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Ice Theatre of New York
Photograph: Mariamma Kambon

The best things to do in NYC this week

The best things to do in NYC this week include Restaurant Week, cozy winter pop-ups, comedy shows and more

Shaye Weaver
Written by
Shaye Weaver
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If you're looking for the best things to do in NYC this week, or even for today, there are tons of fun options. Check out Dante's Winter House pop-up in the Seaport, get on those ice bumper cars at Bryant Park and head out to eat for Restaurant Week! For more ideas, scroll down to see this week's best things to do in NYC.

Make sure to check respective venues before you head out to make sure they're open.

RECOMMENDED: Full list of the best things to do in New York

Best things to do in NYC this week

  • Restaurants

New York City Restaurant Week is among the five boroughs’ best food holidays. Traditionally, New Yorkers (and a few lucky tourists) clear their dining schedules and make reservations at the city’s best special occasion spots, newcomers and all-time favorite restaurants for deals unseen the rest of the year. Hundreds of destinations participate citywide, including—for the first time ever—a food hall! Here's the lowdown on the deals you can get at Time Out Market New York...

Enjoy a wine tasting and special after-hours talk from the Brooklyn Museum on Thursday (at 6 and 8pm) that'll cover how contemporary designers build on the innovations of Modern Gothic furniture design. You'll sip from a range of wines inspired by the era of Kimbel and Cabus selected by Marquis Williams of Highly Recommended, a Brooklyn-based members-only wine club. Brooklyn incubator Lichen and Chicago-based Norman Teague Design Studio will talk about their artistic communities and the ongoing legacy of Kimbel and Cabus. After the tastings and presentations, visit the galleries for an exclusive after-hours viewing of "Modern Gothic: The Inventive Furniture of Kimbel and Cabus, 1863–82." Tickets are $45 and include four wine tastings, small bites and admission to the exhibit.

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  • Things to do
  • Lenox Hill

The Grolier Club, a private Upper East Side club and society for book lovers, is opening its doors to the public for what is the first comprehensive Sherlock Holmes exhibition in New York City in more than half a century. Between now and April 16, "Sherlock Holmes in 221 Objects," will feature "an unrivaled number" of Sir Conan Doyle's belongings, including four short story manuscripts, a wealth of holograph letters from Doyle to friends, colleagues, and well-wishers, an idea book of his private musings, including a calendar note where he wrote "killed Holmes" on, as well as a never-before-displayed handwritten speech detailing his explanation for killing off Holmes.

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  • Art
  • Midtown East

The Pop Art Festival, kicking off on the birthday of artist Jeff Koons, will feature key works by Warhol, Basquiat, Wesselmann, Mr. Brainwash and Devon at the Carlton Fine Arts Ltd. location at 543 Madison Avenue. Across three floors, see for yourself some of the most iconic and notable works from the key pop artists including Jeff Koons’ "Monkey Train" from 2007 and his "Orange Balloon Dog" as well as Mr. Brainwash’s "Chaplin Love" from 2010 and "Marilyn Red" from 2016, Andy Warhol’s "Howdy Doody" from 1981, Devon’s "Audrey Chanel" from 2019, Tom Wesselmann "Big Blonde" from 1988 and Jean-Michel Basquiat’s "Boxer Rebellion" from 1982. All works are available for purchase.

  • Art
  • Prospect Park

After ending abruptly in 2020, Plant Cure/Brooklyn Botanic Garden has reopened with the work of five visual artists in residence—Desirée Alvarez, Agnes Murray, Maddy Rosenberg, Amanda Thackray, and James Walsh. In February 2019, the artists began researching the collections of the library and had full rein of the gardens for six months to help them come up with their individual takes on the subject of medicinal plants. Brooklyn Botanic Garden has its own history as a place of healing. You can see their works now through March 27.

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

There's a lot to say about new Lower East Side cocktail bar Sally Can Wait—starting with the story behind the name, which is an ode to co-owner Matt Friedlander's dog, Sally. Sally Can Wait seeks to marry the culinary worlds of Latin and Jewish cuisines—a task that's rarely been attempted before. The food offerings immediately call out to both fares. Take the grilled mahi mahi Reuben, for example, which is a Cuban version of the classic Jewish sandwich (pastrami spice, sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, house Russian dressing). The classic Cubano is also worth splitting (roast pork, ham, Swiss cheese, house pickles, yellow mustard) after an order of the oh-so-Jewish latkes, served with sour cream, pickled onion and Fuji apple compote. The cocktails are outstanding as well—which doesn't surprise us considering that Friedlander used to be the general manager at Grand Banks, and co-owner Zak Snyder was the bar manager at Analogue. The two worked at a slew of other New York City nightlife staples as well.

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Looking for a date night idea? Color Factory, the museum that aims to expand your boundaries of perception through the use of color, is hosting a Date Night event on Thursday from 4-8pm. Visitors will be able to purchase two tickets for the price of one online or at either location, where couples can explore their connection through art! To access the deal, use code DATENIGHTS22 when purchasing tickets.

Virtual Marvel by Design Panel
Photograph: Shutterstock

10. Virtual Marvel by Design Panel

Learn how comic book culture and its influence on every creative field, including graphic design, movies and visual culture with Liz Stinson, the editor of Marvel by Design, and panelists including some of Marvel’s most renowned artists and graphic designers including Cooper Union School of Art and alumnus Dean Mike Essl A’96, Chris Eliopoulos and Paul Sahre. It begins at 6:30pm. Registration is required for this free public program.

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

The downtown spot will be serving full-sized cocktails for a quarter of a dollar during its lunch service every weekday through January 31. See you there? As enticing as cheap-but-delicious-tasting martinis and manhattans are, Anton's is always worth a visit. The cozy café feels like a New York throwback dishing out hearty plates the likes of an arctic char served with fennel salad, olives and tomato confit, a whole lot of different pastas and the kinds of desserts that pair oh-so-well with a perfectly concocted cocktail. (Case in point: the warm apple crisp a la mode and the Mexican wedding cookies.)

 

12. Drunk Planet Earth

Looking for a free comedy show? Drunk Planet Earth, a monthly show held in the backroom of Easy Lover at 790 Metropolitan Avenue, is Mystery Science Theater 3000 but instead of sci-fi films, it's animal documentaries with drinking rules thrown in. Hosted by two comedians, Brian Morabito (Comedy Central) and Stephen Buckley (UCB), the show revolves around watching a nature documentary, drinking and the audience trying to stump the hosts with animal questions. Each time the hosts get a question wrong, they take a shot. It's free and the next show is on Wednesday, January 26th at 7pm.

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  • Art
  • Art

If you pass by Madison Square Park you'll notice about 100 wooden elementary school-style desks sprouting tree branches—a somewhat eerie scene.

It's part of Artist Hugh Hayden's new installation called "Brier Patch" and is spread out over four lawns in the park. On view through April 24, the commission hopes to bring to mind the disparities within the education system and the idea of the American Dream while also calling on folklore with tangled branches emerging from the desks.

RECOMMENDED: You can now walk through a glowing tunnel in midtown

The largest group of desks (48 of them) is arranged in a grid on the Oval Lawn while another smaller grid sits on Sparrow Lawn across from the playground in the Northeast corner of the park. Two desks sit on Elm Lawn. Finally, another group can be found on the Veteran’s Lawn without branches, allowing for the public to interact with the installation and sit in the desks.

According to the Madison Square Park Conservancy, the grid of desks reminds viewers of the typical classroom setting or even darkly, the tombstones in a military cemetery. 

"In Hayden’s installation, each desk, like a tombstone, can be seen as a stand-in for an individual," the Conservancy explains. The wild branches disrupt the formation helping to signify intellectual development and how some excel and others get left behind...where only a few can truly thrive. It also alludes to student loan debt taken on by getting a higher education. 

Brier Patch Madison Square Garden
Photograph: Yasunori Matsui, courtesy the artist and Madison Square Park Conservancy

"In Hugh Hayden’s project, the overgrown configuration of branches overwhelms and encumbers the placidity of seats of childhood learning," said Brooke Kamin Rapaport, the deputy director and Martin Friedman Chief Curator of Madison Square Park Conservancy. "Hayden imbues each of his works with intense meaning that, when peeled back, reveals lived experiences about rooted systems in our country and the world. He transforms everyday objects into new forms that expose the properties and purpose of the original source. Brier Patch is both visually powerful and loaded with inherent tensions-growth and stagnation, seduction and peril, individual and community-that ask us to consider how these dichotomies coexist in engrained systems and the work on view." 

The twisted branches and the name "Brier Patch" are meant to evoke an environment that is difficult to inhabit as well as the brier patch tales found in folklore traditions around the world, including Joel Chandler Harris’ Uncle Remus" stories, which are now condemned for their fictitious depictions of Southern plantation life.

"Brier Patch" is open now at Madison Square Park through April 24.

Brier Patch Madison Square Garden
Photograph: Rashmi Gill, courtesy the artist and Madison Square Park Conservancy

 

  • Bars

Whether it’s because it so often intersects with golden hour, or simply because the drinks are cheap(er), happy hour is the best hour in NYC. The discounted beer, wine and cocktails are terrific, but it’s even nicer to have less-spendy snacks to match. A lot of the best bars in town offer deals between about lunch and dinner, and these outstanding few slash their food prices to $10 or less for those precious minutes, too. 

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  • Art
  • Greenpoint

For the first time ever, a Lenape-curated exhibition featuring artifacts and masterworks from the native people of the New York Harbor region is opening in NYC. The Brooklyn Public Library and The Lenape Center are presenting "Lenapehoking," the Lenape name for the homeland, an exhibition of masterworks by Lenape artists past and present. Here, visitors will see never-before-seen beaded bandolier bags from the 1800s, a newly created turkey feather cape, three tapestries made of Purple Kingsessing for a rematriation project in the Hudson Valley. This exhibit wouldn't be what it is without its curator, Joe Baker, who is a member of the Delaware Tribe of Indians and the co-founder and executive director of the Lenape Center. He will lead a virtual exhibit opening on January 20 at 7pm. You can RSVP here.

In these classes, you will lie back on a comfy futon and make yourself comfortable, put an eye mask on to block out the peripheral light, and gradually open yourself up to the healing vibrations. The beauty of sound baths is that they bypass the intellect and give your mind a rest. When you follow the sounds of the singing bowls until you can’t hear them anymore, this process takes you into a profound state of relaxation. Each sound bath is limited to 10 people and will take place on Sundays (1/23, 1/30, 2/6, 2/13, 2/20: 4-4:45 pm for $35 and 5-6pm for $40) and Mondays (1/24, 1/31, 2/7, 2/14, 2/21: 6-6:45pm for $35 and 7-8pm for $40)

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  • Art
  • Midtown West

There's a new art exhibit in the sky at the Top of the Rock!

"BUILDINGS AND BLOCKS" is a new interactive art "experience" inspired by the skyline and the city's many shapes you can view from the observation deck, including three 23-foot towers and 37 black and white-striped pieces resembling children’s building blocks.

Artists Kris Moran and Martin Duffy aim to transport visitors back to childhood inside the Weather Room on the 67th floor with playful towers of large-scale, black and white striped, toy building blocks that emulate the skyline seen through the 25-foot floor to ceiling windows surrounding the room. Visitors are invited to sit or interact with the freestanding blocks while taking in the breathtaking skyline views of Manhattan.

This exhibit is free to all Top of the Rock ticket holders.

While you're there, grab a drink at Rock Center's Other Half outdoor biergarten around the corner on the South Plaza or warm up at its Après Skate Chalets.

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

A new sultry speakeasy awaits you behind a vibrant mural on West 38th Street. To find Sei Less, the speakeasy opening on Saturday night, look for a colorful painting of a woman making the hush sign (with a finger to her lips) and go through an otherwise nondescript door. Once inside, you'll find the Pan-Asian bar, lounge and restaurant with gorgeous nods to traditional Asian art and carved Asian design elements such as the architectural pagodas of generations’ past. The Asian-inspiration continues through to the flavors in its cocktail menu featuring a Lychee Martini, the Pick Me Up Martini, Yuzu Margarita, and an Elderflower Mojito as well as mocktails for those who are sober.

 

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A new rink has opened in Brooklyn that offers lessons for all skill levels! The Rink at Brooklyn Commons is now open daily with "upscale ice skating programs for men, women, and children," including private lessons, semi-private lessons and birthday parties. Ice time will be held in timed increments of 90 minutes or two hours and you just need to register and purchase your tickets in advance. (Walk-ups are welcome but only if space is available). Everyone must sign this waiver before their skating. To book private lessons or group skating, email metrotechrink@upsilonentertainmentgroup.com.

 
  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Sands of Persia, a new dessert bar and hookah lounge, is serving up Turkish sand coffee. Traditionally, Turkish java is brewed in a pan filled with sand and heated over an open flame. The fine coffee grinds and water are then added to a small long-handled pot called cezce, traditionally made of brass, copper, silver or gold (most recently, also made with aluminum, ceramics or stainless steel) and boasting a specially designed pouring lip. The concoction is then mixed and placed in hot sand, which creates and even heat and helps the coffee foam almost immediately.  The sweets menu also includes a Fingerlime Chiffon Meringue (fingerlime yuzu cake, meringue, rosemary, orange mousse and lime gel), the Persimmon Wide (persimmon tuile with almond crumble, truffle oil, yogurt, butternut squash, creme brûlée and balsamic vinegar honey gel), the Desert Sunset (banana pudding with parle sugar jaggery) and the All is Well (brownie with soft serve), among other dishes.

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

One of the most fun things to do at the annual Bryant Park Winter Village is to ride those bumper cars on ice and, as of this Friday, the slick autos will be back for you to play around with. Woohoo! Available between 2pm and 8pm on weekdays and 11am to 5pm on weekends, the cars will be in the park through Sunday, February 27—so you've got a little over a month to have some fun on the ice. New this year, the Bank of America Winter Village announced that it will also host special late-night rides—but no specifics on that just yet.

 

  • Nightlife
  • Cabaret and burlesque
  • Chelsea

This immersive nightlife experience blends an old-world vaudeville club with New York's underground queer circus scene with NYC's most sought-after nightclub acts from America’s Got Talent, Broadway, Cirque Du Soleil, The Box, House of Yes, Company XIV and more.

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  • Things to do
  • Chelsea

Nationally-recognized comedy show, UpDating, is finally returning to the stage after a long year away. Deal with your dating hang-ups front and center at this live romantic experiment. Two New Yorkers will be paired on-stage for a blind date, and you get to join in on the magic (or the meltdown). The show comes from NY-Based Comedian Brandon Berman and Dating Blogger Harrison Forman. For more details you can check out UpDating's Instagram @updatingshow.

  • Things to do
  • City Life

The winter of the heated dome continues strong: Somewhere Nowhere, the rooftop lounge and nightclub atop the Renaissance New York Chelsea Hotel on West 25th Street just debuted eight unique teardrop igloos that folks can rent all season long. Each cupola can fit between four and six guests and features a cozy built-in fireplace, unobstructed views of the Empire State Building plus winter-inspired decorative accents and blankets to keep warm. Fair warning: You can only reserve an igloo for two-hour increments and it's $200 per person.

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Join Andre Medrano and Maggie Maxwell present in a night of the wildest "Would-You-Rather" scenarios imaginable—Have a case of the Mondays at TGIFridays or celebrate hump day at Ruby Tuesdays? Be a one-hit-wonder or a two-hits-and quits? Have a cat with the will to win or a dog with a need for speed? WYR features comedians from Comedy Central, SNL, Netflix, Hulu, HBO, ABC, CBS, NBC, The New Yorker, comedy festivals around the country, and more. This event will feature Molly Brenner, Jake Cornell, Ophira Eisenberg, Monique Moses and Anna Roisman. Head out on Thursday to the 8pm show at Friends and Lovers (641 Classon Ave., Brooklyn). Tickets are $5. There's no drink minimum.

  • Bars
  • Financial District

The best bar in North America (2019 & 2020), Dante, is transforming The Seaport's Pearl Alley into a winter wonderland with an Aperitivo hour, seasonal cocktails and live entertainment within a warm and inviting waterfront setting all gussied up with seasonal decor, greenery and string lights. The pop-up has three separate bars—a coffee bar with pastries, espresso and coffee cocktails—and two food trucks—one serving flatbreads and one centered around affogatos. The third bar is an exclusive Negroni Bar featuring a selection of Dante’s award-winning Negronis that you can sit down at and enjoy one or two of its Negroni variations, including the Chocolate Negroni, Caffe Negroni, Negroni Bianco and more, plus a couple of small bites to snack on. Better yet, you can enjoy your drinks in The Alley, a casual space with a game hall featuring foosball and other activities, and every Thursday through Sunday night starting at 5:30-11pm, the space will have live music from a variety of musicians, from Cuban bands to New Orleans Jazz quartets to DJs and more.

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  • Art
  • Gramercy

Get a glimpse inside New York photographer and director Jerry Schatzberg's studio from the 1960s, where he shot some extraordinary portraits of icons such as Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Aretha Franklin, Sharon Tate, Catherine Deneuve and Carmen De Lavallade. The studio was set up in 1957 a few steps from Fotografiska at 333 Park Avenue South and became the setting for Schatzberg's playful portraiture that "betray his unquenchable, almost maniacal search for glamour, for glimmers that elevate the geniuses of his time out of their accomplishments and into a pictorially extraordinary ordinary."

 

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

If you're looking for a cute (and warm!) dining destination now that the weather has officially turned cold and the first snow hit the city, consider reserving one of the cozy yurts that have been set up outside of Fairfax, the all-day cafe and bar in Greenwich Village. Although the fabulous tents aren't anything new, it is the first year that the eatery has decided to operate them on its own (in the past, they've been part of an experiential partnership with American Express).  There are three total yurts on premise and reservations for groups of up to four are available right here (just make sure to select the "yurt dining" option). The best part: diners can order from the spot's a la carte menu, not having to worry about meeting a minimum or indulging in a prix-fixe offering. Fairfax's sister restaurant, Jolene in NoHo, is also currently operating four heated yurts that you can reserve.

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  • Art
  • Midtown West

Award-winning graphic novelist Peter Kuper's intricate drawings of insects—bees, ants, cicadas, butterflies, silkworms, beetles, dragonflies, and more—show them "flying, crawling, and interacting with the various rooms of the Library’s 42nd Street building, where they will be showcased. "This bug’s-eye view of the building’s Beaux-Arts architectural details illuminates the iconic spaces in a completely original way." Kuper has been working on an upcoming graphic novel, INterSECTS, and had the chance to explore the building and its rooms while they were empty during the pandemic. It was there that he realized that the building would be a perfect vehicle for his concept. Viewers of his work can access commentary by experts online and via QR codes, such as Jessica Ware on dragonflies, Gene Kritsky on cicadas, Michael Engel on bees, Barrett Klein on scarab beetles, and Mark W. Moffett on ants with Mexico’s leading poet/novelist, Homero Aridjis, reading his poem "A Una Mariposa Monarcha."  The audio talks are accompanied by the insect-inspired music of David Rothenberg. All of this plus downloadable coloring book art will be available on January 7 at nypl.org/intersects.

  • Things to do
  • Greenpoint

Ice skate on the 23rd-floor rooftop of The William Vale this winter season at Vale Rink.  In its third season, the rink provides an incredible view of the Manhattan skyline and a smooth experience. Made with Glice's sustainable synthetic ice that doesn't require water, it'll be available on more balmy days and it's debatably better for rookie ice skaters, too. 

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

Governors Island, which recently announced that it will be open to the public year-round for the first time in its history, has opened its first-ever winter village with glittering lights, a 5,000-square-foot ice rink, sled rentals, warm drinks near fire pits and winter programming as well. The massive ice rink will be open Fridays, weekends and on New York City public school holidays from noon to 5pm and Saturdays and Sundays from 10am to 5pm, with extended hours available for youth, adult and nonprofit sports leagues and associations. There will be themed events as well as Free Admission Fridays!

  • Things to do
  • Rockaways

This winter, you can go to the beach and a winter oasis at The Rockaway Hotel + Spa. At its Winter Pool House Experience, you can sit in one of three new cedar, barrel saunas that encircle the hotel's outdoor pool before or after taking a refreshing dip or getting cozy in its lounge space that's outfitted in teak furniture and sherpa throws for just $25 per person for a day pass. While you're there, themed food and cocktails will be on tap, plus day pass holders will get 10% off at Margie’s and The Rooftop as well as access to the entire Winter Pool House, towels and robes.

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  • Bars
  • Harlem

Every Monday evening, you can enjoy Prohibition-era cocktails and live jazz channeling the spirit and energy of the Harlem Renaissance at Sugar Monk. You'll have your pick of Prohibition and Pre-Prohibition cocktails (Sidecar, Clover Club, Bijou, French 75, The Boothby, The Bee's Knees, Hanky Panky and others) to sip on while Max Bessesen and his trio play on from 8 to 10pm. There's no cover, just make a reservation on Resy.

  • Comedy
  • Lower East Side

Sesh Comedy is the only BYOB comedy club in NYC and features comics from Comedy Central, HBO, Colbert, Netflix, Amazon, and others. It's "Comedy Cellar if the Comedy Cellar was $10 and when you arrived they handed you a free drink!" That's right, you get a free alcoholic drink with your ticket (if you're 21 or older). BYOB is also encouraged.

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  • Things to do
  • Hell's Kitchen

On Location Tours is once again offering its popular On Location Tours Sex and the City Hotspots Tour as both a public and private sightseeing experience. This bus tour highlights several famous NYC buildings and locations featured in the series Sex and the City, all from the comfort of a heated bus this winter.

On the tour, you'll see Greenwich Village, the Meatpacking District, and SoHo and its one-of-a-kind boutiques, department stores and designer shops with tour guides who are local New York City actresses excited to share facts along with fun trivia questions about the buildings and locations.

Each tour guest will also receive a free Magnolia Bakery cupcake (and those over 21 can sip discounted cosmos at the famous NYC bar ONieal’s). 

Public tours run several times a week, including Fridays and Saturdays at 3pm. Private tours are offered daily, and a limo buyout option is available.

  • Things to do
  • Financial District

If you want some magic with your cuppa, head to The Cauldron. It's launching an interactive "Wizard Afternoon Tea" experience inside its venue at 47 Stone Street, starting December 17.  Why have a conventional, boring three-tier cake stand full of finger sandwiches when you could be presented with a multi-layered, magic wand-interactive colorful castle, activated by a touch-sensitive magic mushroom and topped with a glowing dragon egg? That's right—it's completely fantastical. The table is littered with extra-large tea timers and flowery, mismatched teacups that you would expect to see in any respectable witch's tea cupboard. Nosh on "Elven Scones" wrapped in banana leaves with jam and clotted cream, colorful macarons oozing with mini pipettes of raspberry sauce and a melange of "sand-witches" and more.

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

The trend of heated domes taking over our city this winter continues at the A.R.T. NoMad (which stands for Arlo Roof Top, just in case you didn't know). Although they will start taking reservations later this week, the rooftop igloos will officially be up and running New Year's Eve and will continue to operate through the winter at the stylish midtown hotel on East 31st street. Reservations can be made right here for Thursdays through Saturdays at 5pm through 1am and each cupola will host up to 10 guests at once.

  • Art
  • Chelsea

Fashion lovers need to stop by the Museum at FIT for this exhibition exploring approximately 200 years of women’s dress from 1800 to the early 21st century through the lens of accessories. Through dozens of pairs of shoes, bags, scarves, fans and even sunglasses, viewers get to see how these accessories have "helped women create a sense of who they were, with important consequences for how they experienced gender, class, and race," according to Public historian Ariel Beaujot.

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  • Art
  • Art

Now through mid-January 2022, you'll have ten additional reasons to visit the Meatpacking District as a series of new interesting light installations have taken over the neighborhood. From enormous, lit-up snowmen to colorful, abstract neon lights and planters filled with glowing dandelions, the "Lights on the Cobbles" installations are found all along Ninth Avenue between 14th Street and Gansevoort Street. Visitors will notice that the outdoor exhibits culminate at Gansevoort Plaza, where a colonnade is draped in freeform neon lights that bounce shapes off the reflective plexi tunnel surrounding a semicircle seating area. It's basically the ideal Instagram setup both in terms of location and lighting.

  • Things to do
  • Upper West Side

An immersive new exhibit takes visitors "underwater" to meet some of the ocean's diverse shark species, including the biggest predatory fish of all time—the megalodon. "Sharks" at AMNH, which opens December 15, introduces the "toothy, fearsome predators" that have captured the public's imagination through films like Jaws and Deep Blue Sea and dives deep into the incredible diversity of this ancient group of fishes through dozens of life-size models (some as long as 33 feet) in an ocean-like gallery with wave-like lighting that moves across the floor. Once visitors enter the gallery, a 27-foot-long megalodon, dubbed the "Tyrannosaurus rex of the seas," model greets them with its mouth wide open as if it is about to feed on them. Here, its giant teeth and overall size set the tone for the super cool and interactive exhibit.

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  • Art
  • Midtown West

The magic and splendor of Walt Disney Animation Studios, from the opulence of Beauty and the Beast to the stylized forests of Sleeping Beauty, have their very own exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art for the first time. The new exhibit, called Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts, is sure to capture the imagination of Disney fans young and old through the display of 18th century tapestries, furniture, Boulle clocks, Sèvres porcelain and other decorative art from Europe set in context with 150 production artworks and works on paper from Disney.  Disney fans who enter the exhibition, which officially opens Friday, December 10, will be wowed by the storybook-inspired architecture of the space but also the presence of some actual artifacts from the movies, including the ornate storybook for Sleeping Beauty and the actual story sketches from CinderellaNext to these items are the things that inspired them, from a 1500s tapestry from the Met Cloisters that directly influenced an artist on Sleeping Beauty to actual Rococo furniture and decorative items that inspired the characters in Beauty and the Beast.

  • Theater
  • Circuses & magic
  • Upper West Side

After declaring bankruptcy in 2016 to widespread lamentations, the family-friendly circus came bouncing back to life at Lincoln Center a year later, and now returns for its 43nd season with an all-new show. Ringmaster and acrobat Alan Silva (America's Got Talent) presides over a spectacle that includes aerialist Nik Wallenda and his famous circus kin as well as comic daredevil Johnny Rockett, dachshund wrangler Diana Vedyashkina and an international cast of astonishing speciality artists. Philip Wm. McKinley, who presided over the post–Julie Taymor version of Broadway's Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, serves as director and choreographer. (Schedules vary from week to week so be sure to check the curtain time.)

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Spicy Medley brings together comedy, music and a little bit of spice. Our show provides an array of New York talent to community members in a high energy, and welcoming show. Audience members can expect big laughs, and "maybe even a big cry cause it’s just so dang SPICY!" Hosted by Tess Tregellas (Funny or Die, Amazon Prime) and  Sara Bergmark (The Stand, Broadway Comedy Club), you'll hear from Mic Nguyen (Esquire, Asian Not Asian Podcast), JC Mendoza (Funny or Die), Caitlin Peluffo (Late Show with Stephen Colbert) and Ian & Dan ( Cafe Wha?). Tickets are $10.

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

The Moxy Times Square hotel’s rooftop is open year-round for drinks, food and NYC skyline views, but its 10,000-square-foot space might look a little different depending on when you visit. Magic Hour, on the hotel’s 18th floor, gets a timely refresh each season with new, Instagrammable installations. Starting Friday, November 19, Magic Hour’s Pink Rose Garden will become The Pink Winter Lodge–replete with après-ski-themes but sans the pesky powder.  Magic Hour’s wintery cocktails include the tequila-based Double Pink Diamond and the especially apt Après Ski, with vodka, white chocolate liqueur, soy milk and mini marshmallows. Seasonal sweets like glitter-dusted ‘Pink Bling’ donut rings and cotton candy-topped s’mores stacks are also on the menu

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45. We Have Fun: A Free Weekly Comedy Show

Zach Sims (Comedy Central, Sirius XM) and Dan Wilbur (How Not To Read, The Onion) team up for a weekly stand-up show featuring the best comics from NYC and around the country. Lineups include comedians featured on The Late Show, Conan, Comedy Central, and more! The free show is on Wednesday at 7:30pm with Mary Cella (Comedy Central), Caitlin Reese (The Onion) and J.P. McDade (Just For Laughs).

 

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Just in case the myriad of private heated domes and cabins that are constantly popping up around town for the winter aren't enough, here is a new option for you: the glasshouses overlooking the East River at Watermark Winter Wonderland at Pier 15 in downtown Manhattan are now up and running. Once you get to the destination—which is a huge, 7,500-square-foot waterfront venue—you'll walk through a beautiful illuminated tunnel before entering one of the many cozy private glasshouses, which you can reserve right here. In addition to the phenomenal views of Brooklyn, Manhattan and the Williamsburg bridges, guests will delight in trying out the delicious cheese fondue, perhaps, or order the build-your-own-s'mores dish. We do also suggest warming up with the spiked hot chocolate or some cider. Last but not least, you'll notice a jumbo screen on premise, where holiday movies will be screening all season long. 

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Four storytellers across one hour will break barriers about sex and dating, all while making you laugh hysterically. The show pairs sexual inclusion with humor and sheds light on the awkward universal experience we all know and love. This month's line up includes: Molly Austin (Comedy Central), Gastor Almonte (Comedy Central), Gus Constantellis and more! Tickets are $15 online, $20 day of show. Doors at 7:30 pm. Show at 8 pm.

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

A high-end destination has opened at the South Street Seaport, combining a love for singalongs with delicious tabletop grills. Upstairs at Ssäm Bar is Momofuku's latest restaurant, this one located at Pier 17 (89 South Street, to be precise), on the second floor of Momofuku Ssäm Bar. While overlooking the East River, you'll get to sing your heart out to your favorite karaoke songs in one of two private rooms (each one accommodates up to 10 people) where you'll also get to order from the entire Asian-influenced menu. And because there is no karaoke without cocktails, here's a bit about that: from the Psycho Beach Party (mezcal, cynar, passionfruit, pineapple and blood orange) to the Toki Hot Toddy (Suntory Toki whisky, genmaicha tea and lemon) and the Suit & Chair (chai-infused rum, rockey's liqueur, ginger, salted plum and a chinotto float), you probably never have had such high-end drinks while screaming your lungs out to Prince's "Purple Rain." 

 

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  • Attractions
  • Greenwood

Industry City will be a holiday destination this year, because alongside all of its local shops and eateries, it'll once again have an open-air ice skating rink.

Starting on Friday, November 19, the outdoor rink in Courtyard 5/6 will be located next to an outdoor bar operated by Frying Pan Brooklyn that'll serve up hot cocoa and snacks. It'll also be decorated to the nines with holiday decor and be heated so don't worry about getting chilly.

The rink is open Thursdays 4-8pm; Fridays noon-8pm; Saturdays 11am-8pm; and Sundays 11am-6pm.

Tickets can be purchased on site or online.

  • Art
  • Central Park

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is literally making room for the real, lived history of Seneca Village, the once-thriving community founded by free Black New Yorkers that existed just a few hundred yards west of The Met between the 1820s and 1850s. The space, conceived and designed by Lead Curator and Designer Hannah Beachler (known for her work on Black Panther and Beyoncé’s "Lemonade" video) and Senior Exhibition Designer Fabiana Weinberg, includes a wood-framed 19th-century home that contains works from The Met’s American Wing that are reminiscent of pot shards and remnants from Seneca Village that were found in 2011. Representing the future with the past in mind, works of art and design from the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art are interspersed in the space as well as contemporary furniture, photography, and ceramics alongside from The Met’s Michael C. Rockefeller Wing.

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  • Bars
  • Lower East Side

The Public hotel (formally known as “PUBLIC”) first opened on the Lower East Side in 2017 and hasn’t stopped opening since. Its post pandemic-restriction relaunch in June included a Peruvian-inspired restaurant called Popular (POPULAR), the adjacent Cantina & Pisco Bar (CANTINA & PISCO BAR) and a rooftop (THE ROOF). Now, the hotel adds a jazzy cocktail lounge to its cruiseship-like variety with Bar Chrystie (. . . you get the idea). Bar Chrystie, located on the hotel’s lobby level, aims to evoke “1920s Hollywood glamour,” which is rude, because NYC had the '20s, too. To ice that burn it is also “celebrating New York City’s legendary cocktail culture,” according to press materials. But it is also, “inspired by Bar Hemingway at the Hôtel Ritz Paris and Harry’s Bar in Venice,” so I guess if there’s ever been a place than this is it. Bar Chrystie is adorned with un-chandeliered chandeliers, bright night sky-blue banquettes, a Baccarat candelabra and “metal orbs." Its opening menu includes a robust and detailed cocktail list including classics and signature offerings, wine, beer, cider and a complement of Champagne. Snacks like truffle flatbread, croquettes and warm roasted olives are also available.

  • Music
  • Music

Although it might seem counterintuitive to establish a new business at the tail end (hopefully) of a global pandemic, the venture seems to be paying off for 30-year-old Adrian Rew, the founder and owner of record store Ergot. Ergot, which opened less than two months ago on East 2nd Street and Second Avenue, is the evolution of Rew's eponymous music label. Ergot is a minimally decorated, clean-looking space that fits right into the neighborhood. Countless vinyls are available for browsing, with an entire wall displaying some noteworthy picks, from Faction by Réseau D'Ombres to Bill Orcutt's A Mechanical Joey and DMX's second album Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood. Although clearly carrying a variety of genres—disco! Latin! Gospel! Pop! Experimental!—Rew reveals that New Yorkers are currently gravitating towards jazz and new wave.

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  • Things to do

A new exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum offers an intimate look at Andy Warhol's upbringing, specifically dissecting how his Catholic religion impacted his life and his art.

Although Warhol's faith was prominently featured in his work, albeit reframed "within the context of pop art and culture," not much has been said about how he viewed his religion in light of his sexual orientation, for example. 

"Andy Warhol: Revelation" will feature over 100 objects—from rare source materials to newly discovered ones—"that provide a fresh and intimate look at Warhol's creative process." Among the roster of works on display expect to see his 1986 "Last Supper" series and his experimental film The Chelsea Girls, from 1966, which was commissioned by the de Menil family and funded by the Roman Catholic Church.

  • Art
  • The Bronx

Opening on November 10, the Bronx Museum of the Art's AIM Biennial "Bronx Calling" will showcase works that highlight the practice of everyday life in uncertain times. The 68 participating artists created works in response to multiple crises of health, grief, the environment and identity, including Yan Chen’s 8-foot-tall "High Palate" sculpture highlights the basic need of shelter by having viewers experience the intimate space of a pallet (the roof of a mouth) on an architectural scale and "All the Way to Hell" by artist Eliza Evan gives away mineral rights to a small property in Oklahoma to 1,000 people to impede the interest of oil and gas frackers. Jesse Kreuzer's work looks at current issues in American politics with a monumental 8-panel and 30-foot-long painting of a chaotic moment during a protest and Maggie Hazen’s work looks at the lost identities and voices of imprisoned girls at the Columbia Secure Center for Girls, a maximum security facility in New York’s Hudson Valley.

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

We'll be honest: we're not always the biggest fans of 230 Fifth. Don't get us wrong: the views from up there are beautiful and the drinks are delicious, but the rooftop gets pretty crowded during the year. Yet, once winter rolls around, we can't help but feel the pull of the midtown destination, when the staff sets up the famous heated igloos that we could spend all season in. The glowing cocoons, which opened to the public yesterday, will stay in place through April 15 and, as usual, will be able to accommodate up to ten guests at once. Yes, you'll still find warm red snuggies for use inside each one. Although reservations are suggested—especially if heading there with a group of six or more—the igloos are also accessible by walk-ins pending availability. You can plan your visit right here.

  • Things to do
  • City Life

A new audio tour by the Brooklyn Public Library seeks to explore the lives of the characters and authors that call the borough home in fiction and in real life. From Patti Smith to Biggie Smalls, Howard Zinn to Tanwi Nandini Islam, the guide covers a total of 16 writers over eight miles of Brooklyn. You can also expect to stop at important public libraries the likes of Washington Irving and Clinton Hill, which, according to an official press release, "played an important role in the lives of the featured author[s]." Expect the entire tour, which can virtually start off from anywhere in Brooklyn, to take at least two hours to complete, depending on how many stops you wish to make along the way.

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

If you're still reluctant to dine indoors this winter, you might want to consider heading to Nowadays in Bushwick, where the signature large backyard has just been winterized. And, yes, their usual yurts and heated tables are back for the season as well. Diner by Izakaya, the food operator at the destination, has just unveiled its latest menu, which sounds like it will really hit the spot in the colder months. Inspired by "famiresu" restaurants in Japan (that would be family-friendly eateries), the new menu is anchored by two main ramen offerings (tonkotsu, made with pork, and tantan, made with soy, sesame and miso broth with tempe). Drinks wise, warm beverages take center stage. From hot toddies to spiked hot cocoa, the libations take the cold into account but "regular" cocktails, beer and wine are also available. 

  • Theater
  • Theater & Performance

No show in town offers as intimate an experience as Bottom of the Ocean, a new interactive experience in Bushwick that has been created to be performed for just five audience members at a time. A surreal look at the nature of ritual and ceremony, Bottom of the Ocean invites spectators on a unique journey, and Time Out is happy to offer an exclusive sneak peek at it: Scroll down to see a brief trailer for the production as well as the first photographs from the show to be released to the public. The third production from Andrew Hoepfner’s company Houseworld Immersive, Bottom of the Ocean draws on techniques that Hoepfner explored previously in Houseworld and WhisperlodgeThe piece was created in collaboration with Chia Kwa, and features costumes by Laura Borys and tech design by Howard Rigberg. It is staged at Gymnopedie, a multiroom space that has been created by restoring 5,500 square feet of the 19th-century basement at Bushwick United Methodist Church.

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Overthrow Hospitality—the group behind New York favorites Amor y Amargo, Ladybird and Death and Co., among others—has just debuted an attention-grabbing champagne and absinthe bar in the East Village that is inspired by... hell. Café de L’Enfer, which literally translates to "hell cafe" from the French, opened earlier this month and the decor is just as striking as the cocktails, developed by mixologist Sother Teague. The destination, which calls out to the famous Victorian-era Cabaret de l'Enfer in Paris, is filled with touches of the underworld. Expect skulls, deep red booths and ogre-like statues to adorn the dark space, located directly above Amor y Amargo. Think of Café de L’Enfer as a year-round Halloween extravaganza.

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Lower East Side darling Meow Parlour, the famous cat cafe where New Yorkers get to play with adoptable cats while sipping coffee and munching on sweets, has finally reopened following an 18-month-long, pandemic-fueled closure. Now in "soft relaunch mode," the space at 46 Hester Street is welcoming guests with reservations on Saturdays and Sundays from 10am through 7pm. You can schedule your visit on the official website right here.

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Eataly, the massive Italian marketplace that has become a centerpiece of Flatiron, is debuting its first indoor restaurant concept since 2018 on November 5. Bar Milano, which will feature 70 seats in total, takes over Manzo's location, the meat-heavy eatery that closed over a year ago. As its name suggests, the new spot's menu will focus on foods endemic to Milano, one of the most traveled-to cities in Italy. From moneghili (crispy, Milanese-style braised beef and pork "meatballs") to risotto alla Milanese (saffron, bone marrow brodo, 18-month parmigianno Reggion), tajarin al tartufo bianco (house-made 40-yold pasta, Ferrarini butter, 36-month parmigiano Reggiano, freshly shaved urbani white truffles) and a classic Milanese cutlet (breaded, fried and served with Italian chicories, lemon and extra virgin olive oil), the list of offerings really does pay homage to one of the most multicultural (and New York-like?) towns on the other side of the Atlantic. But as exciting as the proposed food is, visitors will likely fawn over the roving wooden Negroni cart that will be on premise.

 

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking
The art-deco inspired cocktail lounge, Ophelia, reopened its annual Snow Globe in the Sky experience, on the 26th floor of the historic Beekman Tower in Midtown East (3 Mitchell Place at 49th & 1st Avenue). Dripping with crystal and sparkling snowflakes, Ophelia's wintery over-the-top decor creates glamorous holiday experience with unobstructed panoramic views of the city skyline all the way to Brooklyn. Garlands with thousands of crystals and sparkling snowflakes hang from the 17-foot ceiling in the main bar area, and also in the 360° greenhouse terrace. White sheepskin throws cover all of the velvet furniture, and golden candelabras line the tables and walls.
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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Sobre Masa, the Williamsburg pop-up tortilla factory opened in 2020 with imported Mexican heirloom corn, has turned full blown cafe, bar and restaurant is expanding to one of Brooklyn’s taco capitals, Bushwick. Sobre Masa Tortilleria opened its doors at 52 Harrison Place, selling fresh, house-made tortillas alongside Mexican groceries and goods, a morning coffee shop with Oaxacan coffee and house-made Mexican pastries, as well as a taqueria vending a variety of traditional taco styles and cocktails highlighting Mexican spirits. 

  • Nightlife
  • Nightlife

One of Texas' best exports to New York City is getting a new Manhattan location this monday. Alamo Drafthouse, the cinema known for serving restaurant-quality food and drinks during its screenings, is opening its second New York location in Manhattan. Adding to its downtown Brooklyn location, Alamo Drafthouse's second NYC locations will be at 28 Liberty St. with fourteen auditoriums that seat up to 578 guests in total. The theater chain is known for its luxury reclining seats with built-in tables and cupholders. It's like being in an elite private screening room, but anyone can buy a ticket. Movie buffs at Alamo's Lower Manhattan location will be treated to 4K digital projection and 7.1 Dolby surround sound. The opening screenings include current blockbusters like No Time to Die, and Marvel's Eternals as well as classics like 1933's original King Kong

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  • Movies
  • Documentary

It’s a tough gig to tackle the myth of the Velvet Underground. That myth says that classically trained son of a Welsh miner John Cale met troubled Dylan wannabe Lou Reed in New York and formed the most influential/unsuccessful band of all time, under the dubious auspices of Andy Warhol. Todd Haynes manages to do much more than tease that story out, though. His documentary is a lyrical and visual paean to the idea of what makes great art. Supposedly, this is the first proper film ever about the VU, and thank God. Unlike, say, the Beatles Anthology, there are no contemporary TV interviews, press conferences, airport arrivals. Basically, no one gave a shit about the Velvet Underground. There are no boring music historians here. Instead, Haynes marshals some choice talking heads – surviving members Cale and drummer Moe Tucker, and dancer Mary Woronov – and gorgeous, gorgeous footage, largely from the ever-spooling cameras of Warhol’s Factory. He makes a virtue of the band’s predicament as the catspaw of the artist to investigate their position as outsiders who found themselves insiders trying to break out. If you already love the Velvet Underground, this is two hours of visual and aural bliss. If you don’t, same. The Velvet Underground is in select cinemas and launches on Apple TV+ Oct 15.

  • Restaurants
  • Mexican
  • Greenwich Village

Newly opened in the West Village this past June, Yuco has 65 seats and an aim “to be the single most innovative Yucateco restaurant in the world.” Already, it's doing a bit to reorient fine dining in NYC. You can go to Yuco and spend $225 per person on its tasting menu before drinks, tax and tip. Nine courses are like a carousel of some of the best of what Yuco has to offer across its price tiers. A $95 prix-fixe lets you choose one item from first, main and mid-course sections. In a move that separates Yuco from NYC’s more antiquated institutions of higher eating, everything is available à la carte. Chef-partner Christian Ortiz’s excellent braised oxtail en mole, for example, appears on either the prix-fixe menu or on its own for $51. Even divorced from the pageantry of Yuco’s grandest tasting and the truncated spectacle of its second, the execution is remarkable. This is a ne plus ultra oxtail, rich and satiny and offset by a deep mole unlike what any other NYC restaurant has on its menu

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

Choosing from three categories of short stories, visitors to the Center For Fiction in Brooklyn can "push" a touchless button and the machine will dispense a scroll with a randomly chosen story for free. The stories that come out are curated by The Center for Fiction staff, drawing from its publishing company/creator Short Édition’s global database of literature and work created by The Center’s community of affiliated authors, emerging writer fellows, award winners and nominees, teachers, and students. One of the three buttons will always be dedicated to children’s stories, while the others will change themes throughout the year so that readers always get a fresh and diverse collection of stories, from classic folktales to contemporary voices. According to Short Édition, the idea is to offer a "tactile moment with a story on an eco-friendly scroll in 1min, 3min, or 5min reading times."

  • Things to do
  • Chelsea

New York City's first and only immersive exhibit about cannabis—and the only experience to encourage coming to it high—opens this week with eight rooms to take you on a journey across various states of being. The Stone Age, which is a woman and minority-owned business by Sasha Perelman and Elizabeth Santana, whisks you up a tunnel-like escalator into the exhibition which delves into the many benefits of cannabis, from increased creativity and arousal to euphoria, pain management and mindfulness by using eye-grabbing art installations across 9,000 square feet of its Chelsea building. Santana and Perelman wanted to create an experience that was "relatable no matter your relationship with cannabis." 

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  • Comedy
  • Midtown West

Comedy Nite Live is a new weekly stand-up comedy showthat features new comedians every week on Thursdays at 9pm at RPM Underground. Past comedians have included Usama Siddique, Zach Zimmerman, Jocelyn Chia, Derek Gaines, Robby Slowik and Kareem Green among others. What's cool is that the $5 ticket price includes an hour of free private-room karaoke after the show.

  • Restaurants
  • Harlem

The school cafeteria has nothing on this tapas restaurant. 

Oliva, a new Spanish restaurant by chef Franklin Becker, is adjacent to Manhattanville Market, which is within Columbia University’s Jerome L. Greene Science Center, but the offerings are far from university fare. 

The lively, fun West Harlem spot serves premium products sourced directly from Spain, showcasing shareable dishes with modern interpretations to whisk you across the Atlantic in just a few small bites. 

Oliva’s menu, developed with Chef de Cuisine Chris Strelnick, highlights cured meats, Embutidos, along with a variety of queso, a frio y ambiente section and finishes with a selection of calida y caliente. For non-hispanohablantes, that’s cold and hot dishes.

Standout dishes from the Fall 2021 opening menu include a mackerel and blood orange crudo, Serrano ham croquetas, crab fideos and a Soccarat, or seafood rice, for two. For dessert, a crema Catalana presents a creamy Barcelonian twist on more familiar creme brulee. 

The beverage menu, designed by mixologist Eamon Rockey, offers beverages from regions around Spain, local New York beers, ciders and spirits, plus cocktails designed to emulate the easygoing European lifestyle. There is, of course, sangria, as well as Spanish-style gin and tonics, with fresh and dried botanicals, and plenty of fortified wines, like sherry and vermouth.  

Live music nights help fill the floor-to-ceiling glass space with joy and celebration, and the restaurant serves as a nice pitstop for a drink and cheese plate before dinner or a full-on gathering hall for group celebrations. 

Oliva offers both indoor and outdoor dining and is open Tuesday through Thursday, 5pm-10pm, Friday and Saturday from 5pm-11pm and Sundays from 5pm-10pm. Reservations are accepted through Resy or by phone, 917-522-0391.

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  • Shopping
  • Shopping & Style

Vintage shopping has long been a Brooklyn past time, but two major brands are teaming up to push the joy of buying (gently) used closed even further. Madewell and thredUP, an fashion resale site, have launched a "Circular Store" in Williamsburg, selling exclusively secondhand clothes. Located at 89 N. 6th Street, which is typically Madewell's Men's store, this Circular Store be the first-ever shop of its kind, thoroughly stocked with preloved Madewell styles via thredUP. Prices range from $10-40, and categories include denim, dresses, jackets and more. ThredUP continues the circular concept by offering clean out kits at the store, to help shoppers keep their previously worn clothes in use, out of landfills, and sold to earn fashionistas a little cash, to well, spend at the circular store. 

  • Art
  • Art

The New York Public Library has dug through its expansive and centuries-spanning archive to stage an impressive free exhibition filled with cultural artifacts. Launching this week, The Polonsky Exhibition of New York Public Library’s Treasures spans 4,000 years of history and includes a wide range of history-making pieces, including the only surviving letter from Christoper Columbus announcing his “discovery” of the Americas to King Ferdinand’s court and the first Gutenberg Bible brought over to the Americas. It opens on September 24.

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  • Museums
  • Fashion and costume
  • Prospect Park

The Brooklyn Museum is giving The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute a run for its money this year with its high fashion exhibit featuring the House of Dior. "Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams" thoroughly explores the high fashion history of The House of Dior, which dates back to the turn of the 20th century, when the brand's namesake Christian Dior founded the label.

  • Art
  • Astoria

The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum are showcasing a collaborative exhibition with Eleni Petaloti and Leonidas Trampoukis of the Greece- and New York-based studio Objects of Common Interest. Works by Petaloti and Trampoukis, who take an intuitive approach to object and space making inspired by “moments of unfamiliar simplicity,” are interspersed within The Noguchi Museum’s garden and first-floor permanent installation.

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  • Art
  • Art

Andy Warhol's photography is getting its own exhibit at Fotografiska this fall that will showcase more than 120 images, 20 of which have never been shown to the public before. "Andy Warhol: Photo Factory," opening September 10, will pay homage to Warhol’s New York City studio and give viewers an inside look at his life and work. They'll come to understand how he experimented with photography and how it served as a springboard for his iconic silkscreen paintings, commissioned portraits, and commercial work.

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Real New Yorkers are on the constant search for cool places to drink coffee — and a new Chelsea Market spot delivers. Day Drinks, a coffee and tea bar that dubs itself "a bar without alcohol" has officially opened in the food hall. Born from a conversation between the founders of artisan coffee roaster Pulley Collective and specialty coffee shop Ninth Street Espresso, which has been inside Chelsea Market for years, Day Drinks aims to redefine the coffee bar experience. Here, guests can order from extensive, locally sourced coffee and tea lists, as well as pick from kegged beverages including on-tap espressos, nitro coffees, sparkling teas, and botanicals. Everything is roasted, brewed, and carbonated on site, meaning that expert bartenders can then work directly with taps and ingredients, and tailor drinks specifically to each customer’s exact tastes, just like at a cocktail bar. By making everything on-site, Day Drinks also has an almost neutral carbon footprint.

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Roosevelt Island, the storied former home to NYC's smallpox hospital and insane asylum, has its first-ever rooftop bar and lounge open to the public. Panorama Room is now open atop the newly opened Graduate Roosevelt Island hotel on the southern end of the island and the views are really unparalleled — perhaps even the best of any rooftop lounge. Located on the 18th floor of the hotel, the "jewel box" space by Med Abrous and Marc Rose, who are food and beverage partners of the hotel and co-founders of the hospitality group Call Mom, opens up to incredible views of the boroughs, the bridges and the East River, which shine like stars at night. Designed by James Beard Award-winning design firm Parts and Labor Design, Panorama Room is visually dramatic. Its palatial vibes are set by luxurious velvet vintage-inspired tubular lounge sofas, chrome and marble touches, mosaic tile columns and its giant, tubular acrylic chandeliers that hover above the massively long bar. It's not only luxe but it's somehow simultaneously futuristic and retro. 

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  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Next stop for your cross-continental taste buds: Indian-Mexican fare by restaurateur PriaVanda Chouhan. Eight years ago, Chouhan launched the popular Indian street food concept Desi Galli in Kips Bay, and now, at her second location in Alphabet City, she is adding a full sit-down tasting menu experience with Desi Garden. Originally, Desi Galli's fast-casual concept was envisioned in order to satisfy the New York Desi community's desire for Indian soul food. During the pandemic, however, Chouhan recognized that many of her regular customers were craving more experiences that extended beyond her typical fast-casual menu. This year, she decided to pivot into a full-service restaurant to reach her clientele, and Desi Garden was born.

 

  • Art
  • Public art
  • Brooklyn Heights

A new, reflective and immersive artwork has been installed in DUMBO at Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Main Street Park section. "Rehearsal" by Berlin-based artist Claudia Wieser is made up of five large-scale geometric sculptures clad with hand-painted glazed tiles, panels featuring photographs of New York City in the 1980s and '90s and Roman and Greek antiquities, and mirror-polished stainless steel. They range in height from 7 to 13 feet and are encased in more than 1,000 warm and cool-toned clay tiles that were hand-painted by the artist in her Berlin studio.

The installation is meant to give passersby a moment of reflection and see themselves in the reflective artwork as "actors in their own urban narrative" as it is located at the iconic terminus of Washington Street, where the Manhattan Bridge frames the Empire State Building. 

"Wieser is acutely aware that the sculptures will become part of the landscape of the city for a time and wanted to create a powerful synergy with the bustling surroundings of DUMBO. Building a dialogue between the public and the sculptures is an integral part of Rehearsal," says Public Art Fund Associate Curator Katerina Stathopoulou. "Parkgoers will activate the works by touching, resting, and seeing themselves and the city reflected as they weave their way through the constellation of sculptures."

The sculptures were made with the public in mind — to provide an opportunity for escape, respite, and connection as we re-emerge into our shared world. It'll be on through April 17, 2022 at Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Main Street Park section.

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  • Things to do
  • Flatiron

The Museum of Sex always has something exciting going on behind closed doors. "Super Funland: Journey into the Erotic Carnival" is back and better than ever with its 4-D immersive “Tunnel of Love” ride, the Love & Lust Deity Derby game, an erotic fortune-telling machine (modeled as RuPaul), a kissing booth, the Glory Stall game, an immersive "Stardust Lane - the Erogenous Kaleidoscope," an erotic mechanical bull and a lit-up climbing structure, "The Climbx," and more. Then when it's time to take the edge off, visitors can slide down a spiral slide into the Museum’s psychedelic carnival bar, Lollipop Lounge, for cocktails. 

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

One White Street spans three stories at the storied address 1 White Street, which was the theoretical site of Yoko Ono and John Lennon’s Nutopian Embassy in 1973. Each floor has its own separate dining room with its own open kitchen. The space is neutrally hued, lined in pale wood and has pops of blue throughout. The first floor is designated for walk-ins and seats 23. The second and third floors are reservations-only. The opening menu includes chilled foie gras with peaches, plums and hazelnut, grilled monkfish, glazed gnocchi and a 60-day-aged strip loin. Ingredients are sourced from Rigor Hill Farm in the Hudson Valley, and wine selections from small, sustainability-oriented makers reflect those locally-grown goods. The downstairs menu is à la carte and a $148 six-course tasting menu will be available upstairs.

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Taste your way around the world at a new wine bar that offers dozens of international wines, all by the glass. Temperance Wine Bar (40 Carmine Street), which officially opened yesterday, is a new neighborhood drinking spot with a fun energy and eclectic design featuring local artists. Most importantly, there's plenty to drink. At Temperance, Ojeda-Pons has curated an extensive menu of over 100 rotating international wines by the glass, as well as a selection of eight wines on tap. The wines range from affordable to higher-end, featuring classic European producers like Foradori and Clotilde Davenne, wines from New York like Millbrook Estate in the Hudson River Valley and Osmote in the Finger Lakes, wines from across the US like Monte Rio Cellars in California and Day Wines in the Willamette Valley, as well as wines from less traditional wine regions including countries like Morocco, Lebanon and Cyprus, and more. Other wine categories featured include smaller producers, lesser-known grape varieties, natural wines, orange wines, year-round rosés, sherry, sparkling wines from Champagne, and beyond.

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

After Time Out first confirmed with Lucali owner Mark Iacono last month that his new slice shop was in the works, Baby Luc’s opened on Saturday with zero promotional fanfare but all the excitement we’ve come to expect for an operation by the famed pizzaiolo. In June, Iacono told us he was “nervous” about the new spot, even though Baby Luc’s has been in the theoretical works for quite some time, being that Lucali was originally intended as a slice shop. Lucali demonstrably worked out just fine in its eventual, whole pie form, as lines still accrue night after night. And it’s already the same deal at Baby Luc’s.

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  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

The venue formerly known as Fat Cat has reemerged with a new name, new games, and custom ice cream. Cellar Dog (75 Christopher St.) is reviving the Fat Cat tradition of late-night basement gaming, with an updated concept for 2021. Cellar Dog will remain a live music and game hall, making the most of the 9,000-square-foot underground space. Games include pool tables, ping pong, shuffleboard, foosball, checkers and chess, as well as antique and novelty arcade games including Pac Man and many more. Live jazz and additional entertainment will also be booked throughout the week.

  • Things to do
  • Midtown West

Immersive art exhibit Arcadia Earth has reopened after being closed due to the pandemic, and it looks better than ever! The exhibit aims to inspire visitors artistically and ethically, as it uses 15 rooms to spotlight the environmental challenges that our planet is facing (such as overfishing, food waste, and climate change). This exhibit will not only leave visitors in awe, but it will help support Oceanic Global, an organization devoted to raising awareness around our aquatic ecosystems. In addition, a tree will also be planted for every ticket sold, making it a perfect gift for your eco-conscious friends!

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  • Art
  • Art

New York City is seeing its fair share of immersive exhibits with massive digital projections, from the dueling van Gogh shows to "Geometric Properties" at ARTECHOUSE. But the real O.G. is back. SuperReal has reopened at Cipriani 25 Broadway, inside the historic Cunard Building, bringing its cutting-edge projection mapping tech and multimedia art to its walls and ceiling—and it happens to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Cunard Building, which opened in 1921. Across 45 minutes, the show places viewers in five unique and abstract sequences that are both stunning and interactive. One minute you could be daydreaming in a fairylike flower garden and the next you're caught in an epic thunderstorm or thrown into the middle of a tropical disco. During the show, people are encouraged to relax on bean bags or play with balloons that also react with the 360-degree show. The floor is a gigantic mirror that only enhances the special effects. It's the ultimate place for selfies and fun Instagram fodder.

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Get ready, New York, your acceptance letter to Hogwarts is here—the most magical place in New York City, the Harry Potter Store New York, is about to open on June 3. Wizards and witches will be able to shop from the world's largest collection of Harry Potter merch across 21,000 square feet at 935 Broadway in the Flatiron District at this highly-anticipated store. We've been waiting for a year to walk through these magical doors and on Friday, we were finally able to check it out. And Harry Potter fans? You're going to flip. Every detail of Harry Potter Store New York has been intricately designed, from the decor sitting on the shelves above all the incredible merch (yes, there are full house robes) to the design of the store itself, which has a room full of gorgeous HP stationary by MinaLima, massive models of Fawkes the Phoenix and a moving griffin as well as a spiral staircase that descends into a space made to look like the Ministry of Magic. 

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  • Things to do
  • City Life

Looking for some new spots in the city to explore as the five boroughs continue to reopen? Here’s an underground spot you’ll want to add to your list. Coby Club is a new, subterranean lounge opening on Seventh Ave that’s inspired by 1960s San Francisco nightlife. The lush space pays homage to San Francisco Chinatown nightlife in the 1960s and one woman in particular who was at the heart of it: Miss Coby Yee, the glamorous dancer and owner of the iconic club Forbidden City. The space certainly does have a sense of mystique to it with black velvet banquettes and red, silk-shaded lighting. In one especially timely touch, the walls are adorned with gold embossed phoenix-like dragons, meant—in part—to represent the city’s nightlife dramatically rising from the ashes this year with a new sense of strength and optimism. Who doesn’t love a little metaphorical wall art? When the space opens on April 22, you can swing by for craft cocktails and small plates. Live musical performances and other forms of live entertainment are planned for the near future once current restrictions relax. The owner behind the new lounge, Bob Pontarelli, has launched other well-known past restaurant and nightlife ventures, including Crowbar, Barracuda, Leshko’s, Elmo and Industry Bar. 

  • Art
  • Art

On March 15, The Frick Madison opened at 945 Madison Avenue—the former home of the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Met Breuer—while Henry Clay Frick's mansion undergoes a massive renovation. This new stint will last two years, and while the Brutalist building by Marcel Breuer is a huge departure from the Gilded Age mansion, the space is offering a much different and rare look at the collection, according to museum officials. Unlike at the Frick Mansion, the Breuer building is a clean slate—stark in contrast, which actually helps to attract the viewer's attention to individual works. Eyes aren't busy looking at ornate furniture here. It's all about seeing the smaller details in the artwork that you might have overlooked at the mansion. According to Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Director Ian Wardropper, "It's a different Frick than you’ve ever known."

 

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  • Things to do

Fall in NYC is everything you could hope for in a season. First, the city gets delightfully spooky for Halloween. With thrilling Halloween events and Halloween festivals happening in every borough, it’s easy to get in the spirit of things! Aside from pumpkins and funky costumes though, you can keep the autumn excitement going by leaf peeping around the city, warming up with whiskey, parades, virtual parties and so much more. Autumn in NYC is tough to match!

  • Things to do

'Tis the season to get spooky! But beyond the best Halloween events, but there are also plenty of other awesome NYC events in October 2020. Use our events calendar to plan the quintessential month for leaf peeping and spotting fall foliage, pumpkin picking and more things to do in fall.

Kick off fall with some epic cultural events, you don't want to miss happening like Open House New York, Oktoberfest and new haunted pop-up drive throughs.

 

RECOMMENDED: Full NYC events calendar for 2020

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  • Things to do

2020 has been scary enough, but we're throwing the spookiness into high gear for Halloween this month. Typically, October is filled with costumed parties, jump scares at haunted houses, corn mazes and parades, but this year will be a little different. For one, the Village Halloween Parade is canceled, and it's likely most of the city's regularly scheduled scary haunts will be as well given the current pandemic. That being said, there are still quite a few things still taking place, and with Halloween (finally) taking place on a Saturday, it'll be easier to celebrate. Don't bother breaking out your sewing kit, New York's greatest Halloween stores have plenty of options to make you look really spooky. Make sure to check out our NYC events in October too for even more activities to finish off the month in killer spirits. 

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to Halloween in NYC

  • Things to do

Want to know what’s happening in New York today, this weekend or in the coming months? Use our NYC events calendar 2020 as your guide to find the best things to do in the fall, winter and spring. Major events to look forward to this time of year include The Village Halloween Parade, Oktoberfest and the best places to see fall foliage in the city. Ready to unleash your inner culture vulture? Peep our top picks for the best art shows and concerts this year. All you need to do is buy the tickets!

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