Get us in your inbox

Search
Six golden retrievers sit on a table.
Photograph: Courtesy of American Kennel Club

The best things to do in NYC this weekend

The best things to do in NYC this weekend include AKC's Meet the Breeds, Lunar New Year events, a pop-up market in Brooklyn, cool outdoor art and Bodega Kids Comedy.

Written by
Rossilynne Skena Culgan
Contributors
Anna Rahmanan
&
Shaye Weaver
Advertising

Looking for the best things to do in NYC this weekend? Whether you’re the group planner searching for more things to do in NYC today or you have no plans yet, here are some ideas to add to your list for this weekend: The best things to do in NYC this weekend include AKC's Meet the Breeds, Lunar New Year events, a pop-up market in Brooklyn, cool outdoor artBodega Kids Comedy and free events around town. All you have to do is scroll down to plan your weekend!

RECOMMENDED: Full list of the best things to do in NYC
RECOMMENDED: The best New York attractions

Stay in the Loop: Sign up for our free weekly newsletter to get the latest in New York City news, culture and dining. 

Time Out Market New York
  • Things to do
  • DUMBO

Enjoy a relaxing and fun night out at Friday Ryeday at Time Out Market, where you can catch classic movies that’ll inspire nostalgia, play board games with friends and drink specialty cocktails and tastings courtesy of Sagamore Rye.

It launches Friday, January 13, and happens each Friday from 6 to 10pm.

Things to do in NYC this weekend

  • Movies

Looking back, it's hard to imagine that some of the films we now consider canonical didn't get much love during their era. Now, with a nod to the film awards season, Museum of the Moving Image is giving the films their due with "Snubbed: Great Movies, No Nominations." The screening series, which runs through March 12, features 24 American films that received no Academy Award nominations despite acclaim or long-lasting cultural impact.

Some of these were regarded as appalling snubs at the time, and in some cases, the lack of recognition has lingered. But many of these films are considered classics or have aged pretty well. Other snubs exposed moments of inequity, prejudice and injustice. Films include Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights, Leo McCarey’s Make Way for Tomorrow, Hal Ashby’s Harold and Maude, Martin Scorsese’s The King of Comedy, Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye, David Lynch’s Inland Empire, Spike Lee’s Crooklyn and more.

 

  • Dance

A Queens tradition for more than a decade, Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company returns to Kupferberg Center with a spectacular performance to welcome the coming of the Spring of 2023, the Year of the Water Rabbit. The performance on Sunday, February 5 combines traditional Chinese celebration with modern flair.

This year, to honor the 50th Anniversary of Hip-Hop, the Company will present a new Lion dance with hip hop rhythm. The new work is a collaborative effort from Company’s Director of New and Contemporary Dance, PeiJu Chien-Pott, assisted by H+ | The Hip-Hop Dance Conservatory’s Yvonne H. Chow, Lion Dance Master Henry Lee, and Hip-Hop legends Kwikstep and Rokafella.

The Company will also peform the festive "YungGe" (Harvest Song) from northern China, a beautiful and elegant "Peacock Dance" from the Southern Yunnan Province, a powerful martial art solo "Spear Dance" and the perennial favorite, the majestic "Dragon Dance." The Chinese Music Ensemble of New York will present two instrumental pieces, a Pipa Solo and an ensemble featuring Erhu (two string violin), Pipa (Lute) and Dizi (bamboo flute).

Advertising
  • Things to do

See traditional lion dances and ribbon twirling in this event series hosted at The Shops at Hudson Yards in partnership with the New York Chinese Cultural Center. Performances will be held every Saturday from January 17 through February 6. A trail of decor, including lanterns, wreaths, and more will greet you inside the mall. 

If you spend $188 or more on the same day, anywhere inside The Shops & Restaurants, you'll score a complimentary gift of bamboo chopsticks in a silk sleeve at the Concierge Desk on Level 1.

  • Shopping
  • Markets and fairs

Shop local from 40 vendors/makers at the Brooklyn Pop-Up Artisan Markets coming to the Brooklyn Museum this winter. Market dates are as follows: Sunday, January 29; Saturday, February 4; Sunday, February 12; Saturday, March 4; and Sunday, March 12.

The Saturday, February 4 event will celebrate Black History Month by spotlighting only Black-owned artisan businesses. The Saturday, March 4 event will celebrate Women's History Month with a focus on women-owned businesses.

Advertising
  • Art
  • Art

Statues of nine men from history and religion perch atop the courthouse near Madison Square Park. Now, for the first time, the representation of a woman has joined their noble rooftop plinths. 

"Havah…to breathe, air, life," an exhibition by artist Shahzia Sikander focusing on themes of justice, has brought stunning golden sculptures to Madison Square Park and the nearby courthouse at 27 Madison Avenue (officially called the Courthouse of the Appellate Division, First Department of the Supreme Court of the State of New York). The statues will be on view through June 4, 2023. 

  • Dance
  • Ballet
  • Upper West Side

Having put The Nutcracker to bed for another year, NYCB returns to Lincoln Center for five more weeks. Principal among the offerings are the world premiere of Justin Peck's Copland Dance Episodes—the first original full-evening work created for the company in nearly 20 years—as well as the debut of a dance by Keerati Jinakunwiphat and, to conclude the engagement, a two-week run of Peter Martins's version of the Tchaikovsky classic The Sleeping Beauty (February 15–26). Also on the lineup are many pieces by company cofounder George Balanchine along with short works by Peck, Jerome Robbins, Alexei Ratminsky, Christopher Wheeldon. The company's current constellation of étoiles comprises Jared Angle—who will dance his final performance on February 4—as well as Tyler Angle, Harrison Ball, Ashley Bouder, Chun Wai Chan, Adrian Danchig-Waring, Megan Fairchild, Jovani Furlan, Joseph Gordon, Anthony Huxley, Sterling Hyltin, Russell Janzen, Sara Mearns, Tiler Peck, Unity Phelan, Taylor Stanley, Daniel Ulbricht, Andrew Veyette, Peter Walker and Indiana Woodward. Visit the City Ballet website for a full schedule of events.

Advertising
  • Art
  • Art

A new kinetic installation is now wowing visitors to the Broadway plazas in the Garment District between 39th and 40th Streets.

Dubbed "Living Lantern," the dynamic piece will actually be fueled by the wind and viewers will get to see its outer membranes open and close, allowing light to filter from its core and change the lantern's colors, in real time.

To catch the mesmerizing installation in all of its glory, we suggest heading there after sunset, so you can fully experience the changing lights and colors. It's on view through February 24. 

  • Restaurants

New York City Restaurant Week comes but twice a year, and reservations for the winter edition are open now. Tables are available for brunch, lunch and dinner at more than 500 restaurants citywide from January 17-February 12. This year’s price points are $30, $45 and $60 for two and three-course lunch and dinner menus on the days of each venue’s choosing. 

With so many sensational new restaurantsromantic spots and NYC classics, and so little time to taste them all, it can be hard to narrow the field. We've got your guide to the best places to visit during NYC Restaurant Week this winter.

Advertising
  • Art
  • Art

The color of the year for 2023: Pantone's Viva Magenta, a hue evoking bravery, optimistic celebration and self-expression without restraint. 

Now you can immersive yourself in the energy of that purply-pinkish-red tone at ARTECHOUSE's newest technology-driven experiential art experience called MAGENTAVERSE. The multi-sensory exhibit is open in Chelsea through May 29.

  • Dance
  • Ballet
  • Upper West Side

Having put The Nutcracker to bed for another year, NYCB returns to Lincoln Center for five more weeks. Principal among the offerings are the world premiere of Justin Peck's Copland Dance Episodes—the first original full-evening work created for the company in nearly 20 years—as well as the debut of a dance by Keerati Jinakunwiphat and, to conclude the engagement, a two-week run of Peter Martins's version of the Tchaikovsky classic The Sleeping Beauty (February 15–26). Also on the lineup are many pieces by company cofounder George Balanchine along with short works by Peck, Jerome Robbins, Alexei Ratminsky, Christopher Wheeldon. The company's current constellation of étoiles comprises Jared Angle—who will dance his final performance on February 4—as well as Tyler Angle, Harrison Ball, Ashley Bouder, Chun Wai Chan, Adrian Danchig-Waring, Megan Fairchild, Jovani Furlan, Joseph Gordon, Anthony Huxley, Sterling Hyltin, Russell Janzen, Sara Mearns, Tiler Peck, Unity Phelan, Taylor Stanley, Daniel Ulbricht, Andrew Veyette, Peter Walker and Indiana Woodward. Visit the City Ballet website for a full schedule of events.

Advertising
  • Bars
  • Brooklyn Heights

Lean into winter by heading up to this super cool spot in Dumbo called the Polar Lounge.

Harriet’s Rooftop on the 10th floor of 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge has transformed into a winter oasis with a glacial landscape of carved ice sofas, stools and tables by Okamoto Studio and a menu of cocktails served in ice glasses. It's only made cooler by incredible views of the Manhattan skyline and the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges. 

The Polar Lounge is open from January 12 through February 26; book here.

  • Theater
  • Drama
  • Hell's Kitchen

Brooklyn's very own January theater and dance fest returns at locations throughout the borough, including the Brick, Brick Aux, Target Margin Theater, Jack, Life World and We Are Here. Among the shows to look out for are Tristan Allen's Tin Iso and the Dawn, Dmitri Barcomi's A Jury of Our Queers, Ella Davidson's The Ben Shapiro Project, Tank's Mx. Piggy Makes an OnlyFans, Devon Wade Granmo's (untitled human composting play), Travis Amiel and Cosimo Pori's Das Sofortvergnügen (The Instant Pleasure), Addie Ulrey's Circus Trick
and Joey Merlo's On Set with Theda Bara.

Advertising
  • Things to do
  • City Life

Seeing the New York City skyline from up high is a priceless experience, but doing so while skating alongside friends is even more special.

Now, you can do just that at Hudson Yards' Sky Skate, the highest skating rink in the city. The synthetic rink is found found in the indoor portion of the sky deck at Edge, the tallest outdoor sky deck in the Western Hemisphere. Tickets, starting at $48/adult, are available through March 14. 

  • Art
  • Art

The Met's kicking off 2023 with an exhibit of life-size photomurals by Richard Avedon. Celebrating the centennial of the artist's birth in 1923, the show presents a selection of the photographers innovative group portraits. The exhibit focuses on Avedon's creativity between 1969 and 1971 when he experimented with sense of scale to create monumental photomurals. Some of his work even chronicled the era's most well-known figures, including Andy Warhol.

The show runs through November 1, 2023. 

Advertising
  • Things to do
  • City Life

One of our very favorite things to do in the winter in NYC is officially back up and running: bumper cars on ice at Bryant Park!

The experience will kick off this Friday, January 13 and run through March 4. Tickets ($20 to $25) are available right here. A few details: rides will last about 10 minutes and occur on a first-come, first-served basis within your one-hour booking window.

  • Things to do
  • Walks and tours

Did you know that in 1967, Martin Luther King, Jr. led a protest and gave a speech in Central Park? This project helped re-ignite a long tradition of activism in the Park dating back to the 1800s and continuing today.

In honor of Marting Luther King, Jr. Day, expert guides from the Central Park Conservancy are leading 90-minute tours exploring the park's history of activism. You'll get to follow in the footsteps of activists and learn how Central Park became a democratic space where people feel empowered to use their voice and take a stand.

Tours run on the following dates: Friday, January 27; Thursday, February 16; and Sunday, February 19.

Advertising
  • Art
  • Art

Nearly a century ago, Virginia Woolf began pushing the boundaries of literature and eviscerating the patriarchy. Her words still resonate today. 

A landmark new exhibit at New York Public Library, "Virginia Woolf: A Modern Mind" explores the famed author's life and creative process. It's on view for free now through March 5, 2023 at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building (the library's main branch by Bryant Park).

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Movies
  • Romance

There is a difference between a small film and an intimate film. Mia Hansen-Løve’s (Eden) latest falls firmly in the latter category. It explores love, both romantic and familial, with no trace of drama or sappiness, and without ever feeling slight. It’s a balm of a film and another glorious showcase for the director’s light touch when dealing with complicated emotions. 

Subtle moments of pure feeling that make the film shine. 

It opens in US theaters Jan 27, 2023.

Advertising
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Movies

Midnight movies at Sundance never fail to generate some shock and awe. Whether it’s gore, torture porn or graphic sex, the horror that unfolds knocks audiences for six and reverberates almost instantly around the world. Here, then, is the latest outing from Canadian auteur Brandon Cronenberg, his third after 2020’s Possessor and 2012’s Antiviral, ready to be unleashed.  

Infinity Pool premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. It's in US theaters January 27; here's our reviewer's take.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Movies

To the pantheon of films about the pains of leaving childhood behind – The 400 Blows, The Spirit of the Beehive, Rocks, The Go-BetweenBoyhood et al – we should find a spot for this beautiful elegy of lost innocence from Belgian director Lukas Dhont (Girl). It’s a story of friendship and loss: a quiet tornado of overwhelming emotions that articulates perfectly what it is to be young and adrift.

Our film reviewer gave it four stars; here's why. 

Advertising
  • Bars
  • Cocktail bars

Whether you abstain from alcohol year-round, or simply cannot stop talking about Dry January at the beginning of every year, nonalcoholic cocktails—sometimes sectioned on menus as “zero-ABV,” “spirit-free,” “mock-” or “soft cocktails”—have almost reached ubiquity in NYC. 

Many otherwise buzzy new openings will offer some dedicated boozeless option, and a few of our most beloved, established drinking destinations continue to craft their un-tipsy sips, too. These are the best places in town to grab a drink, dry or otherwise.

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Curious wanderers may not-so-easily stumble upon the latest speakeasy concept to populate Flushing’s Murray Hill neighborhood: Below Shaku, a covert, 25-seat bar inspired by Shanghai’s Golden Age of the 1930s.

Decor-wise, the space feels clandestine yet luxurious, with dim lighting, red accents all around and unpolished nero maquina walls. In addition to its hard-to-find location (the joint is inside a mall that’s also home to an H Mart, manicure salons, a decades-old pho shop and Shaku Ramen, an unassuming full-service ramen restaurant that sits atop the speakeasy and is operated by the same management), the venue hopes to stand out through its drink menu, which focuses on DIY fresh fruit soju drinks that patrons will be able to mix for themselves.

Advertising
  • Art

See the miniature magic of cinema come alive at this new MOMA exhibit, "Guillermo del Toro: Crafting Pinocchio." The exhibition digs into the craft and process behind the celebrated filmmaker's first stop-motion animation film. And, wow, what a staggering process it is. 

In meticulous detail, the exhibition highlights the handcrafted nature of stop-motion filmmaking, which demands careful movement of each piece, step by tiny step. You'll see a time-lapse video of an animator at work, set pieces, puppets, marionettes, drawings, archival photos and props from the film.

The show is on view through April 15, 2023. Also check out the film series connected with the exhibition. 

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Winter’s “it” sport, curling, is having a moment in Queens at JFK Airport’s TWA Hotel. If you’re not familiar with the sport, it’s simple: Curling is much like bowling and shuffleboard. You take turns sliding stones (at TWA Hotel it’s gray rocks with red and blue handles) across the rink toward a target. To play your own game, it’s free and is first come, first served (you can’t reserve a spot, unless it’s for a big group or event—email events@twahotel.com or call 213-790-3730). Just show up and plan your day around it.

There’s plenty to do at TWA Hotel, from drinking in its swanky 1960s-themed bars, including the Connie, to checking out its cool recreated mid-century living room, its awesome outdoor hot tub and the Runway Chalet. Make a weekend of it and stay at the hotel!

Advertising
  • Theater
  • Circuses & magic
  • Midtown East

Steve Cohen, billed as the Millionaires’ Magician, conjures high-class parlor magic in the marble-columned Madison Room at the swank Lotte New York Palace. Audiences must dress to be impressed (cocktail attire is required); tickets start at $125, with an option to pay more for meet-and-greet time and extra tricks with Cohen after the show.

But if you've come to see a classic-style magic act, you get what you pay for. Sporting a tuxedo and bright rust hair, the magician delivers routines that he has buffed to a patent-leather gleam: In addition to his signature act—"Think-a-Drink," involving a kettle that pours liquids by request—highlights include a lulu of levitation trick and a card-trick finale that leaves you feeling like, well, a million bucks.

Advertising
  • Art
  • Art

Peek inside this new, teeny-tiny shop in Harlem to find some fun gifts for someone on your list or for yourself.

MoonLab 42 measures in at just under 5 feet wide, but the store manages to house zines, books, records, incense, prints, candles, decorative objects, ceramics, jewelry, accessories, clothing and more. “It feels like a Mary Poppins bag,” Ruso Margishvili, the concept store’s co-owner tells us. 

Advertising
  • Restaurants

Even when the weather outside is frightful, NYC’s outdoor dining is still delightful, whether you’re boldly braving the winter air at a rooftop spot or seeking somewhere with maximum cozy appeal. To achieve the latter, you’ll need some combination of covered sidewalk seats, outside heat, occasional enclosures and good old analog blankets. The coziest outdoor dining spots in town have you covered, with terrific food and drinks to further fortify yourself against the temps. 

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Spas are thrilling new neighborhood additions no matter what, but an urban bathhouse and wellness club focusing on treatments originating from all over the world is likely to bring a whole new level of excitement to any city area.

That's exactly what World Spa, the new 50,000-square-foot space opening at 1571 McDonald Avenue in Brooklyn is promising to achieve. As its name implies, the destination is bringing a slew of authentic spa experiences from all around the world smack-dab in the middle of Brooklyn.

Advertising
  • Things to do

Skate among the skyscrapers at The Rink at Manhattan West, now open through March 2023. 

The the 60x80 rink is located just one block from the New York Rangers home turf, Madison Square Garden, which makes it an even cooler place to skate. Find the rink among Manhattan West’s expansive 2.5-acre public plaza that spans 9th to 10th Avenues and 31st to 33rd Streets. 

Manhattan West is home to a bunch of restaurants like Ci Siamo, Zou Zou’s, Casa Dani, Katsuya and Hidden Leaf, so you can grab some food to fuel your skating. 

The rink is open on weekdays from 2-9:15pm and weekends/holidays from 10am-10:15pm. 

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Among the plenty of heated huts, chalets and greenhouses that pop up across town as the weather turns frigid, City Winery's igloos are some of our favorites—and they're officially back for the season.

Folks can now schedule their visits at both City Winery's Wine Garden in Rockefeller Plaza and at City Winery at Pier 26 in Hudson River Park. Each igloo can be reserved for up to eight guests at once.

To reserve your very own igloo at Rockefeller Plaza, where you'll also be able to gaze at the iconic Christmas Tree, follow this link. If you're partial to the Pier 26 location, click here

Advertising
  • Things to do
  • Events & Festivals

Just last year, the Trust for Governors Island launched a unique winter village that quickly became a local holiday season must-visit. Unsurprisingly, the setup is back for a second year in a row through February 2023 with expanded public hours for winter-adjacent activities, food and drink options, on-site games, fire pits and a 7,500-square-foot skating rink for visitors of all ages.

Advertising
  • Things to do
  • City Life

After a run in London, "Titanic. The Exhibition" has officially opened on this side of the Atlantic at 526 6th Avenue by 14th Street near Union Square.

In about 80 to 90 minutes, ticket holders come face-to-face with a selection of personal artifacts that have never before been on display in the United States, offering an intense view into the lives of the legendary ship's passengers and crew, 15,000 of whom tragically passed away on April 15, 1912 when the liner hit an iceberg on a voyage from Southampton in the United Kingdom to New York City.

Tickets are on sale now through the end of January 2023.

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Get nostalgic and ride in a bumper car at The Standard Hotel by the High Line.

The entire redesigned is an ode to 1980s punk culture (think safety pins, “Barbiecore” uniforms and mohawks everywhere), complete with a delicious food and drink menu featuring both comforting classics and more modern offerings.

Advertising
  • Theater
  • Theater & Performance

From amazing costumes to Broadway history to fun photo opps, this long-awaited new museum is a must-see for theater buffs.  

You can expect the new museum to highlight over 500 individual productions from the 1700s all the way to the present. 

Among the standout offerings will also be a special exhibit dubbed "The Making of a Broadway Show," which honors the on- and off-stage community that helps bring plays and musicals to life multiple times a week. 

  • Music
  • Music

A new electronic music club in the heart of the Lower East Side dubbed Virgo is now open. This 3,000-square-foot EDM destination at 324 Grand Street by Orchard Street isn't only noteworthy because of its focus on deep house music, a genre that many New Yorkers think hasn't received as much attention as it deserves in recent years, but exciting because of its investment in a state-of-the-art sound system that was actually imported from the United Kingdom.

Advertising
  • Art
  • Art

A snowman greets visitors at Color Factory's Winter Colorland experience, leading the way to an indoor sledding hill, a confetti forest and more seasonal surprises.

Color Factory, the vibrant interactive art museum in Soho, already knows how to spark joy for visitors. Now they're taking the joyful fun to the next level with this special, limited-time holiday installation open through the end of January.

Think of it like a wintry adventure ... only indoors without the snow, frigid temperatures and dry skin. Ride a ski lift through a confetti snow storm, traipse through a plaid confetti forest and relax on a cozy sky lift chair. Color Factory's signature ball pit will turn wintry with a chance to go sledding indoors.

  • Art
  • Art

Warning: You’re bound to feel hungry after exploring this new exhibit at New-York Historical Society Museum & Library all about Jewish deli culture. Pastrami sandwiches, knishes, bagels, pickles and babka all get their due in “I'll Have What She's Having: The Jewish Deli," a show that's both delightfully fun and deeply meaningful.

The exhibition examines the important role of the Jewish deli through the immigrant experience, during World War II, as a refuge for Holocaust survivors, in pop culture and today. It's on view through April 2, 2023 at the historical society on the Upper West Side.

Advertising
  • Museums
  • Fashion and costume

Admire nearly 130 outfits ranging from haute couture pieces to stage costumes, alongside custom accessories, sketches, videos, images by leading fashion photographers, and spectacular installations that mirror the approach of fashion visionary Thierry Mugler.

Brooklyn Museum's Thierry Mugler: Couturissime explores the fascinating, edgy universe of the French designer. Mugler established himself as one of the most daring and innovative designers of the late twentieth century through bold silhouettes and unorthodox techniques and materials, including glass, Plexiglas, vinyl, latex, and chrome.

The exhibition isn't just a visual treat—it also brings in the sense of smell. An expanded section dedicated to fragrance centers on Mugler’s trailblazing scent Angel.

  • Comedy

This is the only stand-up comedy show in a Brooklyn Boathouse, boasting some of the best local talent for free on the shore of the Gowanus Canal. Cuba Libre BYOB but beer, seltzers and non-alcoholic beverages are available for donation. Go see it every Friday night; check the group's Instagram for the weekly lineup.

Advertising
  • Sports and fitness
  • Sports & Fitness

After two years of outdoor play, Carreau Club, the nation’s first pétanque bar has expanded with an indoor location with more space to get your game on while sipping a drink.

The new indoor venue is now open at Brooklyn's Industry City, just in time for chillier fall temperatures. For the uninitiated, pétanque (pronounced puh-TONK) is a bocce-ball style French boules sport gaining popularity in the U.S., starting here in NYC.

Carreau Club operates primarily as a walk-in pétanque club and reservations are not required. But you can book a court in advance for a single party or multiple courts for larger groups. Reservations cost $50/court/hour.

  • Art

When you appreciate the greenspaces around NYC, do you ever stop to think about the people who make those spaces so enjoyable? Artist Fanny Allié hopes you do, and her new sculpture exhibition called Shadows brings those park workers to the forefront.

The mixed-media artist created 10 colorful sculptures inspired by the workers who maintain Bella Abzug Park (542 W 36th St.). To create the sculptures, Allié spent time with each person and asked them to pose in a manner that reflected themselves. She captured their poses on film, drew their outlines and translated them into steel silhouettes. Each worker chose their sculpture’s color.

Head to the park to see the sculptures sometime before September 2023.

Advertising
  • Music
  • Music

Hip-hop was born in the Bronx, and a new exhibit is celebrating the genre. It's led by The Universal Hip Hop Museum, which is currently under construction and slated to open in 2024 at Bronx Point. 

Until the museum opens, it's made a temporary home at Bronx Terminal Market just across the street from the construction site. There, the museum's [R]Evolution of Hip Hop exhibit is on view through the summer of 2023 at the market exploring the genre from 1986-1990, known as the golden era of hip-hop. The exhibit offers an interactive journey through history using artifacts, multimedia, artificial intelligence and virtual and augmented technologies.

  • Art

The title of this exhibit says it all: The Ronald S. Lauder Collection: Selections of Greek and Roman Antiquities, Medieval Art, Arms and Armor, Italian Gold-Ground and Old Master Paintings, Austrian and German Art and Design. Marvel at 500 works—many of which will be on view to the public for the first time—across two floors of Neue Galerie New York.

The pieces are from the collection of Neue Galerie’s co-founder and president, Ronald S. Lauder, each showing his penchant for the art of superb beauty, quality, and rarity. The exhibition provides a glimpse into one of the finest private collections in the world.

The show is on view through February 13, 2023.

Advertising
  • Sports and fitness
  • Sports & Fitness

The iconic Wollman Rink in Central Park is open for the season.

Since it opened in the 1950s, the rink at the southern end of Central Park has delighted locals and visitors alike who cherish skating under the stars with the backdrop of the city's skyline. To get in on the fun, general admission tickets range from $15 to $35 for adults, depending on date of entry; children and senior tickets cost $10 all season. You can rent skates for $10. Tickets are on sale now.

Here's what to expect at the rink this year.

Advertising
  • Shopping
  • Sample sales

New York City is a shopping mecca, and not just because some of the world’s most prominent brands operate brick-and-mortar shops here. 

In an effort to help you on your quest to a fuller closet without having to spend all your savings on it, we hereby compile a constantly updated list of the best sample sales in NYC this week. You'll always be in-the-know when it comes to discounted clothing and furniture.

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

The "best pizzeria in the world" turns into an Italian coffee shop on Saturday mornings. Orchard Street restaurant Una Pizza Napoletana becomes a breakfast destination dubbed Caffè Napoletana on Saturday mornings from 9am to 1pm—espresso for all!

Advertising
  • Art
  • Art

The energy in INTER_, Manhattan’s newest art experience, feels more like a meditation retreat than a typical gallery—and that’s by design. 

The experiential, multi-sensory museum which opened in Soho this month, invites visitors into a heightened state of contemplative awareness through a sound bath, light installations and aspects of meditation all combined with interactive digital art. 

Here's a sneak peek inside the museum — and if you want to check it out yourself, Time Out readers get a discount on tickets with code TIMEOUT15.

  • Theater
  • Circuses & magic

AirOtic Soiree is bringing the heat to Hell's Kitchen with a 21+ cabaret-style performane showcasing incredible aerial acrobatics in a titillating, sensual style. The show takes audiences through an intense story of love, passion, sexuality and eroticism through an immersive circus and cabaret experience including extravagant costumes, seductive choreography and circus artistry. 

During the show, dine on dinner and decadent dessert towers curated by celebrity chef Saul Montiel. Before and after the performance, cocktails will be available for purchase.

See it at HK Hall, a historic venue with striking decor in the heart of Hell’s Kitchen, with performances through 2023. 

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Even folks who have never been to Paris have probably heard of the iconic French café and tea house, Angelina, known for its decadent hot chocolate and Mont Blanc dessert (originally created in the Piedmont region of Italy, the treat is made with sweetened chestnut purée vermicelli topped with whipped cream).

French restaurant L'Avenue, found inside of fashion mecca Saks, is now treating customers to Angelina’s delicious offerings on this side of the Atlantic, operating a special pop-up that will stay open through December.

  • Things to do

If you're not a paint and sip kind of person, try Act & Sip, a beer-fueled acting workshop in an Off-Broadway Theater with expert instructors. They pair students off with partners and hand over the pages to a scene from a well-known iconic NYC sitcom or movie, offering tips along the way to help performers conquer stage fright and discover their inner actor. This event is perfect for bachelorette parties, after-work outings, or just a fun night with friends to get on stage with a little help from liquid courage. You don't need any experience, but you must be 21 or older and BYOB.

Upcoming event dates are on January 28; February 4, 11, 18 and 25. 

Advertising
  • Art
  • Contemporary art

What is art anyway? And what's behind hierarchies within the art world?

A self-declared laboratory for experimentation, Just Above Midtown (JAM) was an art gallery running from 1974 until 1986 where Black art flourished—and it encouraged artists and visitors to ask those very questions. "Just Above Midtown: Changing Spaces," a new exhibit at MoMA will commemorate the history of the gallery as a hub for conceptual art, abstraction, performance, and video.

The MoMA show will presents artists and artworks previously shown at JAM through archival photos, videos, and other contextual historical material, along with performances, film screenings, public programs, and an exhibition catalogue co-published with The Studio Museum in Harlem.

Just Above Midtown runs at MoMA through February 18, 2023.

  • Art
  • Meatpacking District

This week, the Whitney Museum of American Art is offering a glimpse into the NYC that renowned painter Edward Hopper portrayed in his works, such as “Automat” (1927), “Early Sunday Morning” (1930), “Room in New York” (1932), “New York Movie” (1939), “Morning Sun” (1952) and others.

“Edward Hopper’s New York,” which is now on view through March 5, 2023, will showcase more than 200 paintings watercolors, prints, and drawings from the Whitney’s collection as well as loans from public and private collections, and archival materials including printed ephemera, correspondence, photographs, and notebooks. These works serve as a record of a changing city.

Advertising
  • Art
  • Art

The New York Public Library dug through its expansive and centuries-spanning archive to stage an impressive free exhibition filled with cultural artifacts. "The Polonsky Exhibition of New York Public Library’s Treasures" spans 4,000 years of history and includes a wide range of history-making pieces, including the only surviving letter from Christoper Columbus announcing his “discovery” of the Americas to King Ferdinand’s court and the first Gutenberg Bible brought over to the Americas.

New treasures were just added to the exhibit this fall, including a signed, first edition copy of "Passing" by Nella Larsen, a selection of manuscript pages from "The Waste Land" by T.S. Eliot, and a miniature early 19th-century Qur’an, produced in Turkey.

  • Art
  • Art

A hefty, both in form and in function, new piece of art will take up residence on Governors Island this weekend.

"Moving Chains," by Charles Gaines, is a giant, 110-foot-tall kinetic sculpture featuring sturdy chains that rotate overhead. The monument "addresses the reality of systemic racism in the United States of America through embodied and visual experience and provides critical historical context on our extraordinary political division today."

The new project is the island's largest public art commission to date and you can see it through June 2023. It's presented in partnership with Times Square Arts.

Advertising
  • Art
  • Art

Pop quiz: Who’s the world’s first author?

Nope, it's not Homer. It's not a man at all. 

A new exhibit at The Morgan pays tribute to that trailblazing author, a woman named Enheduanna, a high priestess and poet, the world’s first author known by name, who wielded considerable religious and political power. The exhibition, called “She Who Wrote: Enheduanna and Women of Mesopotamia, ca. 3400–2000 B.C.” is on view at the museum in Manhattan’s Murray Hill.

Ancient sculptures, reliefs and cuneiform tablets bring to life women’s experiences in religious, social, economic, and political spheres—and much of it rings familiar today. 

Here's our full report on the exhibit, open through February 19, 2023.

  • Things to do

In an artistic representation of heroism and heart, the late photographer Jill Freedman lived among the firefighers in the Bronx and Harlem for more than a year in the 1970s as she chronicled their work. Now, her images are on display at The New York City Fire Museum.

The exhibition features a number of images contained in Freedman’s book, Firehouse, which was released in 1977 and garnered rave reviews highlighting their honesty and grit that captured the danger, tragedy, heroism and camaraderie of being a firefighter in New York City. The images in the exhibition include close-ups of the firefighters, action shots at the scene of a fire and more.

See "Firehouse: The Photography of Jill Freedman" through April 2, 2023. 

Advertising
  • Things to do
  • City Life

Residential Rising: Lower Manhattan since 9/11,” the Skyscraper Museum’s newest exhibition, analyzes and visualizes how the neighborhood's population has more than doubled since 2001.

The exhibit features stunningly detailed scale models of the city's tall wonders and digs into the history of the area. 

See “Residential Rising: Lower Manhattan since 9/11” at The Skyscraper Museum (39 Battery Place, Battery Park City) before the show ends in January 2023. Admission is free, with timed tickets required

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

The immersive experience trend continues strong with Wonderland Dreams, a newly announced interactive wine bar loosely inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The cultural offering is now open in midtown Manhattan at 529 Fifth Avenue by 44th Street running through late April 2023.

The venue, which boasts 20 different rooms filled with eye-catching sights, sounds pretty remarkable. The 26,000-square-foot space has been hand-painted, there's a living art gallery that quite literally puts visitors inside a picture frame, a secret rose garden, giant playing cards and color-changing drinks.

Tickets for Wonderland Dreams are available for purchase right here.

Advertising
  • Things to do

Head back in time at the Fraunces Tavern Museum to explore how George Washington became a pop culture icon over the years. Our first president's persona has been showcased in comics, pop culture, and other appearances alongside figures like Superman and Captain America. Dig into those depictions through the newly opened exhibition "Cloaked Crusader: George Washington in Comics and Pop Culture."

  • Things to do
  • Weird & Wonderful

Part visual splendor, part olfactory wonder and part ooey-gooey sensory fun, Sloomoo Institute’s slime museum re-opened this fall after a renovation. This captivating playground welcomes all ages to its home in SoHo—or “SooHoo,” in Sloomoo parlance (see what they did there?).

Here are five things not to miss at Sloomoo, including a chance to get slimed and a DIY slime making activity.

Advertising
  • Nightlife
  • Nightlife

Have some fun this weekend and go check out Gamehaus, a giant new arcade and beer hall just opened in Long Island City. This 5,000-square-foot multifunctional space features a dozen large-screen TVs, classic video games and loads of beers.

Classice arcade games include Atari Pong, Ms. Pacman, Jurassic Park, Pop-a-Shot and Skee Ball. 

  • Nightlife
  • Nightlife

A new nightlife venue called Deluxx Fluxx has taken over the former Studio at Webster Hall location, a 4,200-square-foot space beneath the famed music venue in the East Village, inspired by early arcades, punk rock, hip-hop and graffiti culture.

The venue brings "an immersive visual and audial art space and arcade" that promises to reinvigorate the artist-centric venues that defined New York City nightlife in the early 2000s. Part interactive art project and part performance venue, expect live entertainment, DJs, pinball machines, "artfully weird" video games, custom video work, costumed performers, floor-to-ceiling blacklight art interiors and a day-glo design palette. Some of the arcade games offer their own New York City flair, like Crown Heights King where pigeons battle to be the king of the neighborhood.

Here's more about the nightlife venue.

Advertising
  • Things to do
  • City Life

Still working on that screenplay? Say goodbye to writer's block (hopefully) at Soho's newest coffee shop and creative space.

The Lost Draft, a newly opened film-inspired multipurpose space at 398 Broome Street (between Mulberry Street and Cleveland Place) promises to be a refuge for those eager to finally get those creative ideas on paper. Or on screen. 

Stop procrastinating and start writing, because The Lost Draft is open seven days a week from 7am-9pm, offering plenty of time to be creative. Here's our full story on the new cafe.

  • Art
  • Art

Immersive art experiences in New York are getting the royal treatment with the new Hall des Lumières, the city's latest permanent center for custom-designed immersive events at the historic Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank by City Hall.

The new is hosting a show on the iconic Austrian painter Gustav Klimt. Tickets to "Gustav Klimt: Gold in Motion" are on sale right here with dates through March 2023.

Given the magnitude of the new cultural center, you'd be remiss not to snag passes to the show right away but, just in case you need some other reasons to check out the space, we've got a few to share

Advertising
  • Art
  • Sculpture

Marvel at the sculptures by artist Hew Locke placed on the exterior of The Met. The gold-hued sculptures are part of the museum's third facade commission series. Three sculpture sit tucked into niches at the museum's facade into the likeness of trophies, two partial and two whole, that reference works of art in The Met collection. "At once visually stunning and critically incisive, Locke’s practice relies on the strategy of appropriation and an aesthetic of excess and theatricality to deconstruct iconographies of power and to explore global histories of conquest, migration, and exchange," The Met says.

Locke was born Scotland and raised in Guyana, a multiracial, multicultural nation in South America that was formed in the crucible of indigeneity, European colonialism, the African slave trade, and Indian indentureship. 

The Facade Commission: Hew Locke, Gilt is now on view outside of the musuem through May 22, 2023. 

  • Art
  • East Harlem

"Food in New York: Bigger Than the Plate" at the Museum of the City of New York explores the relationship between New Yorkers and food, using the venue's back terrace as an exhibition space for the first time. 

“Behind every tempting package of processed food at the corner bodega; every carton of fresh berries from a street cart; and every enticing restaurant meal lies an intricate, massive and changing network of relationships,” reads an official press release about the indoor/outdoor show, which is slated to run through the fall of 2023.

Visitors will get to browse through over 20 works by contemporary artists and designers that were tasked with using their respective crafts to come up with solutions to key global and local food-related challenges.

Advertising
  • Art
  • Sculpture
  • Upper East Side

Stand next to a new 18-foot-tall patinated bronze sculpture called Ancestor at the southeast entrance to Central Park. The colossal artwork depicts a universal mother figure linking our cultural and personal pasts and futures. Adorned with the heads of her 23 children that extend from her body, she embodies multiculturalism, pluralism, and interconnectedness. They manifest a sense of belonging and celebrate the mother as a keeper of wisdom and the eternal source of creation and refuge.

Ancestor is by New Delhi and London-based artist Bharti Kher, and the exhibition is presented by the Public Art Fund. 

See Ancestor for free at Doris C. Freedman Plaza through August 27, 2023. 

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Brooklyn vinyl lovers are in luck because the Brooklyn Public Library’s Central Library has just opened a Vinyl Lending Library to its cardholders, giving them access to 400 albums spanning genres (hip-hop, pop, classical, country, show tunes and more) that they can listen to on-site as well as borrow for up to three weeks. You just need your library card. Listening stations can be found on the first floor.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Eating

A former Cold Stone Creamery employee has mastered the specific art of throwing ice cream in the air and catching it with scoopers before serving it to customers. Now, he has decided to turn his art into a brick-and-mortar business with CATCH’N Ice Cream at his new shop in SoHo at 65 Bleecker Street. Customers can expect the staffers at CATCH'N to chop, fold and throw the treat (with toppings!) before serving it in a cup. Interestingly enough, the balls of ice cream will be pre-scooped by a dedicated machine, so the spotlight will really fall on the acrobatics after a customer places an order.

  • Art
  • Art

ArtsDistrict Brooklyn, also referred to as AD/BK, is a new immersive arts venue set that opens this week. To celebrate the opening of the venue, sure to become part and parcel of New York’s larger devotion to all things experiential, AD/BK will host the U.S. premiere of Limitless AI, a 70-minute show that first debuted at the Atelier des Lumières museum in Paris. Two other shows will be mounted on premise simultaneously: Flight and Séance. Both created by London-based company Darkfield, the two immersive, audio experiences will be presented in complete darkness inside customized 40-foot shipping containers. How cool!

Advertising
  • Art
  • Battery Park City

A new exhibition at the Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, "Survivors: Faces of Life after the Holocaust," features 75 close-up portraits of Holocaust survivors photographed by award-winning photographer Martin Schoeller. 

The images showcase Schoeller's signature style, with the subjects gazing intensely at the viewer, revealing the struggles, pains and resilience that have defined them throughout the years. 

Each photo is paired with a biography and the exhibition will also feature behind-the-scenes video footage documenting the actual shots, which were taken at Yad Vashem, Israel's official memorial to the victims of the Holocaust.

The exhibit is on display in the museum's rotunda on the third floor, which was just recently named after Holocaust survivor Rita Lowenstein, through June 18, 2023.

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

There's a roving cat robot that sings, tells jokes and serves food at Dimmer & Summer, a new dim sum spot in Cobble Hill at 196 Smith Street between Baltic and Warren Streets. Opened by restaurateur Kenny Mei this past weekend as an homage to his Chinese roots, Dimmer & Summer offers traditional Northern and Southern Chinese dishes with a New York flair (like the robo-cat server, of course). It works. There’s just something about robots serving you delicious fare that excites us just so.

Advertising
  • Art
  • Central Park

Get a closer look at more than 60 kimonos at the Met Museum that will show how these traditional Japanese garments transformed over their history. Across the gallery, these gorgeous kimonos will be paired along with Western garments, Japanese paintings, prints, and decorative art objects in thematic and chronological order, from the costumes worn for Japan’s traditional forms of theater, Noh and KyĹŤgen, to the western-influence of the second half of the 20th century.

  • Things to do
  • City Life

Portside, Brookfield Place's second seasonal waterfront pop-up, is officially open for business now through September and its on-site schedule of activities and programs looks incredibly fun. From 9am through 9pm daily, the free and open-to-the-public outpost will look like a nautical-inspired oasis complete with beautiful views of the New York Harbor. You can see the full roster of events right here, but we'd be remiss not to mention some standouts, including the beach read book club, which will offer participants a complimentary library of free books (one per person!). You can also sip on champagne while learning how to shuck oysters from professionals that belong to Red Oyster USA, enjoy an outdoor dance party, create a monogrammed beach tote that you'll likely use for the rest of the summer and partake in a seashell crafts hour. Outdoor seatings for groups of any size plus food and beverage options from Tartinery round out the awesome experience.

 

Advertising
  • Things to do
  • City Life

Superstorm Sandy devastated New York City, destroying homes and businesses, but it also flooded the New York Aquarium so badly that parts of it have been closed to the public for the past decade. Now, after completely rebuilding these galleries with help from FEMA, New York State and New York City, NY Aquarium is open in full—you can see all of it—"Spineless," the PlayQuarium, "Ocean Wonders: Sharks!" Glover’s Reef, the Conservation Hall, the Sea Cliffs, the Aquatheater, the Seaside Café and more.

  • Things to do
  • City Life

The Museum of the Moving Image's "Living with The Walking Dead" features original costumes and props, concept art, storyboards, scripts and prosthetic makeup material that highlight the show’s origins, production and impact.

t'll also has multiple screening series and public events over a six-month span for those interested in the show and learning more about behind the scenes. All in all, there are 500 objects including more than 300 props and production materials to see. 

Advertising
  • Things to do
  • City Life

A bucolic 1920s English country golf club is on its way to NYC's concrete jungle! But with a twist. Swingers NoMad, a "crazy mini-golf course" and entertainment complex straight from London brought with it three nine-hole golf courses across 23,000 square feet under 20-foot-high ceilings.

"Crazy golf" is a British spin on mini-golf, but it's for a 21-and-over audience since craft cocktails are served by caddies on the course, and at Swingers NoMad, there will be six cocktail bars with signature classic cocktails from London and D.C., as well as 12 cocktails created specifically for Swingers NoMad, private rooms you can rent, an opulent clubhouse and four gourmet street food vendors—Sauce Pizzeria, Miznon, Fonda and Mah Ze Dahr Bakery.

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Magic Hour Rooftop Bar & Lounge's entry to its adjacent Elephant Room has been rechristened The Hidden Gem, has been polished into a new point among the constellation of NYC’s latter-day speakeasy conceits. Cloistered from Magic Hour’s skyline view outside, The Hidden Gem is past a double set of pink doors. A bouquet of disco balls is arranged overhead with more on tables at curved leather banquettes and on the bar, which is also appointed with blooms and greenery.

Its lighting is appropriately dim and its lines are sleek, in contrast to the characteristically Instagrammable cocktails like the bright red Cloud Nine with prosecco, cotton candy and a glitter rim and the Sex Panther with rum, pineapple, punch, lime and coconut cream, served in a vessel that mirrors the fruit, and copiously garnished. Both of those cocktails, and four more new additions, are available exclusively in The Hidden Gem, which is open Wednesday-Sunday from 3pm-12am. 

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

The latest entrant to the speakeasy-theme scene, this Times Square spot offers a sexy 1980s vibe. The Woo Woo aims to evoke that last decade before widespread internet, its surrounding neighborhood of Times Square in those same, pre-Disney days, sex shops and, the reason for the season, speakeasies.

These themes are executed with a combination of graffiti that reasonably approximates the style of the time, vintage nude mags and video tapes, rouge neon, throwback punk show posters and the whole password thing. Drinks include odes to the era like the Donkey Kong cocktail and a Prince-inspired tipple with a butterfly pea flower “purple rain” ice cube. They’re also doing a cotton candy-topped cosmo and snacks like sliders and spring rolls. The sex shop elements are ornamental at the moment, but may turn retail in the future. 

  • Things to do
  • Markets and fairs

The Brooklyn Flea is undoubtedly one of the most popular flea markets to hit in NYC if you're looking for the best selection of throwback wares and records, which you certainly wouldn’t find in just any vintage clothing store or record store in the city.

The food selection is also top-notch since the creators also operate one of the city’s best food markets: Smorgasburg

The Brooklyn Flea DUMBO is now open. Brooklyn Flea also operates in Chelsea year-round on Saturdays and Sundays, 8am-5pm, and the new Hester Flea on Saturdays, 11am-6pm.

Advertising
  • Nightlife
  • Nightlife

It's not every day that a new nightclub opens in New York City, especially one that harks back to an old sort of New York—when nightclubs were the city's premiere destinations for some after-hours fun. Which is why Daphne, a new subterranean spot under Hotel 50 Bowery in Chinatown, is so special. Upon entering the massive 2,500-square-foot space, patrons are pleasantly surprised to find a beautiful silk pink flower installation by art studio Floratorium. Dazzling disco balls also permeate the premises, calling back to a time when the dance club you frequented was just as important as where your apartment was located. 

  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Kitsby, a dessert shop in Brooklyn, has a new menu item that will surely entice you to visit Williamsburg, where the shop is located. Dubbed The Kit, the signature offering is a tray of bites that represents "second generation baking." Consider it Kitsby's very own Asian American spin on afternoon tea. 

The tray, which costs $38 per person or $70 for two people, comes with ten sweet and savory pastries. These include a black sesame financier, a five-spice shortbread, an asiago lop cheong roule, a mocha mousse cake plus a slew of other bite-sized treats. You'll also get to choose one entrée to go with your order. 

Advertising
  • Comedy
  • Gowanus

Looking for a treat? Head to Ample Hills' Gowanus Scoop Shop rooftop for a comedy show hosted by Savannah DesOrmeaux (X Change Rate) and Jenny Gorelick (NY Comedy Festival) featuring a heavily female, queer, and non-binary line-up on select Fridays. Pizza and ice cream will be available for purchase at the show.

Furry Fridays at the AKC Museum of the Dog
Photograph: Courtesy AKC Museum of the Dog

88. Furry Fridays at the AKC Museum of the Dog

Bring your dog to the AKC Museum of the Dog at these special after-hours events called Furry Fridays hosted on select Fridays. Tickets are $20 per person and $5 per dog.

The Museum of the Dog has more than 180 sculptures and paintings of four-legged furballs as well as a “Meet the Breeds” table, which provides info on all 193 AKC recognized dog breeds, and other interactive fun.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Hell's Kitchen

Dinner at Mari’s high-gloss, muted-hued chefs counter or in the comfortable dining room beyond starts with a beautiful hansang. Clockwise to the center: An opaque acorn jelly, oyster with makgeolli mignonette, eggplant jeon (on a skewer like an insider wink to Kochi), Wagyu tartare and a sensational sphere of one or two-bite crispy egg rice, best tasted in that order.  It’s real "kid in a candy store" stuff, all exquisitely executed save for maybe one too many drops of sauce on the tartare, which almost obscures that inimitable beef flavor that people pay a premium for. Each element’s expert preparation and presentation would be notable on their own. Combined in this tantalizing fashion, they articulate the abundance to come and easily establish Mari’s quickly earned best-of status.

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

In the micro category of subway bars–pour houses adjacent to the otherwise dry MTA–Nothing Really Matters is the latest from Adrien Gallo, whose previous endeavors included Double Happiness and Grand Banks.

It’s located between the entrance and the turnstile in the downtown-bound 1 train station at 50th Street and Broadway. The facade is adorned in signs for the newsstand and barbershop that previously operated in the station’s small retail areas. An illustrated haircut legend is still on display. Trash is strewn about. It looks like a subway station from 1984’s Ghostbusters

Inside, the long oak bar is backed by rows of bottles lit from below, illuminated like a boozy skyline snapshot. There’s a disco ball in the corner and the bathroom is covered in glitter wallpaper. Cocktails like the Empire State (vodka, maple, spiced apple, lemon), Knickerbocker bramble (bourbon, rosemary-blueberry compote, lemon) and the Time Out (Jamaican hibiscus, ginger, soda) are named in nods to New York. Classics, low- and no-ABV options are all on the menu.

Advertising
  • Music
  • Music

There is something about the talent of musicians in uptown Manhattan that simply cannot be authentically replicated in other New York neighborhoods—and the folks at the Cloak Room, a jazz speakeasy in Hamilton Heights, know that.

The Cloak Room has taken over the space previously occupied by Hogshead Tavern, which permanently closed during the pandemic. Using the lockdown as an opportunity to re-invent, Hogshead Tavern co-owners Tara Wholley and Ady De Luna decided to move away from the structure of the bar that had become a neighborhood favorite and instead honor the musical legacy of Harlem by opening a spot dedicated to jazz.

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Overthrow Hospitality—the group behind New York favorites Amor y Amargo, Ladybird and Death and Co., among others—have debuted an attention-grabbing champagne and absinthe bar in the East Village that is inspired by... hell. 

Café de L’Enfer literally translates to "hell cafe" from the French. The decor is just as striking as the cocktails, developed by mixologist Sother Teague. The destination, which calls out to the famous Victorian-era Cabaret de l'Enfer in Paris, is filled with touches of the underworld. Expect skulls, deep red booths and ogre-like statues to adorn the dark space, located directly above Amor y Amargo.

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Eating

Dumpling Lab, founded by Hunan Slurp's Chef Xiaomei Ma and partners Chao Wang and Lu Dong, brings even more contemporary Chinese food to the East Village with its new seafood-focused menu, inspired by the Chinese city of Tsingtao. Mackerel Dumplings made with Spanish mackerel, pork, chive and dried shellfish are a menu standout. To embrace the diversity of Tsingtao's culinary culture, Ma also added dumpling flavors like organic chicken dumplings with wood ear and corn, plus zucchini and cucumber dumplings with eggs and vermicelli.

  • Things to do
  • Chelsea

The Rubin Museum is offering a unique exhibit that delves into the power of difficult emotions and how to turn them into positive ones—something many of us would benefit from these days. On the third floor of the museum, the Mandala Lab uses fun and interactive tools to explore jealousy/envy, attachment, pride, anger and ignorance and shows visitors how to turn them into wisdom of accomplishment, discernment, equanimity, mirror-like wisdom and all-accommodating wisdom, respectively. How this is done is through four quadrants across the floor, based on the Sarvavid Vairochana Mandala, a Tibetan Buddhist mandala that is used as a visualization tool to help achieve enlightenment. Each quadrant represents an emotion and has a playful activity to navigate it, including a "gong orchestra," a "breathing alcove" and a "scent library."

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Great Jones Distilling Co. opened as Manhattan's first and only legal whiskey distillery in over 100 years. Over six years in the making, the 28,000 square foot venue features a fully functioning distillery, a tasting room and several drinking and dining venues, including an underground speakeasy and full restaurant to open this fall.

The menus are heralded by Executive Chef Adam Raksin, who formerly worked at Per SeVisitors can book several different experiences, including a tour detailing the whiskey making process ($35), a culinary cocktail pairing experience ($145) and a hands-on mixology class ($110). The craft whiskey made at Great Jones starts with grains sourced exclusively from New York state. Exclusive bourbon and rye is available only at the distillery. 

  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Roosevelt Island has its first-ever rooftop bar and lounge open to the public. Panorama Room is nestled atop the Graduate Roosevelt Island hotel on the southern end of the island. and the views are really unparalleled—perhaps even the best of any rooftop lounge.

Located on the 18th floor of the hotel, the "jewel box" space by Med Abrous and Marc Rose, who are food and beverage partners of the hotel and co-founders of the hospitality group Call Mom, opens up to incredible views of the boroughs, the bridges and the East River, which shine like stars at night. 

Its palatial vibes are set by luxurious velvet vintage-inspired tubular lounge sofas, chrome and marble touches, mosaic tile columns and its giant, tubular acrylic chandeliers that hover above the massively long bar. It's not only luxe but it's somehow simultaneously futuristic and retro. 

Advertising
  • Restaurants
  • Drinking

Ms. Kim's, a K-town karaoke lounge from Korean beauty entrepreneur Anna Kim, combines sophisticated style with sing-alongs. Envisioned during the pandemic, when we all just needed to belt out our frustrations, and spend some much-needed time outside of our homes with friends, Ms. Kim's offers both communal space and soundproof private karaoke rooms, so guests can customize their experience as it suits their needs.

In the main lounge and bar, mixologist-approved cocktails take the place of the ubiquitous karaoke bar beer pitcher. Ingredients in the signature drinks, which start at $16, include butterfly pea flower, herbal infused syrups and top shelf spirits. Fine wine is sold by the glass or bottle, and beer is available on tap or by the bottle. For soju, the 46-proof Hwayo - 23° is available by the 375 mL bottle. Fridays will also bring live music to the bar, for those who prefer to sway to the sounds of jazz, rather than sing. To eat, Ms. Kim's offers a short menu of Japanese and Korean finger foods, like vegetable or shrimp tempura with four types of salt, three types of fried dumplings, and chicken karaage with garlic ginger soy sauce.  

  • Art
  • Painting
  • Harlem

This adults-only painting party experience in West Harlem and the Lower East Side offers a chance to make your own masterpiece. Pick up a paint brush with cocktail in hand (like the Picasso Punch or the Sistine Apple) and see what you can create.

If you're hungry, no worries, Paint 'N Pour also has small plates (shrimp po’boy sliders, orange bbq henny wings, cauliflower bites, bacon egg and cheese slidersfrench toast and chicken 'n waffle sliders). Tickets are $50 and include all art supplies and a 2-hour open bar. 

Advertising
  • Things to do
  • Lower East Side
Sour Mouse offers games like ping pong, pool and foosball, live music, comedy and art shows for the New Yorker looking for a fun night out. Check its Instagram for its weekly events, from ping pong speed dating to mixers with live music, and regular art openings. Starting this Thursday, Indie 184's work "Electromagnetic" will be showcased.

 

More things to do in NYC this weekend

Advertising
  • Things to do
  • Walks and tours

Instead of spending all your cash in a city where rent takes so much money anyway, we’ve come up with 10 foolproof things to do in NYC that are guaranteed to spark more joy than a cashmere sweater. Yes, even if it’s 50 percent off! Trust us—no discounts or deals can compare to the memories you’ll make at these New York attractions and top NYC art museums.

The 50 best things to do in NYC for locals and tourists
  • Things to do

 

Every day, our staffers are eating, drinking, partying, gigging and generally appreciating their way throughout this fair town of ours. Which makes pinning down the most essential New York activities kinda…tough. We need to include the classics, naturally—art museums in NYC, stellar New York attractions, killer bars and restaurants in NYC—but also spotlight the more recent or little-known gems that we truly love. Consider the below your NYC Bible.

Recommended
    You may also like
    You may also like
    Advertising

    The best things in life are free.

    Get our free newsletter – it’s great.

    Loading animation
    DĂ©jĂ  vu! We already have this email. Try another?

    🙌 Awesome, you're subscribed!

    Thanks for subscribing! Look out for your first newsletter in your inbox soon!