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The best things to do this week in NYC

Find the biggest and best events, activities and things to do in New York City this week, as chosen by Time Out's editors

Photograph: Joan Marcus
Hamilton

Smorgasburg

Recommended

The epicurean extravaganza returns to the great outdoors, with Saturdays in East River State Park and Sundays in Prospect Park. More than 75 vendors from Kings County and beyond sell food and drink as varied as oysters, artisanal sodas, gluten-free baked goods and caramel apples. 

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East River State Park , Williamsburg Saturday August 27 2016 - Saturday October 1 2016

Bushwick Flea

Recommended

Tired of all the tourists snatching the best retro threads at well-known fleas before you even have a chance to dig? Bushwick Flea joined the area’s market scene last year, and a few vendors from Brooklyn Flea sell their goods, so you can sift through their prime loot and avoid the masses. Other sellers run the gamut from Julie's Vintage and Zingara Vintage as well as antiques and collectibles by Dave. Bonus: There's live music every Sunday! 

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Bushwick Flea , Bushwick Until Wednesday November 30 2016

Fun Home

Recommended

Alison Bechdel is a cartoonist: It’s her job to fit stories into boxes. But her own life story resists easy lines. Lisa Kron and Jeanine Tesori’s Fun Home, based on Bechdel’s graphic memoir, gracefully and movingly contrasts two narratives. One is about Alison (played as an adult by Beth Malone, as a college student by Emily Skeggs and as a child by Sydney Lucas) and her nervous, joyous self-discovery as a lesbian.

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Circle in the Square , Midtown West Until Saturday September 10 2016

LIC Flea & Food

Recommended

This open-air bazaar is Queens’ answer to the Brooklyn Flea, as both markets offer a wide array of retro wares and antiques, finger-licking–delicious eats and gorgeous skyline views that could bring a tear to the eye of the most jaded New Yorker. But it certainly pays to take a train or ferry to enjoy the Flea’s all-Queens Beer and Wine Garden, serving eight beers from spots like SingleCut Beersmiths and Queens Brewery; the suds will come in handy when you need to wash down Butcher Bar’s wood-smoked BBQ and red velvet funnel cake from A Lil’ Bit of Fun. More like a Lil’ Bit of yum, right?

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LIC Flea & Food , Long Island City Saturday August 27 2016 - Sunday October 30 2016

Deep Space

Recommended

Dance-music deity François K's weekly Deep Space soiree focuses on dub in all its glorious, echo-drenched forms but extends its reach to all types of underground dance music. The only dress code is "an open mind." If that's a stretch, the evening's futuristic vibes will set the tone.

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Cielo , Meatpacking District Sunday August 28 2016 - Monday December 19 2016

Fiddler on the Roof

Recommended

Although the titans Zero Mostel, Jerome Robbins and Harold Prince are reflexively linked to this 1964 classic, there’s another, uncredited, father of Fiddler on the Roof. It’s Marc Chagall, the painter whose flying violinists inspired the title. During the development of Fiddler (when it was still called Tevye), director-choreographer Robbins approached Chagall to do the set and costumes. The artist couldn’t commit, but his spirit lingered. Now, in Bartlett Sher’s magnificent, life-affirming revival, the Chagallian gift of levitation extends not just to an airborne fiddler (in a purple coat straight out of Green Violinist) but also to the very buildings of Anatevka, which designer Michael Yeargan suspends in midair.

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Broadway Theatre , Midtown West Until Saturday December 31 2016

Hamilton

Recommended

What is left to say? After Founding Father Alexander Hamilton’s prodigious quill scratched out 12 volumes of nation-building fiscal and military policy; after Lin-Manuel Miranda turned that titanic achievement (via Ron Chernow’s 2004 biography) into the greatest American musical in decades; after every critic in town (including me) praised the Public Theater world premiere to high heaven; and after seeing this language-drunk, rhyme-crazy dynamo a second time, I can only marvel: We've used up all the damn words. Wait, here are three stragglers, straight from the heart: I love Hamilton.

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Richard Rodgers Theatre , Midtown West Until Saturday December 31 2016

School of Rock

Recommended

Ever see the pitch-perfect 2003 Jack Black comedy School of Rock? Then you know what to expect from the musical version: fake substitute teacher Dewey Finn frenetically inspiring his charges to release their inner Jimi Hendrix; uptight preppy tweens learning classic riffs; and the band’s pivotal, make-or-break gig, with their overbearing parents watching in horror. We expect cute kids in uniform, a spastic Dewey and face-melting riffs—along with heart-tugging family stuff.

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Winter Garden Theatre , Midtown West Until Saturday December 31 2016

Side Ponytail

Recommended

Carolyn Busa’s two-year-old, weekly show at Over the Eight is a reliable night for solid laughs and surprise stars. Check out sets from guests like Josh Gondelman, Carmen Lynch and Corinne Fisher at this Monday night staple. 

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Over the Eight , Williamsburg Monday August 29 2016 - Monday July 24 2017

Amy

Anyone with a beating heart will be forgiven for allowing it to break during this unflinching and thoughtful account of the life of soul singer Amy Winehouse. Moving from Winehouse’s first steps into the music business in 2001 to her death in 2011 at just 27, Amy gives equal weight to her talent and the tragedy of its loss. Smartly, the film refuses to offer easy answers to explain her demise.—Dave Calhoun 

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Ant-Man

Marvel’s smallest origin story begins with scientist Hank Pym (Douglas), the inventor of a top-secret particle capable of shrinking ordinary objects down to insect size. Ousted from his own tech company, Hank needs a skilled stooge to break into his old lab and steal some research, and sweet-natured thief Scott Lang (Rudd) is the only man for the job. Rudd is inhibited in the role, as if he felt there was too much at stake, and that impulse to play it safe typifies a film that shrinks in the face of a challenge.—David Ehrlich

 

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Black Mass

This is the entertaining, if limited, tale of how seriously nasty South Boston crime lord James “Whitey” Bulger (Depp, hiding behind terrible teeth and a bald patch) operated with near immunity from the late 1970s to the early 1990s. Bulger cut a deal with an FBI agent, childhood pal John Connolly (Edgerton), who in turn was seduced by the rewards of the thug life he was meant to be eradicating. The key relationships in the film are fatally undercooked, but it’s hard to care about that whenever Depp is onscreen—the actor is more engaging than he’s been in years.—Dave Calhoun

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The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

“We had swag,” Black Panther Party member Ericka Huggins says with a small smile in this vital,
well-organized documentary. Loaded with the militant images that grabbed worldwide media attention in the late ’60s, director Nelson’s chronicle strikes an intelligent balance between funk-scored pride and a more universal story of activism threatened by infighting and accidental celebrity.—Joshua Rothkopf

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The Diary of a Teenage Girl

Yay for this indie drama, which breaks Hollywood rules about adolescent female sexuality with Lena Dunham levels of brutal honesty (and humor). It’s the story of precocious 15-year-old Minnie (British actor Powley, terrific), growing up in 1970s San Francisco. Dangerously curious, Minnie slips into a relationship
with her mother’s boyfriend, Monroe (Skarsgård). It’s a squirm-inducing idea to build a plot around, but to the movie’s credit, the sex is dealt with sensitively, always with a woman’s perspective in mind.—Cath Clarke

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Dope

Rick Famuyiwa’s comedy follows three high-school nerds who call Los Angeles’ frightening Inglewood home. It’s a euphorically funny indie that flips the script on Boyz n the Hood.

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The End of the Tour

Reporter David Lipsky (Eisenberg) spent five days in 1996 with novelist David Foster Wallace (Segel), recording their back-and-forth over car rides and late-night junk food. Both leads are thorny and excellent, but Segel turns the film into a feast of subtle fragility.—Joshua Rothkopf

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Everest

Recommended

An unrelenting real-life disaster movie that strands you near the top of the world’s tallest mountain and dares you to imagine what it must be like to be part of an expedition that goes horribly, horribly wrong, Everest is based on an actual 1996 summit attempt that ended in tragedy. The film crosses into soppy territory when it cuts to the climbers’ nervous wives, but director Baltasar Kormákur creates such a convincing world that you’re willing to forgive its less delicate touches.-—DC


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Fantastic Four

Reed Richards (Teller) and his bulky best-pal-cum-bodyguard Ben Grimm (Bell) are set to work on the world’s first inter-dimensional teleportation device. Soon, Reed and Ben trip
off to a parallel universe in the company of similarly nerdy youngsters Sue Storm (Kate Mara) and her adopted brother Johnny (Jordan). But after an encounter with an energy force, the quartet returns with superpowers and are immediately whisked off by shady government forces.The second half is nothing more than a roundelay of superhero tics: lame catchphrases, brain-grinding exposition and lifeless action scenes, the talented cast overwhelmed by iffy special effects.—Tom Huddleston

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The Gift

Edgerton slides effortlessly behind the camera with this satisfying, smart and darkly unnerving psychological thriller in which the perfect life of a seemingly perfect couple is smashed to smithereens when they move to a new suburb and bump into an oddball who begins to turn up with creepy presents.—Daisy Bowie-Sell

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Robert Smithson, “Pop”

Though Smithson is indelibly linked to the monumental Earthworks he created in the late-’60s and early-1970s (the most iconic of which is, of course, Spiral Jetty, constructed on the shore of Utah’s Great Salt Lake in the Spring of 1970), he began the decade experimenting with all manner of styles current at the time—from Expressionistic drawings of totemic figures to Minimalist sculpture. The examples revisited in this exhibit fall somewhere in between, with works on paper featuring pop-cultural imagery (including soft-porn snippets, both homo- and heterosexual) and reliefs with a decidedly cybernetic flavor, incorporating photos, Plexiglas and metal. What unites them is an encyclopedic sensibility that would eventually distill into some of the most important artworks of the 20th century.

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Until Sun Jan 10

Pat O’Neill, “Let's Make a Sandwich”

This exhibition marks the New York debut of Pat O’Neill, a Los Angeles artist and filmmaker Little know on the East Coast, his work touches upon a number of strains of L.A. art, from the deconstructive film- and photo-collage aesthetics of Bruce Connor and Robert Heninecken (who was O’Neil’s teacher at UCLA during the early 1960s), to the “Finish Fetish” school of sculpture associated with John McCracken and Craig Kauffman and others. O’Neill’s surreal sculptural tableaux and his rapid-fire abstract films respectively reflect those influences on his efforts, surveyed here in this primer, covering his 50-year career.

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Sat Dec 12 - Sat Jan 23

Monika Baer, “On Hold”

A graduate of the famed Düsseldorf Art Academy, this German artist mixes and matches trompe l’oeil realism. Expressionism and gestural abstraction into atmospheric compositions that treat the canvas like a theatrical stage for enigmatic motifs to act out pictorial dramas.

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Until Sat Jan 16

Deborah Kass, “No Kidding”

A feminist artist who mines art history, pop culture and her own Jewish identity, Deborah Kass’s best-known works include parodies of Warhol’s “Elvis” paintings and portraits of Liz Taylor, which ironically led to a 2012 retrospective at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. Fresh off the unveiling of her public sculpture, OY/YO, at Brooklyn Bridge Park, she offers a new series of sober black-and-blue paintings adorned with ironic puns rendered in neon lettering.

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Until Sat Jan 23

Morton Bartlett, “Family Planning: Early Photographs and Archival Material”

A Harvard dropout whose life remains something of a mystery, Barlett is best known for creating a fantasy family of lifelike dolls of children ages 6 to 16, which he dressed up and posed before the camera. But he also shot other photographic subjects, including conventional images of kids, which he hoped to market. Here his signature work is presented alongside archival material to chart his development from hobbyist to outsider artist.

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Until Wed Dec 23

Comments

22 comments
Jessica R
Jessica R

Can I add one more interesting event of next week? It's Young New Yorkers Spring Diversion Program, which is the final exhibition. Briefly, It is a large-scale, participatory art project that is designed to generate a conversation around our young New Yorkers' experiences with, and hopes for, the criminal justice system. You can check the details on Mosh.us and.. you're invited! 

Michael L
Michael L

Doesn’t this New York place, ever sleep? Mike from Indiana, USA

Margo R
Margo R

Fredrick Rzewski Festival at Bargemusic! The People United Will Never Be Defeated (text by Oscar Wilde) and other chamber works. Composer in residence at the piano!

http://bargemusic.org/calendar.html



Stephen M
Stephen M

Stephen Morris, the author of WHEN BROTHERS DWELL IN UNITY: BYZANTINE CHRISTIANITY AND HOMOSEXUALITY, is reading-signing copies of the book at the Columbia university bookstore (Broadway at West 114th Street; take the #1 train to the West 116 Street subway station) on Tuesday, APril 12 at 6 p.m.

Carrie C
Carrie C

Also check out the Greenwich Village Antiquarian Book Fair - This Greenwich Village tradition draws the serious collectors as well as the curious browsers – who invariably find wonderful treasures: rare and vintage books spanning the 17th through 21st centuries, including children's series and illustrated books, modern first editions, art, photography and design, maps & prints, political flyers, unusual paper ephemera and memorabilia; also Dickensiana, paleontology, architecture, autographs, African American studies, film history and comics.

Explore the world of paper this Friday evening, Saturday & Sunday during the day - PS3, 490 Hudson Street

gvabf.com

Josh S
Josh S

@Olga L Thanks! Get a profile on Iceberg (www.iceberg.travel/meet/new-york) to meet some locals and other travellers. We love NYC!!!!!

Chris O
Chris O

Is anyone going to any of these? Possibly in Brooklyn? 

Cecily O
Cecily O

"Drinking with Dorothy" is at the Player's Theatre, Macdougal St. on June 5 & 6 at 10pm. Tickets : $12. 

Based on Dorothy Parker's stories, this in an evening of alcohol-fuelled romance and music, presented by 2Time Theatre.

Claire B
Claire B

Basque Cider House is this Sunday at Txikito! Michelin rated James Beard nominated Chefs prepare a Curated dinner highlighting Basque cultural appreciation through specially crafted Ciders and Art including projections and documentary film. Eder Montero, Alex Raij, Emily Lobsenz and Leah Rinaldi invited me to unique experience of a tradition. This Sunday, March 29th at 6, Totally worth sharing!

Mark W
Mark W

The BEST, and longest-running, Dueling Pianos show in NYC - SHAKE RATTLE & ROLL DUELING PIANOS - 10pm every Saturday night.  All request rock n roll party.  Part concert, part cabaret, part comedy - all fun!


The Cellar @ 22 Warren St. NYC 10007

www.ShakeRattleRollPianos.com for tix and info!

Beatrice B
Beatrice B

Have to see Queen. Lambert is no impersonator! I saw them in Chicago and again in Vegas, now MSG. This show deserves a 4 star !!! That if you like great music and a front man with an amazing voice and commands the stage. Its like hearing Queen for the first time . Go see this show, if you can get seats !

Blair Y
Blair Y

how about the Spike Lee block party in Brooklyn...