Worldwide icon-chevron-right North America icon-chevron-right United States icon-chevron-right New York State icon-chevron-right New York icon-chevron-right Latest restaurant reviews in NYC

Latest restaurant reviews in NYC

Restaurant critics review NYC restaurants, from fine-dining temples to pop-in-anytime neighborhood spots

Hanoi House
Photograph: Cayla Zahoran
Advertising

Want to find out if that new Mexican restaurant is really all it’s cracked up to be, or if the hottest sushi counter is worth the price? Check out Time Out New York’s restaurant reviews in NYC, detailing everything from highbrow fine-dining restaurants to destination-worthy holes in the wall.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to the best restaurants in NYC

A picture of the Time Out Magazine

Missing Time Out magazine?

You can still read our latest issue from the comfort of your couch

Read online

Latest restaurant reviews in NYC

Ernesto's
Photograph: Rachel Vanni
Restaurants

Ernesto's

Two Bridges
3 out of 5 stars

Ryan Bartlow spent two years cooking in San Sebastián, a Basque Country seaside town known as much for its high concentration of Michelin-rated restaurants as its casual pinxto bars. In his first solo restaurant, the 38-year-old chef leans more toward the relaxed, convivial atmosphere of the latter (thankfully).Since Ernesto’s opened, one of the most popular dishes has been the paleta Iberico con chips ($22), a fairly common dish in Spain that we don’t often see in New York. A mountain of thinly cut potato chips is draped with ribbons of imported jamón. While the chips tasted too salty on their own, they were perfect when combined with a bite of ham and a shared glass (or two) of wine.The menu’s Para Picar (“To Nibble”) section has other shareable plates (all $10). You’ll find classic recipes like the nuestra tortilla and always popular gildas con atún, which has skewers of anchovies, peppers and olives with slices of canned tuna belly on the side. Featuring a bar that stretches nearly the length of the 55-seat room, the restaurant has the same festive energy found in Donostia, as San Sebastián is called in Basque.On our two visits, the service was friendly and laid-back. A knowledgeable bartender guided us through the well-edited wine list, which includes some esoteric bottles, and a hostess enthusiastically recommended the next-door wine bar, which is a café during the day.  However, we waited a long time to place our drink orders, and a quoted 20-minute wait was nearly an

Mina's NYC
Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants, Greek

Mina's

Long Island City
3 out of 5 stars

Real New Yorkers often avoid museum cafés for fear of price-gouging and all those tourists. Having spent years as a chef to artists and top galleries before publishing Cooking for Artists (2015), Mina Stone is uniquely positioned to make MoMA PS1’s dining option just as much a destination as the museum’s current exhibitions.Pistachio walls with fuschia lighting makes Mina’s feel like one of the galleries. Wearing a restaurant’s merch has become a flex, and Mina’s takes that a step further, selling its own brand of Páros olive oil in bottles designed by the artist Urs Fischer.Sesame seeds splattered the table like confetti when we broke the bread that came with our selection of small plates (choice of four, $22): whipped feta; a briney fava dip with capers; meaty olives with cracked coriander; and quick-pickled carrots. If you don’t already know Stone’s cooking, the menu is a pleasant intro to her Greek-ish recipes.On recent visits, the peinirli ($12), essentially a cheese boat topped with an egg, was overcooked and needed more yolkiness, but it was still comforting. A nod to Stone’s Jewish and Greek heritage, the challah French toast ($14) is filled with perfect savory notes from goopy tahini and tart Greek yogurt, topped with seasonal fruit compote (there’s also a babka version). But our favorite was the breakfast mezze ($18): With tangy beet tzatziki (easily the brightest color that appears in the room), chewy fried halloumi and jammy eggs, it’s a rare trifecta of ingredien

Advertising
Tamra Teahouse
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants, Cafés

Tamra Teahouse

Crown Heights
3 out of 5 stars

The menu at Tamra Teahouse is initially hard to pin down to any particular cuisine: Chef-owner Yunha Moh is a first-generation immigrant by way of South Korea, and inspiration from his heritage appears throughout the menu. Meanwhile, there are also nods to the Caribbean food that’s endemic to Crown Heights, Latin cooking and Pan-Asian ingredients. In the wrong hands, the fusion could get muddled, but here it is both creative and ambitious.You might be sick of menus that feature avocado toast, but Tamra’s take ($10)—served on tostones instead of bread—reinvents the recipe with help from a sweet pineapple dressing and sesame seeds. However, you can pass on the carrot salad ($9) with chadon beni (a Trinidadian herb similar to cilantro), Thai basil and pumpkin seeds, as its resulting flavors are too similar to the superior avocado dish. Curry is common in many cultures, and  the version ($11) here is a hit, with butternut squash, corn and potatoes served with jasmine rice, chadon beni and daikon pickles. We’ve come back multiple times for this plentiful helping of balanced sweetness, finished off with a zig-zag  of magenta sauce. The curry with oxtails ($16) braised in coconut milk, lemongrass, ginger and shrimp paste—in the style of Filipino kare kare—is silky and tender, though it could’ve used a crunchy element. By far the best dish is the atypical pho ($13), which arrives as a glistening spicy-sour soup, a combination of chicken, lime and jalapeño that feels filling and deepl

Bar Bête
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants, Bistros

Bar Bête

Carroll Gardens
5 out of 5 stars

A French-style omelette may appear to be a simple recipe, but, for many chefs, it’s a gauge of a cook’s technical skills. In the case of Bar Bête, Marc St. Jacques should lead a master class: His rolled omelette ($15) is a silky, perfectly pale-yellow blanket of eggs that cradles a generous amount of peekytoe crab with finely chopped chives, all topped with seaweed butter.This dish alone convinced us that we could be regulars at this Brooklyn spot, which draws inspiration from the trendy neighborhood bistros dotting cities like Paris, Montreal and New Orleans. When these restaurants are done right, they feel like updated classics offering well-executed plates in a casual environment that peels back any pretense. Recently, we stepped into the narrow, 50-seat room. There was a buzzy energy, but you could still have a conversation above the din. There’s a glow throughout the understated space that matches the food itself: classic but with unexpected twists that keep surprising you, no matter how many times you’ve tasted these flavors before. Take the chickpea crêpe ($9), for example, which reminded us of  two favorites: socca, the crispy snack commonly found in the South of France, and a comforting grilled-cheese sandwich—here, the crêpe’s triangles of dough oozed with buttery cow cheese and spicy Swiss chard. The mushroom brioche ($7) glistens as the sherry butter melts on top; if you order this with the crêpe, it’s like nirvana for a carb lover.As a Frenchman next to us tucked

Advertising
Portale
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants, Italian

Portale

Chelsea
4 out of 5 stars

“I WAS OBSESSED with the seafood salad,” says a regal woman seated at the sleek bar in her LBD and pearl earrings. “Can you guys make that for me?”  She is referring to a dish that chef Alfred Portale made iconic at the celebrated Gotham Bar & Grill, where he ran the kitchen for more than 30 years. But you won’t find said dish—or the other meticulously stacked plates he made popular—at his first solo endeavor, Portale, where he is hoping to find a new audience. Instead, to familiarize yourself with the nearly three-month-old restaurant, consider the generous serving of fritto misto ($21) teeming with calamari, cod and shrimp, all lightly battered in rice flour.  This fried appetizer exemplifies Portale’s more casual approach to fine dining. While the 7,000-square-foot eatery spans two floors, the intimate downstairs comprises a front room (which includes a 14-seat bar) separated from a main dining room that, with its white oak, brass accents and Calacatta marble, feels like an extension of the nearby West Elm. You won’t find white tablecloths here, but many of the chef’s longtime fans will no doubt be drawn to familiar luxuries like the delicate foie gras tortellini in brodo ($21).  But it’s the half-dozen pastas, each handmade from locally farmed grains milled in the open kitchen, that best showcase the new Portale—both the chef and the restaurant. The bowl of lumache ($28) is faultless: The elbow-shaped dough is covered in a rich white bolognese that’s studded with fleck

232 Bleecker
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants

232 Bleecker

West Village
4 out of 5 stars

AFTER REBRANDING FROM Dig Inn to just Dig, the fast-casual brand is one-upping its salad competitors with its first-ever upscale restaurant. Yet upon entering, you’d never suspect its corporate origins: Helmed by chef Suzanne Cupps (formerly of the Whitney’s Untitled café), it has a far more soothing feel than the lunch-hour rush at Dig.   Many of the vegetables are sourced from the same farms as ingredients found at the salad spot, only at a higher price point.    The best offering is charred cauliflower ($17) with Concord grape jam and sunflower butter: The concept initially seems like a kid’s wacky concoction but reveals itself to be an inspired homage to PB&J. Such fare is precisely where Cupps demonstrates her prowess for cooking in a monastic style that has a touch of the unexpected.    We also appreciated the hunks of marinated beets ($14) beside funky, unctuous black lentils topped with fried shallots. The carrots ($17) are another colorful, shareable plate: Grilled on an open-fire hearth and served with a sweet hot-honey ricotta, the root vegetable stands on its own.    It’s unsurprising that the menu’s least appealing item is the porchetta ($26), an entrée that needed more acidity from the pickled fennel to balance out the overpowering (and almost nauseating) fattiness.    By contrast, the kitchen excels at feeding our city’s revived lasagna kick. Cupps’s homey version ($29) abstains from red sauce; instead, the recipe is composed of tiers of luxurious Jas

Advertising
Casa Ora
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants, Venezuelan

Casa Ora

East Williamsburg
3 out of 5 stars

Most New Yorkers only know the basics of Venezuelan cuisine: arepas and empanadas. Few restaurants in the city offer the South American nation’s lesser-known dishes, let alone incorporate them into fine dining. Casa Ora is intent on changing that. A lived-in feeling pervades the space (its name translates to “home”), thanks to hanging pothos plants, velvet couches, framed maps of the country and photographs documenting Venzuelan street life. It’s a full house: Ivo Diaz (a NoMad alum) and his partner, pastry chef Rachel Diaz Pirard, opened the space with his mother, Isbelis, whose home-style Venezuelan cooking has been transformed. We began our meal with tequeños ($10), or Latin-style cheese sticks, crispy shells that ooze queso blanco instead of mozzarella. We loved dipping them into the tartar and guasacaca sauces—a step up from simple marinara. After that delicious start, a few of Casa Ora’s dishes got bogged down in too-similar flavor profiles, making it redundant to share plates, even if they were individually pleasant. For example, the hallaca ($12), pork tamal with chickpeas, could’ve used more olives for some extra dimension. The bollitos pelones ($14), which are corn dumplings stuffed with ground beef in a tomato sauce, lacked a strong taste of its component ingredients. But some plates do stand out, such as the pabellón ($26), an elevation of the traditional Venezualen rice and beans with shredded pork, here as a slab of brisket. Next to that generous portion is

Mothership Meat Company
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants, Barbecue

Mothership Meat Company

Long Island City
3 out of 5 stars

No matter the style of barbecue, the meat always garners the accolades. The sides get the Susan Lucci treatment: They’re consistently a part of the conversation and sometimes raved about, but, more often than not, it’s a case of “always the bridesmaid, never the bride.” At Mothership Meat Company, the supporting cast of dishes (each $4–$7) takes center stage.Consider the peppery pork and beans, which could easily be a satisfying entrée on its own. The fluffy cornbread is not too sweet (like too many versions we’ve wasted calories on). Our order of mac and cheese, each noodle swaddled in melted cheddar, tasted as if it had been lovingly baked all day.Perhaps this shouldn’t be a surprise in a whimsical space where graffiti art of aliens and spaceships, instead of the usual taxidermy and cowboy boots, adorns the walls. As it turns out, pitmaster (and co-owner) Josh Bowen has always been a bit of a nonconformist. When he opened the nearby John Brown Smokehouse in 2011, the menu boasted Kansas City–style smoked meats in a borough known more for bibimbap than beef short ribs.Here, the barbecue inspiration turns to Texas. The meat is ordered by the pound: We’d go back for the short-rib pastrami ($30/pound), with its balanced salty and smoky flavors. The fatty brisket ($26) is superior to the somewhat dry lean brisket ($23). If you order the prime rib ($30), be sure to ask for some rarer slices. We savored the beef-and-pork sausage links ($8), a juicy German-style bratwurst. As we du

Advertising
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants

Claudia's

East Williamsburg
3 out of 5 stars

There's a common bias that street food, especially if its origins are non-Western, should be cheap. But when you order a doblada ($7) from Claudia’s, paying a few dollars more is no problem (nor should it be). What arrives is a perfectly fried masa empanada enveloping shredded brisket that’s been cooking for 24 hours. It’s topped with an avocado mash and wisps of fermented cabbage, adding a nice zing. This well-prepared pastry—we dare you to eat just one—is just a single example of how Claudia Lopez and her brother, executive chef Mario Lopez, are showcasing Guatemalan cuisine, a rarity in New York’s dining scene (they're also working with the team behind Williamsburg bar Midnights). While you can also find a decent burger and a commendable fried-chicken sandwich on the menu, we favored the traditional choices. After all, this East Williamsburg restaurant, which started as a daytime-only café called C. Lo’s, draws on family recipes. To start your meal, be sure to order a tamal ($7). A dish steeped in tradition, it’s comprised of a banana leaf holding a fluffy rectangle of corn flour filled with your choice of pork, beef or vegetables. Another item,  perfect for winter: sopa de gallina ($10), a generous portion of chicken soup that’s stuffed with succulent chicken, root vegetables and macaroni noodles that just might cure a cold. A more complex dish is the pepian de gallina ($14), one of the most popular stews of the Guatemalan kitchen. The poultry is slow-cooked in a sauc

HiHi Room
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants

The HiHi Room

Boerum Hill
3 out of 5 stars

For almost a decade, Eric Finkelstein and Matt Ross’s beloved sandwich shop Court Street Grocers has maintained its scrappy, art-school ethos (signs in bubble lettering and playful menu names like “Uncle Chucky”), even after opening multiple locations. Now, they’ve evolved with a first-ever, full-service restaurant that’s shockingly not about deli meat stuffed in bread, save for muffuletta. Their knack for reviving quirky regional specialities (as they did with the kaiser onion rolls and celery soda at Court Street) can be seen in the hush puppies ($6). They were a bit dry, though the honey butter made them better. We preferred the thinly sliced, salt-baked celery root over faro ($15), which had a tart punch of vinegar.Brooklynites may flinch at the idea of Cincinnati chili, which is dumped atop spaghetti and often comes with oyster crackers. Chef Walker Stern’s adaptation ($22) is elevated with handmade noodles and duck bolognese but stays true to the Ohioan delicacy’s origins with raw onion and ajwain, here, an approximation of the original’s near-mythic spice blend. Overall, it felt like the kitchen was afraid to use the heavy-handed seasoning this dish needs for more dimension. Beans do not often get their proper due, but at HiHi, they pull their weight in the menu’s two best offerings: Steen’s cane-syrup–glazed chicken ($22) with baked-style butter beans and the perfectly crispy trout ($32), which comes with a cascade of Sea Island red peas, replicating pebbles in a stre

Advertising
Public Records
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Bars, Lounges

Public Records

Gowanus
4 out of 5 stars

We first encountered chef Daniel Bagnall a few months back at Short Stories, a clubby restaurant on the Bowery that initially seems easy to write off as basic due to its millennial-pink interior and influencer-heavy clientele. But the food—we tasted a pasta with ramp pesto and pickled strawberries—was memorable. Bagnall left for Public Records, where he’s whipping up more impressive, plant-based offerings.More than a restaurant, Public  Records is also a music venue, a bar and a zine shop stocked with printed matter on niche topics, like the aesthetics of football culture, next to lingonberry gummy candies. No matter what mood you’re in, the spot has something to offer: a morning cortado, an energetic yet mature group hangout where you can feel like you’ve “gone out” but still make it to bed by 10pm, and food that’s flexible to dietary restrictions. Located on an industrial block, it feels like a secret passageway into one of the  laid-back restaurants that are currently hot in Mexico City, with a touch of  hypnotic, austere Berlin nightlife. Grand ceilings,  skylights and a spacious gravel patio feel like a blessing in a city known for cramped quarters. And the entirely vegan menu is a nod to the building’s history as a former ASPCA. Dishes are ambitious and surprising (and not just because the dim lights don’t do justice to the Technicolor ingredients). The outstanding but vaguely named Fermented Bok Choy ($13) was a thick-cut sourdough toast topped with  kimchi–bok choy an

Yin Ji Chang Fen
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants, Chinese

Yin Ji Chang Fen

Chinatown
3 out of 5 stars

It’s not uncommon these days for chefs to concoct a recipe just in hopes of striking social media gold. They’ll artfully arrange grain bowls or trick you into thinking a grilled watermelon is a ham—at best, the results are often more show than substance. But Yin Ji Chang Fen’s cheong fun are popular, despite breaking a cardinal rule of internet clickbait: The delicate Chinese rice noodle rolls are white. The tissue-thin noodles won’t pop on Instagram like rainbow sprinkles or gooey, stretchy cheese dripping from a slice of pizza.Yet the Cantonese-style dish has taken over New York with the help of this Guangzhou, China–based chain, which has eateries around the world. Opened earlier this fall, the Bayard Street location in Chinatown still commands lines out the door. Once you’re finally seated inside the brightly lit corner space, you’ll find 16 varieties of cheong fun, ranging from $2.95 to $6.95 each. The steamed rice noodle rolls are bursting with fillings such as plump shrimp and crispy youtiao, a Chinese cruller. While we’ve tasted versions made from thinner noodles—a standard by which some people judge a kitchen’s expertise—the quality ingredients inside impressed us (think generous slices of sweet barbecue pork or fresh seafood). Unlike Joe’s Steam Rice Roll, perhaps the city’s best purveyor of cheong fun, Yin Ji Chang Fen also offers a variety of snacks and congee. For example, the fragrant curry fish balls ($5.50) add a nice counterpoint to the shareable rice porrid

Advertising
Red Hook Tavern
Photograph: Time Out/Ali Garber
Restaurants

Red Hook Tavern

Red Hook
4 out of 5 stars

There’s been much written about how Billy Durney’s Red Hook Tavern draws inspiration from New York institutions. The font used for the restaurant’s name could be mistaken for Minetta Tavern’s from afar, and there are two ales dedicated to McSorley’s. But once we secured a seat (if you manage to score a prime-time reservation, play the lottery), we quickly realized the experience here is its very own thing.After an affable employee leads you down the narrow dining room or to one of the 18 bar seats, your first priority is to order the Dry Aged Red Hook Tavern Burger ($24). This pub-style burger is hefty but manageable. The simple dish—a dry-aged patty cloaked in American cheese and topped with raw white onions, then sandwiched between sesame rolls—is cooked to a perfect temperature. This juicy burger is one of the best we’ve tasted in the city.It’s no surprise that the burger and the menu’s other meat options are also expertly executed. Durney showed off his expertise with proteins at Hometown Bar-B-Que, a popular destination despite its location in difficult-to-get-to Red Hook, that’s known for its ribs, brisket, sausages, pastrami and other barbecue dishes with global touches.Executive chef Allison Plumer interprets the nostalgia that Red Hook Tavern strives for with an unfussy approach that results in plates you’ll want to devour on a cold winter day. The country-ham croquettes ($10), which are filled with white cheddar and sit atop a swath of dijonnaise, can be popped into

Show more

Looking for the very best?

Recommended

    You may also like

      Advertising