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The best Japanese restaurants in Sydney

If you are looking for a Japanese culinary experience in Sydney, these are the best of the lot

Photograph: Anna Kucera

Japanese food fits into the Sydney climate like soybeans fit into their little pods. And so it’s good that, thanks to all of the incredible Japanese chefs gracing our shores, we know how to do it right. From the sushi roll lunch-run to the full sashimi-laden dego, here’s where to do Japanese in Sydney.

Want more? Check out Sydney's best ramen.

The best Japanese restaurants in Sydney

Sokyo

When ​this glitzy, casino-based Japanese restaurant first opened a couple of years back, we dismissed it as rich kid disco sushi – big flavours and easy​-​to​-​understand hand rolls that still taste good after a sweaty session with Redfoo at Marquee. But if it was once true, now it ain’t necessarily so. There’s more going on here than first meets the chopstick. Chefs Chase Kojima commands the most impressive sushi counter in Sydney. The only challenge is landing a seat. 

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Darling Harbour

Tetsuya's

A world class dining experience that leaves the rest for dead. A 12-course tasting menu can start with anything from fresh oysters to spanner crab custard with parsely oil then work all the way through to the most tender, rich wagyu beef and slices of stunning raw fish. Unsurpassed ingredients, outstanding service and you can even BYO.

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Sydney

Cho Cho San

Behind the scenes at Cho Cho San you'll find Sydney’s dining dream team. Ex-Billy Kwong, Bodega and Rockpool chef Nic Wong heads up the kitchen with help from Jonathan Barthelmess, who co-owns the joint with Sam Christie. The menu is pared-back with a Japanese feel. Inspired by the izakayas of Japan, where Barthelmess and Christie have both spent a good deal of time, it has plenty of snacks, raw options and meats cooked over coals, and the drinks list is as impressive as the food. 

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Potts Point
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Chaco Bar

You want heart pipes? Liver? Gizzards? Gristle? They’ve got 'em, along with plenty more protein that isn’t quite so gutsy. The meats are grilled over white charcoal and served over piles of roughly chopped raw white cabbage. By the time you’re done with your juicy, salty chicken thigh or crisp folds of strangely sweet chicken skin, that cabbage will have turned into a well-seasoned side of its own. On Monday evenings and lunch times you'll big bowls of ramen and also make sure you ourder the sizzling gyoza. 

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Darlinghurst

Gumshara

Chef Dan Hong calls this ramen 'The Chronic' and after the first spoonful, you'll know what he means. You'll find the stall at the far end of the Eating World. There's no phone number, no menu except what's on the board. It takes seven days to make the pork stock for the tonkotsu ramen and three ingredients: water, miso and 120kg of pork bones. This incredibly collagen enriched noodle soup is so thick, rich and porky that one between two is enough. Yowza.

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Haymarket

Tokonoma

In Sydney we’ve grown accustomed to speedy Japanese food – sushi rolls for lunch; gyoza snacks; and rich, creamy tonkotsu ramen when we’re hungover. But what we don’t have in abundance is refined Japanese cuisine. Tokonoma brings a new round of high-end Japanese food to central Sydney, and you’re going to want to get in on the action. Much of the food at Tokonoma has a Euro-twist, so don’t be freaked out if you get feta with your dashi or truffle with your sashimi (if you’ve eaten at sister restaurant Toko in Surry Hills before, you’ll know the drill). 

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Sydney
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Rising Sun Workshop

Where can you go to fix up your motorbike, grab an excellent coffee and eat kickass Japanese food in between? Rising Sun Workshop in Newotwn. Order the Prison Bento – it's more delicate than its name suggests. On the day we go in there’s a pile of sticky rice with sour, salty pickled umeboshi plum, silken tofu with shoyu, a selection of crunchy pickles (radish, cucumber, daikon and carrot), tamagoyaki (dashi rolled egg omelette) which is light and not as sweet as that which you get in Japan, yogurt sprinkled with nigella seeds that the waiter tells us he ate in Tokyo and a piece of just-cooked Ulladulla albacore tuna ($5 extra).

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Newtown

Ryo's Noodles

Ryo’s fans swear this is some of the best ramen you’ll find in all of Sydney. Duck your way past the traditional Japanese noren curtains hanging out the front and you’ll think you’ve been transported straight to a Tokyo noodle house. The lemon yellow walls are plastered with a dizzying number of banners in Japanese script. Everywhere you look it’s heads down, as diners hoe into steaming bowls of soup filled with crinkly ramen noodles. 

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North Sydney

Sake the Rocks

In an area more known for its beer swilling than cocktail drinking, Saké stands out. And it should – there’s some excitement to be found in this Japanese restaurant and bar. Bar snacks are bite-sized and pack a tasty punch. Salty and often deep-fried, they are perfect accompaniments to the long and potent drink’s list. A hungry group should make a bee-line for the chicken karaage (crunchy crisp-fried pieces of chicken) or the renkon chips – lotus roots that have been lightly fried, sprinkled with coarse rock salt and served with edamame dip. If you’re rolling two deep, opt for the melt-in-your-mouth teriyaki burger balls.

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The Rocks
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Kyo-To - Spice Alley

This little Japanese eatery at Kopi-Tiam Spice Alley is tucked away at the back of the street, with its own covered and open-to-the-elements spaces for eating. Order the spicy tonkotsu ramen if you like your tonkotsu thin and mild, rather than thick and creamy, but really our hearts are with the okonomiyaki. The seafood okonomiyaki is filled with calamari rings, baby octopus, prawns and mussels, made super-smoky with katsuobushi (take a moment to watch it dance, trust us) and topped with a trickle of mayo and a big umami burst of sweet okonomiyaki sauce.

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Chippendale
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Or how about some Thai...?

The best Thai restaurants in Sydney

In Sydney, there’s good Thai and there’s great Thai, and we’re all about the latter. From the best deep-fried snapper to the finest pad Thai outside of Chang Mai, here’s our list of the best places to get your Sydney-Samui on in town.

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By: Time Out editors