Worldwide icon-chevron-right Asia icon-chevron-right Hong Kong icon-chevron-right The 13 best pizza restaurants in Hong Kong

The 13 best pizza restaurants in Hong Kong

Find the perfect slice at these top-tier pizzerias

Little Mario's
Little Mario's Little Mario's
By Time Out Hong Kong |
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Whether it’s a larger-than-life New York slice or a refined Neapolitan pie topped with San Marzano tomatoes and mozza, there’s something innately satisfying about a well-made pizza that’s fresh out the oven. It’s a good thing then that our city has upped its pizza game in recent years and now boasts pizzerias that rival those in Italy and America. Whether you like your crust thick or thin, your toppings simple or indulgent, you’re bound to find a slice here that satisfy your cravings. Don’t believe us? Here are the best places in town to placate your hunger pangs for pizza.

RECOMMENDED: Continue the carb fest at the best Italian restaurants in Hong Kong, or consider a detox with out list of the best vegetarian and vegan restaurants in Hong Kong.

The best pizzas in Hong Kong

Restaurants

208 Duecento Otto

Sheung Wan

This Hollywood Road spot has been serving up rustic Italian fare for years and has never lost its status as one of the best pizza joints in Hong Kong. The margherita is our favourite, made in traditional Neopolitan style in a custom-designed pizza oven shipped straight from Italy. The crust is light and crunchy and the base thin. The sauce is bursting with flavour and the buffalo mozzarella is the savoury icing on top.

Restaurants, Pizza

Alvy’s

Kennedy Town

A cosy neighbourhood joint perfect for Kennedy Town, Alvy’s serves up good pizza and good drinks in equal measure.  The venue is perfectly reminiscent of a casual New York neighbourhood bar – another success by designer Paul Gelinas, who nailed the neighbourhood gastropub vibes at May Chow’s Second Draft in Tai Hang. First up for food, we order a trio of schmears. Our order – which includes mortadella spuma with five spices, smoked eggplant with chilli oil, and caper créme with lox and salmon roe – comes with a side of lightly toasted sourdough. Each schmear was equally delicious: the mortadella was pâté-like and well seasoned; the eggplant schmear was like a fiery babaganoush; and the latter was reminiscent of a classic NYC bagel filling. Looking to see how Alvy’s makes use of local flavours in its pizzas, I opted for the Bak Gwei, that’s topped with gruyere béchamel, mozzarella and char siu. The sourdough base was chewy and satisfying, robust enough to hold a mighty load of cheese. The cha siu was tops too, the only issue being that the chunks of pork were small, meaning the sweetness gets drowned out by the cheese. Still, a good slice can be hard to come by in this city and Alvy’s serves one of the better pizzas. It’s not all about the food, though. The drinks menu is impressive, with a large selection of Young Master craft beers, rarer imported brews, cocktails, natural wines and Hong Kong's’s most extensive collection of American only craft whiskeys. We selected the C

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Restaurants, Italian

Amalfitana

Repulse Bay

The Roopchand and Chellaram brothers, the men behind popular drinking spot Rummin’ Tings, have come together to bring Repulse Bay a slice of the Amalfi coast. More precisely, slices of quality Napolitano-style pizza in a relaxed setting.  Amalfitana is small and has a distinct sense of place with its Amalfi Coast-inspired mural and turquoise tiled pizza oven. The menu is small, too, and simple. A handful of starters, the artisanal pizzas the restaurant prides itself on and a few traditional Italian desserts. We start with the aubergine parmigana ($90), an Italian classic consisting of cooked aubergine layered with mozzarella, tomato puree and plenty of Parmesan cheese. The success of this dish lies in the use of quality ingredients and with one mouthful it’s clear this place isn’t cutting corners. The Parmesan and mozzarella combine well with the stacked veg and the fresh tomato puree cuts the cheese perfectly. Some words of warning though – this is a big portion and could definitely be eaten as a main. In fact, we order this and two pizzas and end up cancelling the second pizza due to the need to loosen our belts.  Next, we opt for the signature Amalfitana pizza ($250), which is topped with porcini mushrooms, bufala mozzarella, Parma ham and rocket. The crust is thin, well charred and piled with just the right amount of delicious toppings. Our only quibble is that the pizza isn’t pre-cut, which means fussing about ourselves.  We finish off with a tiramisu ($80) and this c

Restaurants, Italian

Ciao Chow – Italian Cafeteria

Lan Kwai Fong

Another new restaurant has opened up in California Tower and, like the rest, it’s pricy and nothing to rave about. However, despite the lack of razzle-dazzle, Ciao Chow nevertheless serves up some tasty and comprehensive Italian standards in a massive pizza and pasta joint at LKF street level. Now isn’t that exactly what pre and post-partiers need to soak up all that liquor? This space is a welcoming one, with open entrances that allow onlookers to gaze into the vast, modern dining room, which is decorated with industrial fixtures, marble tables and a well-stocked bar. The high ceilings really open up the restaurant and create an amiable social atmosphere. Again – nothing to rave about, but this spot works well for the LKF crowds. We start our dinner with a few light appetisers – a timid serving of Tuscan salami ($38) and a delectable fresh kale salad with crumbles ($118). The salami is strong, rich and tasty but, sadly, you only get a pathetic amount of thin slices on your plate, which is disappointing. The kale salad, however, is much better. It’s refreshing, full of fresh leafy bite and features a delicious savoury and tangy dressing. We wish the kale salad at spots like Mana or Nood Food tasted as good as this.  Next up are the carbs. We order the spaghetti vongole ($168). There’s nothing new here, though. The noodles may be cooked to al dente perfection and the sauce may be exquisitely rich, but the clams could be better in both quality and juiciness. And our second c

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Dough Bros
Dough Bros
Restaurants, Pizza

Dough Bros

Happy Valley

Located not far off the Happy Valley Racecourse, Dough Bros may be a tiny take-out pizza shop with just a few stools, but their artisanal sourdough pizza and freshly-filled doughnuts (heads up, nutella fanatics!) are certainly worth the wait. Not to mention the wide selection of local/imported beers and wines that are sure to quench your thirst as the chef hand-rolls your pizza on the spot.

Kytaly
© TseChiChung
Restaurants, Pizza

Kytaly

Central

Regarded as one of the greatest pizza-masters in the industry right now, Franco Pepe brings his Geneva-based brand to Soho for the very first time. In a terraced, open-kitchen space on Wyndham Street, Kytaly offers more than a dozen different pizzas, as well as Italian salads and desserts. Another reason to visit? The venue boasts the city’s first Campari bar, meaning that it does a mean negroni.

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Restaurants, Pizza

Little Mario's

Kwun Tong

Tucked away in an industrial building in Kwun Tong, Little Mario's is one of the unlikeliest of places in town to score a great slice (it also operates a branch on Park Island). And yet it delivers – literally and figuratively – some of the best pizzas we've had in the city. The dough here is always made fresh using top-shelf ingredients and is baked until it crisps up around the edges while retaining a satisfying chew. The classic pepperoni is the way to go here, although the there are also some more creative offerings, including the chicken tikka and all-day breakfast pizza. Little Mario's offers pastas and salads too but we say stick to the pizzas.

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Restaurants

Motorino

Soho

Highly anticipated new eateries pop up in Central like daffodils in the springtime. However, when we first heard Motorino was setting up shop in the district, we expected it to be best in show this season. After all, it brings one awesome reputation with it, being one of New York’s most popular pizzeria chains. And this is its first Asian outing to boot. The Motorino restaurants in New York focus on chef Mathieu Palombino’s signature Neopolitan-style pizzas, which are comprised of fresh, seasonal ingredients. These pies are hugely popular in the Big Apple and they’ve even been coined ‘the city’s best pizzas’ by New York Times restaurant critic Sam Sifton. High praise indeed. So our new Motorino has had big shoes to fill. On Soho’s busy, hilly Shelley Street, Motorino is decked out with green-striped walls and a silver ceiling. The eye-catching restaurant shouts home comforts and makes good use of its space. We especially adore a corner area which has been made out to look like it’s in a romantic back alley, lined with small tables for parties of two to four. We start the evening off with meatballs ($138) and a beet salad ($178). The appetisers are gorgeous to look at – a medley of colours and shapes. And, on first taste, it becomes apparent that Motorino does meat extremely well. The balls, for example, are gently packed, taste superb and are excellently seasoned. They’re braised in a thick and fresh tomato sauce, and, thankfully, that dried breadcr

Restaurants, Pizza

Mother of Pizzas

Causeway Bay

Mother of Pizzas takes the very best of the New York and Neapolitan traditions and bakes them into a single pie. Crispy and chewy, the hand-stretched crusts here are delicately charred in places and painted with a house-blended sauce made with San Marzano tomatoes. The slices are American-sized, designed to be folded up and eaten with a cavalcade of toppings, from the Pepperoni L'Americano (mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, pepperoni) to the more adventurous Hawaiian Coco featuring fresh pineapple and shredded coconut.

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Restaurants

Pizzeria Jacomax

Sheung Wan

One of Hong Kong’s newest additions to the pizza scene, Pizzeria Jacomax has already been garnering a loyal following. On a recent Friday night, the tiny hole-in-the wall restaurant – just the kind of place you’d expect to come across walking the streets of Italy – was packed with patrons happily enjoying their delicious Neapolitan-style pizzas. Jacomax is the condensed version of the owner’s name, Jacobo Maximiliano, an Italian who ended up in Hong Kong after falling in love with (and marrying) a Hong Kong native who now co-manages the pizzeria. The resident pizza chef hails from Puglia and watching him effortlessly turn out beautiful, delicious pizzas one after another is a fun way to pass the time while waiting for your own slice to be made to order. Starters include an antipasti plate piled with a selection of Italian salami, hams and cheeses, served with freshly baked bread ($125), as well as a selection of fresh salads dressed simply with olive oil and vinegar ($42-$52). All of the appetisers are generously sized and can be shared. As expected, the pizzas are the main draw and at Jacomax there are 19 variations on offer, as well as the option to create your own. Pizzas are available in 32cm and 52cm sizes, aptly labelled ‘regular’ and ‘very big’. The crudo pizza ($130 regular; $220 very big), generously topped with paper-thin slices of parma ham, rocket and shavings of parmigiano reggiano is an especially delicious and popular choice. The Napoli ($95 regular; $160 ve

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Now to work off all that dough

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