plates (shrimp po’boy sliders, orange bbq henny wings, cauliflower bites, bacon egg and cheese slidersfrench toast and chicken 'n waffle sliders). Tickets are $50 and include all art supplies and a 2-hour open bar. 

 

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  • Things to do
  • Lower East Side
Sour Mouse offers games like ping pong, pool and foosball, live music, comedy and art shows for the New Yorker looking for a fun night out. Check its Instagram for its weekly events, from ping pong speed dating to mixers with live music, and regular art openings. Starting this Thursday, Indie 184's work "Electromagnetic" will be showcased.

 

More things to do in NYC this weekend

  • Things to do

Fall in NYC is everything you could hope for in a season. First, the city gets delightfully spooky for Halloween. With thrilling Halloween events and Halloween festivals happening in every borough, it’s easy to get in the spirit of things! Aside from pumpkins and funky costumes though, you can keep the autumn excitement going by leaf peeping around the city, warming up with whiskey, parades, virtual parties and so much more. Autumn in NYC is tough to match!

  • Things to do

'Tis the season to get spooky! But beyond the best Halloween events, but there are also plenty of other awesome NYC events in October 2020. Use our events calendar to plan the quintessential month for leaf peeping and spotting fall foliage, pumpkin picking and more things to do in fall.

Kick off fall with some epic cultural events, you don't want to miss happening like Open House New York, Oktoberfest and new haunted pop-up drive throughs.

 

RECOMMENDED: Full NYC events calendar for 2020

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  • Things to do

Get ready ghouls and girls for an epic Halloween in NYC! The city is bursting with terrifying haunted houses, Halloween parties and more pumpkin-packed events. Whether you enjoy getting seriously spooked while watching the scariest horror films of all time or prefer to celebrate Halloween by leaf peeping while visiting some of the greatest fall getaways from NYC, we’ve got you covered.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best things to do in fall

The 50 best things to do in NYC for locals and tourists
  • Things to do

AUGUST 2020: New York City has gone through the proverbial fire and is now starting to come out the other side with our favorite museums, big attractions, and restaurants reopening after months of closure. While things are still a bit precarious, we're hoping these openings signal the light at the end of this long tunnel. We're eager to get back to the cultural institutions, shops, restaurants and iconic places that make New York City the best city in the world.

Check back as we will be updating this list more often than we did prior to lockdown to reflect New York City as it reopens.

Every day, our staffers are eating, drinking, partying, gigging and generally appreciating their way throughout this fair town of ours. Which makes pinning down the most essential New York activities kinda…tough. We need to include the classics, naturally—art museums in NYC, stellar New York attractions, killer bars and restaurants in NYC—but also spotlight the more recent or little-known gems that we truly love. Consider the below your NYC Bible. 

Done something on this list and loved it? Share it with the hashtag #TimeOutDoList.

You can also find out more about how Time Out selects the very best things to do all over the world, or take a look at our list of the 50 best things to do in the world right now.

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